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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Computer based screening for novel inhibitors against Vibrio cholerae using NCI diversity set-II: an alternative approach by targeting transcriptional activator ToxT.
Interdiscip Sci
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2014
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Cholera is a severe diarrheal disease caused by Vibrio cholerae and remains as a major health risk in developing countries. The emergence and spread of multi-drug resistant V. cholerae strains during the past two decades is now a major problem in the treatment of cholera and have created the urgent need for the development of novel therapeutic agents. Targeting transcriptional factor is now a novel approach to tackle the development of multi-drug resistant strain. In the recent year virtual high throughput screening has emerged as a widely accepted powerful technology in the identification of novel and diverse lead. This study provides new insight to the search for new potent and selective inhibitors that still remains necessary to avoid the risk of possible resistance and reduce toxicity and side effects of currently available cholera drugs. The publications of high resolution X-ray structure of V. cholerae ToxT has open the way to the structure based virtual screening to identify new small molecular inhibitors which still remain necessary to avoid the risk of possible resistance and reduce toxicity and side effects of currently available cholera drugs. In this study we have performed structure based virtual screening approach using NCI diversity set-II to look for novel inhibitor of ToxT and proposed eight candidate compounds with high scoring function. Thus from complex scoring and binding ability it is elucidated that these compounds could be the promising inhibitors or could be developed as novel lead compounds for drug design against cholera.
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Blood pressure variability and pedigree analysis of nocturnal SBP dipping in Kumbas from rural Chhattisgarh, India.
Indian J. Exp. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 05-24-2014
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Family is the smallest unit of people to share most of the lifestyle, environmental and genetic factors. They are likely to have similarity in many physiological and behavioural aspects. Therefore, we designed a protocol to test the effect of large rural Indian families living together (Kumbas), on blood pressure variability. We also investigated the hypothesis that 'nocturnal dipping' in systolic blood pressure (SBP) is not heritable. Members of two families (1 and 2) consisting of 3-4 generations willingly participated in the study. Both families (natives of Chhattisgarh) belong to reasonably peaceful rural area and are financially stable. Farming is the main occupation of the members of both families. Few members of the families had jobs or small business. The null hypothesis regarding heritability of nocturnal dipping trait was accepted based on data emanating from either of the studied families. Hourly-averaged values depicted less variation in males and females of family 1 from midnight to early morning at around 06:00, as compared to that in males and females of family 2. The 24 h averages of BP in family 2 were significantly higher as compared to that in family 1. Further, in family 2 the peaks of SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) occurred significantly earlier as compared to that in family 1. The peak spread of SBP, DBP, heart rate (HR), MAP and pulse pressure (PP) among the members of family 1 was narrower than that for the members of family 2. Arbitrary cut-off values for classification of dipping, small sample size, and age dependency of nocturnal dipping might have marred outcome of the pedigree analysis of nocturnal dipping trait in this study. We have a hunch that the family shares typical temporal ups and downs in 24 h BP and HR. The above hypothesis needs confirmation based on studies with large data set involving subjective and objective assessment of the effects of psychosocial factors on BP and HR variability.
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Comparison of arsenic uptake ability of barnyard grass and rice species for arsenic phytoremediation.
Environ Monit Assess
PUBLISHED: 04-30-2014
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In this research, the relative performance in arsenic (As) remediation was evaluated among some barnyard grass and rice species under hydroponic conditions. To this end, four barnyard grass varieties and two rice species were selected and tested for their remediation potential of arsenic. The plants were grown for 2 weeks in As-rich solutions up to 10 mg As L(-1) to measure their tolerance to As and their uptake capabilities. Among the varieties of plants tested in all treatment types, BR-29 rice absorbed the highest amount of As in the root, while Nipponbare translocated the maximum amount of As in the shoot. Himetainubie barnyard grass produced the highest biomass, irrespective of the quantity of As in the solution. In all As-treated solutions, the maximum uptake of As was found in BR-29 followed by Choto shama and Himetainubie. In contrast, while the bioaccumulation factor was found to be the highest in Nipponbare followed by BR-29 and Himetainubie. The results suggest that both Choto shama and Himetainubie barnyard grass varieties should exhibit a great potential for As removal, while BR-29 and Nipponbare rice species are the best option for arsenic phytoremediation.
