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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Integrative genomics reveals novel molecular pathways and gene networks for coronary artery disease.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2014
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The majority of the heritability of coronary artery disease (CAD) remains unexplained, despite recent successes of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in identifying novel susceptibility loci. Integrating functional genomic data from a variety of sources with a large-scale meta-analysis of CAD GWAS may facilitate the identification of novel biological processes and genes involved in CAD, as well as clarify the causal relationships of established processes. Towards this end, we integrated 14 GWAS from the CARDIoGRAM Consortium and two additional GWAS from the Ottawa Heart Institute (25,491 cases and 66,819 controls) with 1) genetics of gene expression studies of CAD-relevant tissues in humans, 2) metabolic and signaling pathways from public databases, and 3) data-driven, tissue-specific gene networks from a multitude of human and mouse experiments. We not only detected CAD-associated gene networks of lipid metabolism, coagulation, immunity, and additional networks with no clear functional annotation, but also revealed key driver genes for each CAD network based on the topology of the gene regulatory networks. In particular, we found a gene network involved in antigen processing to be strongly associated with CAD. The key driver genes of this network included glyoxalase I (GLO1) and peptidylprolyl isomerase I (PPIL1), which we verified as regulatory by siRNA experiments in human aortic endothelial cells. Our results suggest genetic influences on a diverse set of both known and novel biological processes that contribute to CAD risk. The key driver genes for these networks highlight potential novel targets for further mechanistic studies and therapeutic interventions.
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EPIQ-efficient detection of SNP-SNP epistatic interactions for quantitative traits.
Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2014
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Gene-gene interactions are of potential biological and medical interest, as they can shed light on both the inheritance mechanism of a trait and on the underlying biological mechanisms. Evidence of epistatic interactions has been reported in both humans and other organisms. Unlike single-locus genome-wide association studies (GWAS), which proved efficient in detecting numerous genetic loci related with various traits, interaction-based GWAS have so far produced very few reproducible discoveries. Such studies introduce a great computational and statistical burden by necessitating a large number of hypotheses to be tested including all pairs of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Thus, many software tools have been developed for interaction-based case-control studies, some leading to reliable discoveries. For quantitative data, on the other hand, only a handful of tools exist, and the computational burden is still substantial.
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Abnormal splicing of NEDD4 in myotonic dystrophy type 2: possible link to statin adverse reactions.
Am. J. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2014
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Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is a multisystemic disorder caused by a (CCTG)n repeat expansion in intron 1 of CNBP. Transcription of the repeats causes a toxic RNA gain of function involving their accumulation in ribonuclear foci. This leads to sequestration of splicing factors and alters pre-mRNA splicing in a range of downstream effector genes, which is thought to contribute to the diverse DM2 clinical features. Hyperlipidemia is frequent in DM2 patients, but the treatment is problematic because of an increased risk of statin-induced adverse reactions. Hypothesizing that shared pathways lead to the increased risk, we compared the skeletal muscle expression profiles of DM2 patients and controls with patients with hyperlipidemia on statin therapy. Neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated-4 (NEDD4), an ubiquitin ligase, was one of the dysregulated genes identified in DM2 patients and patients with statin-treated hyperlipidemia. In DM2 muscle, NEDD4 mRNA was abnormally spliced, leading to aberrant NEDD4 proteins. NEDD4 was down-regulated in persons taking statins, and simvastatin treatment of C2C12 cells suppressed NEDD4 transcription. Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), an established NEDD4 target, was increased and accumulated in highly atrophic DM2 muscle fibers. PTEN ubiquitination was reduced in DM2 myofibers, suggesting that the NEDD4-PTEN pathway is dysregulated in DM2 skeletal muscle. Thus, this pathway may contribute to the increased risk of statin-adverse reactions in patients with DM2.
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Blood microRNA profile associates with the levels of serum lipids and metabolites associated with glucose metabolism and insulin resistance and pinpoints pathways underlying metabolic syndrome: the cardiovascular risk in Young Finns Study.
Mol. Cell. Endocrinol.
