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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Patient satisfaction and uptake of private-sector run malaria diagnosis clinics in a post-conflict district in Sri Lanka.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2014
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With the incidence of malaria in Sri Lanka declining, intensive parasitological surveillance has been identified as a key strategy to achieve elimination by end 2014. Tropical and Environmental Diseases and Health Associates Private Limited (TEDHA) in collaboration with the Anti-Malaria Campaign established 43 malaria diagnostic laboratories (MDL) in four post-conflict districts of the Northern and Eastern Provinces. This study assesses the patterns of referral of patients with fever for malaria diagnosis by health care providers (HCPs) in four government hospitals in one of the districts of the Northern Province, and patient satisfaction with the laboratory services offered.
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Usefulness of polymerase chain reaction to supplement field microscopy in a pre-selected population with a high probability of malaria infections.
Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2011
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This study determines the use of nested PCR as a diagnostic tool to supplement field microscopy in symptomatic individuals suspected of being positive for malaria, and it explores its role in active case detection to identify asymptomatic parasite carriers. In symptomatic individuals, compared with PCR, microscopy had a sensitivity of 86.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 77.8-92.4) and specificity of 100% (95% CI = 96.9-100). During active case detection, two asymptomatic persons were diagnosed as having vivax malaria by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) but not microscopy. Currently, PCR is being carried out in Sri Lanka only for population surveys to estimate the hidden reservoir of malaria. Based on the results of this study and because of cost considerations, pooled PCR will be used in the future to screen samples from clinically suspected foci to increase the proportion of malaria cases detected. This strategy will assist the success of the malaria elimination program in Sri Lanka.
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Operational strategies to achieve and maintain malaria elimination.
Lancet
PUBLISHED: 10-28-2010
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Present elimination strategies are based on recommendations derived during the Global Malaria Eradication Program of the 1960s. However, many countries considering elimination nowadays have high intrinsic transmission potential and, without the support of a regional campaign, have to deal with the constant threat of imported cases of the disease, emphasising the need to revisit the strategies on which contemporary elimination programmes are based. To eliminate malaria, programmes need to concentrate on identification and elimination of foci of infections through both passive and active methods of case detection. This approach needs appropriate treatment of both clinical cases and asymptomatic infections, combined with targeted vector control. Draining of infectious pools entirely will not be sufficient since they could be replenished by imported malaria. Elimination will thus additionally need identification and treatment of incoming infections before they lead to transmission, or, more realistically, embarking on regional initiatives to dry up importation at its source.
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Shrinking the malaria map: progress and prospects.
Lancet
PUBLISHED: 10-28-2010
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In the past 150 years, roughly half of the countries in the world eliminated malaria. Nowadays, there are 99 endemic countries-67 are controlling malaria and 32 are pursuing an elimination strategy. This four-part Series presents evidence about the technical, operational, and financial dimensions of malaria elimination. The first paper in this Series reviews definitions of elimination and the state that precedes it: controlled low-endemic malaria. Feasibility assessments are described as a crucial step for a country transitioning from controlled low-endemic malaria to elimination. Characteristics of the 32 malaria-eliminating countries are presented, and contrasted with countries that pursued elimination in the past. Challenges and risks of elimination are presented, including Plasmodium vivax, resistance in the parasite and mosquito populations, and potential resurgence if investment and vigilance decrease. The benefits of elimination are outlined, specifically elimination as a regional and global public good. Priorities for the next decade are described.
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Geographic structure of Plasmodium vivax: microsatellite analysis of parasite populations from Sri Lanka, Myanmar, and Ethiopia.
Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2010
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Genetic diversity and population structure of Plasmodium vivax parasites can predict the origin and spread of novel variants within a population enabling population specific malaria control measures. We analyzed the genetic diversity and population structure of 425 P. vivax isolates from Sri Lanka, Myanmar, and Ethiopia using 12 trinucleotide and tetranucleotide microsatellite markers. All three parasite populations were highly polymorphic with 3-44 alleles per locus. Approximately 65% were multiple-clone infections. Mean genetic diversity (H(E)) was 0.7517 in Ethiopia, 0.8450 in Myanmar, and 0.8610 in Sri Lanka. Significant linkage disequilibrium was maintained. Population structure showed two clusters (Asian and African) according to geography and ancestry. Strong clustering of outbreak isolates from Sri Lanka and Ethiopia was observed. Predictive power of ancestry using two-thirds of the isolates as a model identified 78.2% of isolates accurately as being African or Asian. Microsatellite analysis is a useful tool for mapping short-term outbreaks of malaria and for predicting ancestry.
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Absence of asymptomatic malaria infections in previously high endemic areas of Sri Lanka.
Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
PUBLISHED: 10-29-2009
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As the goal of malaria elimination from Sri Lanka is currently being pursued, this study was planned to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic malaria infections. Five health areas in Trincomalee and Kurunegala districts that reported high prevalence in the recent past were purposively selected. The smallest administrative units (GN divisions) having high malaria risk within each area were identified. From these divisions, 20% of the population was randomly selected for blood smear examination and in a 50% sub-sample polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was performed. A population of 3,730 from 13 GN divisions was sampled. Thick and thin Giemsa-stained blood smears were negative for malaria parasites. The PCR carried out in 50% of the study sample was also negative for malaria parasites. The findings illustrate the absence of asymptomatic carriers in previously high transmission areas and it appears that achieving malaria elimination in Sri Lanka by 2015 is feasible.
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Malaria control and elimination in Sri Lanka: documenting progress and success factors in a conflict setting.
PLoS ONE
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Sri Lanka has a long history of malaria control, and over the past decade has had dramatic declines in cases amid a national conflict. A case study of Sri Lankas malaria programme was conducted to characterize the programme and explain recent progress.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.