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Oral dosing in adult zebrafish: proof-of-concept using pharmacokinetics and pharmacological evaluation of carbamazepine.
Pharmacol Rep
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2014
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We describe a method for obtaining pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacology data from adult zebrafish in terms of mg/kg using a novel method of oral administration. Using carbamazepine (CBZ) as a test drug, we employed dried blood spot (DBS) cards to enable drug quantification for PK; and we evaluated the pharmacological anxiolytic effect using novel tank test.
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Structure and composition of biofilm communities in a moving bed biofilm reactor for nitritation-anammox at low temperatures.
Bioresour. Technol.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2014
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It is a challenge to apply anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) for nitrogen removal from wastewater at low temperatures. Maintenance of anammox- and aerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and suppression of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) are key issues. In this work, a nitritation-anammox moving bed biofilm pilot reactor was operated at 19-10°C for 300 d. Nitrogen removal was decreasing, but stable, at 19-13°C. At 10°C removal became unstable. Quantitative PCR, fluorescence in situ hybridization and gene sequencing showed that no major microbial community changes were observed with decreased temperature. Anammox bacteria dominated the biofilm (0.9-1.2 × 10(14) 16S rRNA copies m(-2)). Most anammox bacteria were similar to Brocadia sp. 40, but another smaller Brocadia population was present near the biofilm-water interface, where also the AOB community (Nitrosomonas) was concentrated in thin layers (1.8-5.3 × 10(12) amoA copies m(-2)). NOB (Nitrobacter, Nitrospira) were always present at low concentrations (<1.3 × 10(11) 16S rRNA copies m(-2)).
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Outcomes in multiple gestation pregnancies among Canadian women age 35 years and older.
Healthc Q
PUBLISHED: 11-26-2011
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Multiple gestations are associated with an increased risk of maternal morbidity and mortality independent of maternal age. Previous reports by the Canadian Institute for Health Information established the overall association between advanced maternal age and complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. This article takes a more focused look at the association between advanced maternal age and maternal outcomes in multiple gestation pregnancies. We found, for mothers aged 35 years and older carrying multiples--after adjusting for mothers parity, neighbourhood income and residence (rural/urban)--an increased risk of pregnancy complications including pre-existing hypertension, gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, gestational diabetes and placenta previa and an increased risk for Caesarean delivery.
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A Sandmeyer type reaction for bromination of 2-mercapto-1-methyl-imidazoline (N2C4H6S) into 2-bromo-1-methyl-imidazole (N2C4H5Br) in presence of copper(I) bromide.
Dalton Trans
PUBLISHED: 09-29-2011
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2-Mercapto-1-methyl-imidazoline (N(2)C(4)H(6)S) is converted at room temperature into 2-bromo-1-methyl-imidazole (N(2)C(4)H(5)Br) in presence of copper(I) bromide in acetonitrile-chloroform mixture via extrusion of sulfur as sulfate and oxidation of Cu(I) into Cu(II). 2-Bromo-1-methyl-imidazole was isolated as its self assembled tetranuclear Cu(II) cluster, [Cu(4)(?(1)-N-(N(2)C(4)H(5)Br)(4)(?(4)-O)(?-Br)(6)] 1 {?(1)-N-(N(2)C(4)H(5)Br) = 2-bromo-1-methyl-imidazole}.
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Metal mediated C-S rupture of heterocyclic thioamides: in situ generation of 2,2-thio-di-2-imidazoline, 1,1-dimethyl-2,2-di-imidazolylsulfide, SO4(2-) and their variable coordination to Cu(II).
Dalton Trans
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2010
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Reactions of copper(I) halides with imidazolidine-2-thione and 1-methyl-1,3-imidazoline-2-thione in dmso involved C-S rupture in aerobic conditions and yielded a sulfate bridged polymer, [Cu(II){eta(2)-N,N-(N(2)C(3)H(5))(2)S}(mu-O,OSO(2))(eta(1)-OH(2))](n) 1 and a sulfate chelated monomer, [Cu(II){eta(2)-N,N-(N(2)C(4)H(5))(2)S}(eta(2)-O,OSO(2))(eta(1)-OH(2))] 2 {N,N-(N(2)C(3)H(5))(2)S = 2,2-thio-di-2-imidazoline, N,N-(N(2)C(4)H(5))(2)S = 1,1-dimethyl-2,2-di-imidazolyl sulfide}. This variable coordination behavior of in situ generated sulfate is unprecedented in the literature.