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2014
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Since metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a collection of cardiovascular risk factors involving multiple signaling systems, we related the metabolic abnormalities associated with MetS with circulating microRNA profiles to pinpoint the affected signaling pathways. The blood microRNA profile, genome wide gene expression and serum NMR metabolomics were analyzed from 71 participants of the Young Finns Study. We found nine microRNAs that associated significantly with metabolites connected to MetS. MicroRNA-144-5p concentration correlated with glucose levels, hsa-1207-5p with glycosylated hemoglobin and hsa-miR-484 with metabolites related to insulin resistance. Hsa-miR-625-3p correlated with cholesterol levels, hsa-miR-1237-3p and hsa-miR-331-3p expression with certain fatty acids levels and hsa-miR-129-1-3p, -129-2-3p, and -1288-3p with glycerol levels. The down-regulated targets of miR-1207-5p and -129-2-3p were enriched in PI3K and MAPK pathways and 8 out of the 12 enriched pathways were down-regulated in individuals with MetS. In conclusion microRNAs associated with several aspects of MetS, possibly regulating glucose and lipid metabolism.
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Drug-induced rhabdomyolysis: from systems pharmacology analysis to biochemical flux.
Chem. Res. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2014
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The goal of this study was to integrate systems pharmacology and biochemical flux to delineate drug-induced rhabdomyolysis by leveraging prior knowledge and publicly accessible data. A list of 211 rhabdomyolysis-inducing drugs (RIDs) was compiled and curated from multiple sources. Extended pharmacological network analysis revealed that the intermediators directly interacting with the pharmacological targets of RIDs were significantly enriched with functions such as regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. A total of 78 intermediators were shown to be significantly connected to at least five RIDs, including estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1), synuclein gamma (SNCG), and janus kinase 2 (JAK2). Transcriptomic analysis of RIDs profiled in Connectivity Map on the global scale revealed that multiple pathways are perturbed by RIDs, including ErbB signaling and lipid metabolism pathways, and that carnitine palmitoyl transferase 2 (CPT2) was in the top 1 percent of the most differentially perturbed genes. CPT2 was downregulated by nine drugs that perturbed the genes significantly enriched in oxidative phosphorylation and energy-metabolism pathways. With statins as the use case, biochemical pathway analysis on the local scale implicated a role for CPT2 in statin-induced perturbation of energy homeostasis, which is in agreement with reports of statin-CPT2 interaction. Considering the complexity of human biology, an integrative multiple-approach analysis composed of a biochemical flux network, pharmacological on- and off-target networks, and transcriptomic signature is important for understanding drug safety and for providing insight into clinical gene-drug interactions.
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Upstream Transcription Factor 1 (USF1) allelic variants regulate lipoprotein metabolism in women and USF1 expression in atherosclerotic plaque.
Sci Rep
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2014
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Upstream transcription factor 1 (USF1) allelic variants significantly influence future risk of cardiovascular disease and overall mortality in females. We investigated sex-specific effects of USF1 gene allelic variants on serum indices of lipoprotein metabolism, early markers of asymptomatic atherosclerosis and their changes during six years of follow-up. In addition, we investigated the cis-regulatory role of these USF1 variants in artery wall tissues in Caucasians. In the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study, 1,608 participants (56% women, aged 31.9 ± 4.9) with lipids and cIMT data were included. For functional study, whole genome mRNA expression profiling was performed in 91 histologically classified atherosclerotic samples. In females, serum total, LDL cholesterol and apoB levels increased gradually according to USF1 rs2516839 genotypes TT < CT < CC and rs1556259 AA < AG < GG as well as according to USF1 H3 (GCCCGG) copy number 0 < 1 < 2. Furthermore, the carriers of minor alleles of rs2516839 (C) and rs1556259 (G) of USF1 gene had decreased USF1 expression in atherosclerotic plaques (P = 0.028 and 0.08, respectively) as compared to non-carriers. The genetic variation in USF1 influence USF1 transcript expression in advanced atherosclerosis and regulates levels and metabolism of circulating apoB and apoB-containing lipoprotein particles in sex-dependent manner, but is not a major determinant of early markers of atherosclerosis.
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Molecular Lipids Identify Cardiovascular Risk and Are Efficiently Lowered by Simvastatin and PCSK9 Deficiency.
