JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Director field model of the primary visual cortex for contour detection.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We aim to build the simplest possible model capable of detecting long, noisy contours in a cluttered visual scene. For this, we model the neural dynamics in the primate primary visual cortex in terms of a continuous director field that describes the average rate and the average orientational preference of active neurons at a particular point in the cortex. We then use a linear-nonlinear dynamical model with long range connectivity patterns to enforce long-range statistical context present in the analyzed images. The resulting model has substantially fewer degrees of freedom than traditional models, and yet it can distinguish large contiguous objects from the background clutter by suppressing the clutter and by filling-in occluded elements of object contours. This results in high-precision, high-recall detection of large objects in cluttered scenes. Parenthetically, our model has a direct correspondence with the Landau - de Gennes theory of nematic liquid crystal in two dimensions.
Related JoVE Video
Phenotypic assortment mediates the effect of social selection in a wild beetle population.
Evolution
PUBLISHED: 06-09-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Social interactions often have major fitness consequences, but little is known about how specific interacting phenotypes affect the strength of natural selection. Social influences on the evolutionary process can be assessed using a multilevel selection approach that partitions the effects of social partner phenotypes on fitness (referred to as social or group selection) from those of the traits of a focal individual (nonsocial or individual selection). To quantify the contribution of social selection to total selection affecting a trait, the patterns of phenotypic association among interactants must also be considered. We estimated selection gradients on male body size in a wild population of forked fungus beetles (Bolitotherus cornutus). We detected positive nonsocial selection and negative social selection on body size operating through differences in copulation success, indicating that large males with small social partners had highest fitness. In addition, we found that, in low-density demes, the phenotypes of focal individuals were negatively correlated with those of their social partners. This pattern reversed the negative effect of group selection on body size and led to stronger positive selection for body size. Our results demonstrate multilevel selection in nature and stress the importance of considering social selection whenever conspecific interactions occur nonrandomly.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.