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DNA methyltransferases 1, 3a, and 3b overexpression and clinical significance in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.
Hum. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2010
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The alteration of DNA methylation is one of the most common epigenetic changes in human cancers. Three genes, namely, DNA methyltransferase 1, 3a, and 3b, which code for DNA methyltransferases that affect promoter methylation status, are thought to play an important role in the development of cancers and may be good anticancer therapy targets. The methylation of tumor suppressor genes has been reported in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors; however, there have been no studies about DNA methyltransferase protein expression and its clinical significance in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. In this study, the expression of DNA methyltransferase 1, 3a, and 3b was studied in 63 gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors by immunohistochemistry. The expression of DNA methyltransferase 1, 3a, and 3b was frequently detected in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (87%, 81%, and 75%, respectively). The DNA methyltransferase 3a expression level was significantly higher in poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas than in well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors or well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (P < .01 and P < .05, respectively). The expression of DNA methyltransferase 1, 3a, and 3b showed significantly higher levels in stage IV tumors than in stage I or II tumors. In addition, the expression levels of DNA methyltransferase 1, 3a, and 3b were positively correlated with the MIB-1 labeling index in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (R = 0.293, P = .019; R = 0.457, P = .001; and R = 0.249, P = .049; respectively). In addition, the expression levels and positive immunostaining frequencies of DNA methyltransferase 3a and 3b were significantly lower in midgut neuroendocrine tumors than in foregut or hindgut neuroendocrine tumors. Our findings suggest that the overexpression of DNA methyltransferase 1, 3a, and 3b is related to tumorigenesis and the progression of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.
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Effects of heat treatment on the bioactivity of surface-modified titanium in calcium solution.
Biomed Mater Eng
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2009
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The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of heat treatment on the bioactivity of hydrothermal-modified titanium in CaO solution for improved bioactivity by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The hydrothermal treatment of titanium in CaO solution was performed at 121 degrees C at 0.2 MPa for 1 h in an autoclave followed by 1 h heat treatments at 200, 400, 600 and 800 degrees C simultaneously. The bioactivity of titanium was evaluated by hydroxyapatite precipitation during immersion in SBF. Surface microstructure changes after the heat treatments and immersion in SBF were determined by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Heat treatments at high temperatures (600 and 800 degrees C) promoted the synthesis of anatase, increased the thickness of the titanium oxide layer on the modified titanium surface and promoted the synthesis of calcium titanate, which possibly promoted the precipitation of apatite in SBF. The extent of precipitations increased with the time of immersion in SBF and the temperature of the heat treatment. Island-like deposits of needle-like crystals were observed only on the surface of the 600 and 800 degrees C heat-treated specimens after two or four week immersions in SBF. The results suggested that treatments of the surface of hydrothermal-treated titanium specimens at high temperatures (600 and 800 degrees C) could be effective for the surface modification of titanium as an implant material offering better osseointegration.
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A new genus and species of the family rhabdolaimidae (nematoda), with descriptions of two known species and taxonomic discussion.
J. Nematol.
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A new genus, one new and two known species belonging to family Rhabdolaimidae are described and illustrated. Mediolaimus n. gen. is characterized by small-sized body; papilliform outer labial and cephalic sensilla; long, tubular stoma with stegostom having relatively larger dorsal and smaller sub ventral denticles at same level; cylindrical pharynx with expanded basal bulb having thickened lumen; didelphic gonad having outstretched ovaries; elongate-conoid tail with hemispherical terminus without mucro or spinneret and caudal glands obscure. Mediolaimus obtusicaudatus n. gen. n. sp. is characterized by stoma with a relatively larger dorsal denticle and two fine subventral denticles at same level; amphidelphic reproductive system with outstretched ovaries; tail elongate conoid with smooth hemispherical terminus and absence of male. Rhabdolaimus terrestrisde Man, 1880 and Udonchus tenuicaudatusCobb, 1913 are described with additional details. The inter population variations are discussed in the latter species along with a detailed note on the status of Rhabdolaimidae and its proposed placement under superfamily Rhabdolaimoidea of suborder Campydorina.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.