J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 12-20-2013
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Context: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Traditional risk markers explain only a proportion of total cardiovascular risk. Thus, development and improvement of early diagnostic strategies and targeted initiation of preventive measures would be of great benefit. Objective: We aimed to identify molecular lipids that are associated with fatal outcome of CAD patients. Furthermore, the effect of different lipid-lowering drugs on novel risk lipids was evaluated. Methods: Serum samples of 445 CAD subjects participating in a long-term follow-up of the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health (LURIC) study were analyzed. In addition, samples obtained from a separate randomized parallel three-group study of subjects treated with simvastatin (n = 24), ezetimibe (n = 24), or their combination (n = 24) were studied. Furthermore, samples from the LURIC participants with a loss-of-function mutation (R46L) in the PCSK9 gene (n = 19) were analyzed and compared with major allele carriers (n = 868). Results: Distinct ceramide species were significantly associated with the fatal outcome of CAD patients. Simvastatin lowered plasma ceramides broadly by about 25%, but no changes in ceramides were observed in the ezetimibe group. PCSK9 deficiency was significantly associated (-13%) with lowered low-density lipoprotein cholesterol accompanied by a significant 20% reduction in CAD outcome risk-related ceramides. Conclusions: These data suggest that distinct ceramides associate significantly with CAD outcome independently of traditional risk factors and that the mechanism of lipid lowering is important.
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Genome-wide association study on dimethylarginines reveals novel AGXT2 variants associated with heart rate variability but not with overall mortality.
Eur. Heart J.
PUBLISHED: 10-24-2013
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The purpose of this study was to identify novel genetic variants influencing circulating asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) levels and to evaluate whether they have a prognostic value on cardiovascular mortality.
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Association of Neuroimmune Guidance Cue Netrin-1 and Its Chemorepulsive Receptor UNC5B With Atherosclerotic Plaque Expression Signatures and Stability in Human(s): Tampere Vascular Study (TVS).
Circ Cardiovasc Genet
PUBLISHED: 10-11-2013
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Background- Macrophage (M?) infiltration and smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation are hallmarks of atherosclerosis and unstable plaques. Neuroimmune guidance cue 1 (netrin-1 [NTN1]) plays a critical role controlling M? trafficking and SMC activation. Characterization of expression of NTN1 and its receptors and their association with plaque stability in human(s) is lacking. Methods and Results- The expression of NTN1 and its receptors did not differ in either whole blood or circulating monocytes from patients with coronary artery disease (n=55) compared with healthy controls (n=45). However, NTN1 was downregulated (-2.9-fold; P<0.0001) and UNC5B upregulated (2.2-fold; P<0.0001) in atherosclerotic plaques (n=68), whereas there were no differences in other NTN1 receptors compared with histologically normal controls (n=28). Increased UNC5B expression is associated with histologically more stable plaques (P=0.011). NTN1 expression correlated positively with SMC markers and signatures and negatively with inflammatory markers and M1 and especially M2 signatures in the atherosclerotic plaques. UNC5B clustering correlated positively with inflammatory and M? markers. NTN1 protein colocalized with CD68-positive cells of monocytic origin and muscle-actin-specific-antibody (HHF3)-positive cells indicative of SMCs in the plaques and only with SMCs in the control samples. NTN1 protein was highly expressed in the intimal layer of the control vessels. Conclusions- Present findings provide support for the hypothesis that dysregulation of expression of NTN1 in SMCs and its chemorepulsive receptor UNC5B in macrophages are involved in the development of atherosclerosis and unstable plaques.
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Relation of genetic profile and novel circulating biomarkers with coronary plaque phenotype as determined by intravascular ultrasound: rationale and design of the ATHEROREMO-IVUS study.
