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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Use of acid sphingomyelinase for cancer therapy.
Adv. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2013
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Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lipid hydrolase that cleaves the sphingolipid, sphingomyelin, into ceramide. Mutations in the ASM gene (SMPD1) result in the rare lysosomal storage disorder, Niemann-Pick disease (NPD). In addition to its role in NPD, over the past two decades, the importance of sphingolipids, and ASM in particular, in normal physiology and the pathophysiology of numerous common diseases also has become known. For example, altered sphingolipid metabolism occurs in many cancers, generally reducing the levels of the pro-apoptotic lipid, ceramide, and/or elevating the levels of the proliferative lipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). These changes likely contribute to the tumorigenicity and/or metastatic capacity of the cancer. In addition, many cancer therapies induce ceramide-mediated death, and cancer cells have evolved novel mechanisms to overcome this effect. In the present review, we discuss sphingolipid metabolism in cancer, and specifically the potential for pharmacological modulation using ASM. Of note, recombinant human ASM (rhASM) has been produced for human use and is being evaluated as a treatment for NPD. Thus, its use for cancer therapy could be rapidly evaluated in the clinic after appropriate animal model studies have been completed. As this enzyme was initially studied in the context of NPD, we start with a brief overview of the history of ASM and NPD, followed by a discussion of the role of ASM in cancer biology, and then summarize emerging preclinical efficacy studies using rhASM as an adjunct in the treatment of solid tumors.
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Recombinant human acid sphingomyelinase as an adjuvant to sorafenib treatment of experimental liver cancer.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of liver cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The only approved systemic treatment for unresectable HCC is the oral kinase inhibitor, sorafenib. Recombinant human acid sphingomyelinase (rhASM), which hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide, is an orphan drug under development for the treatment of Type B Niemann-Pick disease (NPD). Due to the hepatotropic nature of rhASM and its ability to generate pro-apoptotic ceramide, this study evaluated the use of rhASM as an adjuvant treatment with sorafenib in experimental models of HCC.
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Gene-expression signature of vascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma.
J. Hepatol.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2011
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Vascular invasion is a major predictor of tumor recurrence after surgical treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). While macroscopic vascular invasion can be detected by radiological techniques, pre-operative detection of microscopic vascular invasion, which complicates 30-40% of patients with early tumors, remains elusive.
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MicroRNA-based classification of hepatocellular carcinoma and oncogenic role of miR-517a.
Gastroenterology
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2011
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Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a heterogeneous tumor that develops via activation of multiple pathways and molecular alterations. It has been a challenge to identify molecular classes of HCC and design treatment strategies for each specific subtype. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in HCC pathogenesis, and their expression profiles have been used to classify cancers. We analyzed miRNA expression in human HCC samples to identify molecular subclasses and oncogenic miRNAs.
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New strategies in hepatocellular carcinoma: genomic prognostic markers.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-16-2010
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Accurate prognosis prediction in oncology is critical. In patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), unlike most solid tumors, the coexistence of two life-threatening conditions, cancer and cirrhosis, makes prognostic assessments difficult. Despite the usefulness of clinical staging systems for HCC in routine clinical decision making (e.g., Barcelona-Clinic Liver Cancer algorithm), there is still a need to refine and complement outcome predictions. Recent data suggest the ability of gene signatures from the tumor (e.g., EpCAM signature) and adjacent tissue (e.g., poor-survival signature) to predict outcome in HCC (either recurrence or overall survival), although independent external validation is still required. In addition, novel information is being produced by alternative genomic sources such as microRNA (miRNA; e.g., miR-26a) or epigenomics, areas in which promising preliminary data are thoroughly explored. Prognostic models need to contemplate the impact of liver dysfunction and risk of subsequent de novo tumors in a patients life expectancy. The challenge for the future is to precisely depict genomic predictors (e.g., gene signatures, miRNA, or epigenetic biomarkers) at each stage of the disease and their specific influence to determine patient prognosis.
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Lymphotoxins: new targets for hepatocellular carcinoma.
Cancer Cell
PUBLISHED: 10-06-2009
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In this issue of Cancer Cell, Haybaeck et al. unravel the role of lymphotoxin pathway in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Aberrant activation of this cascade in mice livers recapitulates the stages of fibrosis and inflammation that precedes human liver cancer, providing a novel family of potential therapeutic targets.
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Ras pathway activation in hepatocellular carcinoma and anti-tumoral effect of combined sorafenib and rapamycin in vivo.
J. Hepatol.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2009
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The success of sorafenib in the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has focused interest on the role of Ras signaling in this malignancy. We investigated the molecular alterations of the Ras pathway in HCC and the antineoplastic effects of sorafenib in combination with rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR pathway, in experimental models.
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Block-copolymer micelles as carriers of cell signaling modulators for the inhibition of JNK in human islets of Langerhans.
Biomaterials
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2009
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Here we investigate the potential of PCL-b-PEO micelles in preventing the cell death of isolated human islets of Langerhans. PCL-b-PEO micelles were loaded with c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases inhibitor SP600125 to rescue the isolated islets. Mechanistic studies of the uptake were conducted in PC12 cells. Incorporation of SP600125 afforded 8.2 fold greater solubility of SP600125 in micelle suspension. To investigate the effectiveness of micelle-incorporated SP600125 in preventing the islet cell death, we challenged the islets with TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IFN gamma. Micelle-incorporated SP600125 did not lose its inhibitory activity during incorporation into micelles, and it protected the islets against cytokine-induced loss of viability to the same extent as control SP600125. Moreover, the concentration of micelle-incorporated SP600125 used was 13-fold lower, demonstrating the greater efficacy of micelle delivered SP600125. Micelles maintained their cytoplasmic distribution without detectable nuclear localization in islets. The inhibition of JNK was confirmed by western blots. This study suggests that micelle-based intracellular delivery of potent, poorly water soluble, cell-death-pathway inhibitors may represent a valuable addition to established delivery of cytocidal block-copolymer micelle-incorporated bioactives.
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Wnt-pathway activation in two molecular classes of hepatocellular carcinoma and experimental modulation by sorafenib.
Clin. Cancer Res.
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Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a heterogeneous cancer with active Wnt signaling. Underlying biologic mechanisms remain unclear and no drug targeting this pathway has been approved to date. We aimed to characterize Wnt-pathway aberrations in HCC patients, and to investigate sorafenib as a potential Wnt modulator in experimental models of liver cancer.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.