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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Evolutionary origins of C-terminal (GPP)n 3-hydroxyproline formation in vertebrate tendon collagen.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Approximately half the proline residues in fibrillar collagen are hydroxylated. The predominant form is 4-hydroxyproline, which helps fold and stabilize the triple helix. A minor form, 3-hydroxyproline, still has no clear function. Using peptide mass spectrometry, we recently revealed several previously unknown molecular sites of 3-hydroxyproline in fibrillar collagen chains. In fibril-forming A-clade collagen chains, four new partially occupied 3-hydroxyproline sites were found (A2, A3, A4 and (GPP)n) in addition to the fully occupied A1 site at Pro986. The C-terminal (GPP)n motif has five consecutive GPP triplets in ?1(I), four in ?2(I) and three in ?1(II), all subject to 3-hydroxylation. The evolutionary origins of this substrate sequence were investigated by surveying the pattern of its 3-hydroxyproline occupancy from early chordates through amphibians, birds and mammals. Different tissue sources of type I collagen (tendon, bone and skin) and type II collagen (cartilage and notochord) were examined by mass spectrometry. The (GPP)n domain was found to be a major substrate for 3-hydroxylation only in vertebrate fibrillar collagens. In higher vertebrates (mouse, bovine and human), up to five 3-hydroxyproline residues per (GPP)n motif were found in ?1(I) and four in ?2(I), with an average of two residues per chain. In vertebrate type I collagen the modification exhibited clear tissue specificity, with 3-hydroxyproline prominent only in tendon. The occupancy also showed developmental changes in Achilles tendon, with increasing 3-hydroxyproline levels with age. The biological significance is unclear but the level of 3-hydroxylation at the (GPP)n site appears to have increased as tendons evolved and shows both tendon type and developmental variations within a species.
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Structure of the factor VIII C2 domain in a ternary complex with 2 inhibitor antibodies reveals classical and nonclassical epitopes.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2013
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The factor VIII C2 domain is a highly immunogenic domain, whereby inhibitory antibodies develop following factor VIII replacement therapy for congenital hemophilia A patients. Inhibitory antibodies also arise spontaneously in cases of acquired hemophilia A. The structural basis for molecular recognition by 2 classes of anti-C2 inhibitory antibodies that bind to factor VIII simultaneously was investigated by x-ray crystallography. The C2 domain/3E6 FAB/G99 FAB ternary complex illustrates that each antibody recognizes epitopes on opposing faces of the factor VIII C2 domain. The 3E6 epitope forms direct contacts to the C2 domain at 2 loops consisting of Glu2181-Ala2188 and Thr2202-Arg2215, whereas the G99 epitope centers on Lys2227 and also makes direct contacts with loops Gln2222-Trp2229, Leu2261-Ser2263, His2269-Val2282, and Arg2307-Gln2311. Each binding interface is highly electrostatic, with positive charge present on both C2 epitopes and complementary negative charge on each antibody. A new model of membrane association is also presented, where the 3E6 epitope faces the negatively charged membrane surface and Arg2320 is poised at the center of the binding interface. These results illustrate the potential complexities of the polyclonal anti-factor VIII immune response and further define the "classical" and "nonclassical" types of antibody inhibitors against the factor VIII C2 domain.
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Characterization and solution structure of the factor VIII C2 domain in a ternary complex with classical and non-classical inhibitor antibodies.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2013
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The most significant complication for patients with severe cases of congenital or acquired hemophilia A is the development of inhibitor antibodies against coagulation factor VIII (fVIII). The C2 domain of fVIII is a significant antigenic target of anti-fVIII antibodies. Here, we have utilized small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and biochemical techniques to characterize interactions between two different classes of anti-C2 domain inhibitor antibodies and the isolated C2 domain. Multiple assays indicated that antibodies 3E6 and G99 bind independently to the fVIII C2 domain and can form a stable ternary complex. SAXS-derived numerical estimates of dimensional parameters for all studied complexes agree with the proportions of the constituent proteins. Ab initio modeling of the SAXS data results in a long kinked structure of the ternary complex, showing an angle centered at the C2 domain of ?130°. Guided by biochemical data, rigid body modeling of subunits into the molecular envelope of the ternary complex suggests that antibody 3E6 recognizes a C2 domain epitope consisting of the Arg(2209)-Ser(2216) and Leu(2178)-Asp(2187) loops. In contrast, antibody G99 recognizes the C2 domain primarily through the Pro(2221)-Trp(2229) loop. These two epitopes are on opposing sides of the fVIII C2 domain, are consistent with the solvent accessibility in the context of the entire fVIII molecule, and provide further structural detail regarding the pathogenic immune response to fVIII.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.