EuroIntervention
PUBLISHED: 09-26-2013
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Aims: The European Collaborative Project on Inflammation and Vascular Wall Remodeling in Atherosclerosis - Intravascular Ultrasound (ATHEROREMO-IVUS) study aims to investigate the relations of genetic profile and novel circulating biomarkers with coronary plaque phenotype and vulnerability as determined by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Methods and results: ATHEROREMO-IVUS is a prospective, observational cohort study of 846 patients with stable angina pectoris or acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who are referred for coronary angiography. Prior to the catheterisation procedure, blood samples are drawn for biomarker measurements and genetic analyses. During the catheterisation procedure, IVUS is performed in a non-culprit coronary artery. The primary endpoint is the presence of vulnerable plaque as determined by IVUS virtual histology. Secondary endpoints include the incidence of major adverse cardiac events during long-term follow-up. Conclusions: Results from ATHEROREMO-IVUS are expected to improve our knowledge of the role of genetic profile and circulating biomarkers in relation to the development of atherosclerosis and vulnerable plaques. Assessment and early validation of the prognostic value of novel biomarkers and intracoronary imaging techniques will be performed. (Clinicaltrials.gov number: NCT01789411).
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Genome-wide association study identifies 3 genomic loci significantly associated with serum levels of homoarginine: the AtheroRemo Consortium.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet
PUBLISHED: 09-18-2013
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Low serum levels of the amino acid derivative, homoarginine, have been associated with increased risk of total and cardiovascular mortality. Homoarginine deficiency may be related to renal and heart diseases, but the pathophysiologic role of homoarginine and the genetic regulation of its serum levels are largely unknown.
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Lipidomics in drug discovery.
Drug Discov. Today
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2013
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Lipidomics is a rapidly growing technology that can be used in biomedical research to study disease mechanisms, identify novel disease biomarkers and drug efficacy biomarkers, and reveal off-target effects. Lipidomics can also be used to elucidate the mechanism of action of different drug compounds or as readouts in Mendelian randomization approaches. Furthermore, lipidomics can be utilized to identify deviations in metabolic and/or signaling pathways in different stages of disease. Therefore, as we discuss here, this emerging technology also has a substantial potential in various drug discovery programs.
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Beyond LDL-C lowering: distinct molecular sphingolipids are good indicators of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) deficiency.
Atherosclerosis
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2013
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Inhibition of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) has been proposed to be a potential new therapeutic target for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia. However, little is known about the effects of PCSK9 inhibition on the lipidome.
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Genetic predisposition to higher blood pressure increases coronary artery disease risk.
Hypertension
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2013
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Hypertension is a risk factor for coronary artery disease. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified 30 genetic variants associated with higher blood pressure at genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10(-8)). If elevated blood pressure is a causative factor for coronary artery disease, these variants should also increase coronary artery disease risk. Analyzing genome-wide association data from 22 233 coronary artery disease cases and 64 762 controls, we observed in the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome-Wide Replication And Meta-Analysis (CARDIoGRAM) consortium that 88% of these blood pressure-associated polymorphisms were likewise positively associated with coronary artery disease, that is, they had an odds ratio >1 for coronary artery disease, a proportion much higher than expected by chance (P=4 × 10(-5)). The average relative coronary artery disease risk increase per each of the multiple blood pressure-raising alleles observed in the consortium was 3.0% for systolic blood pressure-associated polymorphisms (95% confidence interval, 1.8%-4.3%) and 2.9% for diastolic blood pressure-associated polymorphisms (95% confidence interval, 1.7%-4.1%). In substudies, individuals carrying most systolic blood pressure- and diastolic blood pressure-related risk alleles (top quintile of a genetic risk score distribution) had 70% (95% confidence interval, 50%-94%) and 59% (95% confidence interval, 40%-81%) higher odds of having coronary artery disease, respectively, as compared with individuals in the bottom quintile. In conclusion, most blood pressure-associated polymorphisms also confer an increased risk for coronary artery disease. These findings are consistent with a causal relationship of increasing blood pressure to coronary artery disease. Genetic variants primarily affecting blood pressure contribute to the genetic basis of coronary artery disease.
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Bacterial signatures in thrombus aspirates of patients with myocardial infarction.
Circulation
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2013
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Infectious agents, especially bacteria and their components originating from the oral cavity or respiratory tract, have been suggested to contribute to inflammation in the coronary plaque, leading to rupture and the subsequent development of coronary thrombus. We aimed to measure bacterial DNA in thrombus aspirates of patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction and to check for a possible association between bacteria findings and oral pathology in the same cohort.
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A disintegrin and metalloprotease -8 and -15 and susceptibility for ascending aortic dissection.
Scand. J. Clin. Lab. Invest.
PUBLISHED: 07-06-2011
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BACKGROUND. Dilatation of the ascending aorta (AA) is affected by extra-cellular matrix modifications and inflammation. A disintegrin and metalloproteases (ADAMs) may reveal differences between AA and ascending aortic dissection (AD). We characterized the inflammatory histology of AD and AA and examined the role of ADAM8 and -15 in these diseases. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Aortic wall histology and immunohistochemistry for leukocytes, T- and B-lymphocytes, plasma cells, macrophages, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, cell proliferation, elastase and Van-Gieson-staining were performed to 40 consecutive patients that underwent surgery for AA or AD. The expressions of ADAM8 and -15 mRNA and proteins were evaluated using QRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS. Thirty-four patients were enrolled, of which 29 had AA and five had AD of the ascending aorta. B-cells throughout the aortic wall and intimal plasma cells were more numerous during AD as compared with AA (p < 0.05). The gene expressions for ADAM8 and -15 were notably lower in AA as compared with AD. The median for down-regulation of ADAM8 and -15 in AA was -2.7 and -1.8, respectively. ADAM8 and -15 were mainly found in the media layer in patients with AD. Two of the patients with AA and increased ADAMs developed AD of the remaining aorta. CONCLUSIONS. The involvement of ADAM8 and -15 together with inflammation consisting of B-cells may indicate active remodelling of the aortic wall leading to AD.
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Clinical response to statins: mechanism(s) of variable activity and adverse effects.
Ann. Med.
PUBLISHED: 05-31-2011
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Statins represent a major advance in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, a significant risk factor for atherosclerosis. There is, however, notable interindividual variation in the cholesterolemic response to statins, and the origin of this variability is poorly understood; pharmacogenetics has attempted to determine the role of genetic factors. Myopathy, further, has been reported in a considerable percentage of patients, but the mechanisms underlying muscle injury have yet to be fully characterized. Most statins are the substrates of several cytochrome P450s (CYP). CYP polymorphisms may be responsible for variations in hypolipidemic activity; inhibitors of CYPs, e.g. of CYP3A4, can significantly raise plasma concentrations of several statins, but consequences in terms of clinical efficacy are not uniform. Pravastatin and rosuvastatin are not susceptible to CYP inhibition but are substrates of the organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1, encoded by the SLCO1B1 gene. Essentially all statins are, in fact, substrates of membrane transporters: SLCO1B1 polymorphisms can decrease the liver uptake, as well as the therapeutic potential of these agents, and may be linked to their muscular side-effects. A better understanding of the mechanisms of statin handling will help to minimize adverse effects and interactions, as well as to improve their lipid-lowering efficiency.
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Novel associations for coronary artery disease derived from genome wide association studies are not associated with increased carotid intima-media thickness, suggesting they do not act via early atherosclerosis or vessel remodeling.
Atherosclerosis
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2011
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Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified associations with myocardial infarction and coronary artery disease (CAD), but the mechanisms underlying these associations remain largely unclear. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) is a measure of early arterial remodeling and arteriosclerosis. Therefore, if CAD associated SNPs are also associated with carotid IMT; it suggests that they are acting via the early stages of the atherosclerotic process.
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miR-21, miR-210, miR-34a, and miR-146a/b are up-regulated in human atherosclerotic plaques in the Tampere Vascular Study.
Atherosclerosis
PUBLISHED: 05-24-2011
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MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that inversely regulate their target gene expression. The whole miRNA profile of human atherosclerotic plaques has not been studied previously. The aim of this study was to investigate the miRNA expression profile in human atherosclerotic plaques as compared to non-atherosclerotic left internal thoracic arteries (LITA), and to connect this expression to the processes in atherosclerosis.
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Common variation in the ADAM8 gene affects serum sADAM8 concentrations and the risk of myocardial infarction in two independent cohorts.
Atherosclerosis
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2011
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The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2995300 in the metalloproteinase-disintegrin gene ADAM8 has been shown to affect the areas of complicated coronary plaques and the risk of fatal myocardial infarction (MI) in men. This study was set up to further investigate the role of ADAM8 in MI.
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Large-scale association analysis identifies 13 new susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease.
Heribert Schunkert, Inke R König, Sekar Kathiresan, Muredach P Reilly, Themistocles L Assimes, Hilma Holm, Michael Preuss, Alexandre F R Stewart, Maja Barbalic, Christian Gieger, Devin Absher, Zouhair Aherrahrou, Hooman Allayee, David Altshuler, Sonia S Anand, Karl Andersen, Jeffrey L Anderson, Diego Ardissino, Stephen G Ball, Anthony J Balmforth, Timothy A Barnes, Diane M Becker, Lewis C Becker, Klaus Berger, Joshua C Bis, S Matthijs Boekholdt, Eric Boerwinkle, Peter S Braund, Morris J Brown, Mary Susan Burnett, Ian Buysschaert, , John F Carlquist, Li Chen, Sven Cichon, Veryan Codd, Robert W Davies, George Dedoussis, Abbas Dehghan, Serkalem Demissie, Joseph M Devaney, Patrick Diemert, Ron Do, Angela Doering, Sandra Eifert, Nour Eddine El Mokhtari, Stephen G Ellis, Roberto Elosua, James C Engert, Stephen E Epstein, Ulf de Faire, Marcus Fischer, Aaron R Folsom, Jennifer Freyer, Bruna Gigante, Domenico Girelli, Solveig Gretarsdottir, Vilmundur Gudnason, Jeffrey R Gulcher, Eran Halperin, Naomi Hammond, Stanley L Hazen, Albert Hofman, Benjamin D Horne, Thomas Illig, Carlos Iribarren, Gregory T Jones, J Wouter Jukema, Michael A Kaiser, Lee M Kaplan, John J P Kastelein, Kay-Tee Khaw, Joshua W Knowles, Genovefa Kolovou, Augustine Kong, Reijo Laaksonen, Diether Lambrechts, Karin Leander, Guillaume Lettre, Mingyao Li, Wolfgang Lieb, Christina Loley, Andrew J Lotery, Pier M Mannucci, Seraya Maouche, Nicola Martinelli, Pascal P McKeown, Christa Meisinger, Thomas Meitinger, Olle Melander, Pier Angelica Merlini, Vincent Mooser, Thomas Morgan, Thomas W Mühleisen, Joseph B Muhlestein, Thomas Münzel, Kiran Musunuru, Janja Nahrstaedt, Christopher P Nelson, Markus M Nöthen, Oliviero Olivieri, Riyaz S Patel, Chris C Patterson, Annette Peters, Flora Peyvandi, Liming Qu, Arshed A Quyyumi, Daniel J Rader, Loukianos S Rallidis, Catherine Rice, Frits R Rosendaal, Diana Rubin, Veikko Salomaa, M Lourdes Sampietro, Manj S Sandhu, Eric Schadt, Arne Schäfer, Arne Schillert, Stefan Schreiber, Jürgen Schrezenmeir, Stephen M Schwartz, David S Siscovick, Mohan Sivananthan, Suthesh Sivapalaratnam, Albert Smith, Tamara B Smith, Jaapjan D Snoep, Nicole Soranzo, John A Spertus, Klaus Stark, Kathy Stirrups, Monika Stoll, W H Wilson Tang, Stephanie Tennstedt, Gudmundur Thorgeirsson, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Maciej Tomaszewski, André G Uitterlinden, Andre M van Rij, Benjamin F Voight, Nick J Wareham, George A Wells, H-Erich Wichmann, Philipp S Wild, Christina Willenborg, Jaqueline C M Witteman, Benjamin J Wright, Shu Ye, Tanja Zeller, Andreas Ziegler, Francois Cambien, Alison H Goodall, L Adrienne Cupples, Thomas Quertermous, Winfried März, Christian Hengstenberg, Stefan Blankenberg, Willem H Ouwehand, Alistair S Hall, Panos Deloukas, John R Thompson, Kari Stefansson, Robert Roberts, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Christopher J O'Donnell, Ruth McPherson, Jeanette Erdmann, Nilesh J Samani.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2011
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We performed a meta-analysis of 14 genome-wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD) comprising 22,233 individuals with CAD (cases) and 64,762 controls of European descent followed by genotyping of top association signals in 56,682 additional individuals. This analysis identified 13 loci newly associated with CAD at P < 5 × 10?? and confirmed the association of 10 of 12 previously reported CAD loci. The 13 new loci showed risk allele frequencies ranging from 0.13 to 0.91 and were associated with a 6% to 17% increase in the risk of CAD per allele. Notably, only three of the new loci showed significant association with traditional CAD risk factors and the majority lie in gene regions not previously implicated in the pathogenesis of CAD. Finally, five of the new CAD risk loci appear to have pleiotropic effects, showing strong association with various other human diseases or traits.
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Proprotein convertases in human atherosclerotic plaques: the overexpression of FURIN and its substrate cytokines BAFF and APRIL.
Atherosclerosis
PUBLISHED: 02-09-2011
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Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin (PCSK) enzymes cleave proproteins into mature end products. Previously, MBTPS1 and PCSK9 have been shown to regulate cholesterol metabolism and LDL receptor recycling, whereas FURIN and PCSK5 have been suggested to inactivate lipases and regulate inflammation in atherosclerosis. Here, we systematically analyzed the expression of PCSKs and their targets in advanced atherosclerotic plaques.
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Niemann-Pick type C fibroblasts have a distinct microRNA profile related to lipid metabolism and certain cellular components.
Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
PUBLISHED: 10-15-2010
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MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level. Dysregulation of miRNA expression may lead to severe pathophysiologies in human cells. Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a complex lipid storage disease characterized by late endosomal-lysosomal accumulation of multiple lipid molecules. Our aim was to characterize the miRNA profile in NPC fibroblasts as they may play an active role in the NPC disease associated changes in the cellular physiology. To investigate the miRNA expression, total RNAs were isolated from cultured human NPC fibroblasts and healthy fibroblasts and then, TaqMan Low-Density Array system containing 365 mature human miRNAs was used. Expression differences between the healthy and NPC cells were detected according to the relative quantification values. Target genes were predicted by using three different algorithms and classified regarding NPC related biological processes and cellular components. We found that three miRNAs, miR-196a, miR-196b and miR-296 were up-regulated (>3.5-fold increase, p<0.05) whereas 38 miRNAs were significantly down-regulated in NPC cells (>3.5-fold decrease, p<0.05). Among these non-coding RNAs, miR-98 was the most down-regulated (-33.3-fold) miRNA and miR-143, the lipid biosynthesis associated miRNA, had a 20-fold decreased expression in the NPC cells. Additionally, gene ontology analyses of the target genes suggested a distinct role for each miRNA. Our results show that NPC fibroblasts have an altered miRNA expression profile and certain miRNAs have importance in disease pathogenesis as well as the therapeutic capacity to correct lipid related pathophysiologies in the NPC cells.
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Design of the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome-Wide Replication And Meta-Analysis (CARDIoGRAM) Study: A Genome-wide association meta-analysis involving more than 22 000 cases and 60 000 controls.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet
PUBLISHED: 10-05-2010
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Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of myocardial infarction (MI) and other forms of coronary artery disease (CAD) have led to the discovery of at least 13 genetic loci. In addition to the effect size, power to detect associations is largely driven by sample size. Therefore, to maximize the chance of finding novel susceptibility loci for CAD and MI, the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome-wide Replication And Meta-analysis (CARDIoGRAM) consortium was formed.
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Carbonic anhydrases II and XII are up-regulated in osteoclast-like cells in advanced human atherosclerotic plaques-Tampere Vascular Study.
Ann. Med.
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2010
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Carbonic anhydrases (CA) play a central role in osteoclast function and bone remodeling by catalyzing the formation of bicarbonate and proton from carbon dioxide. According to previous histochemical studies, advanced atherosclerotic plaques share similarities with bone. However, whether CAs are expressed in plaques is not known.
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Levels of asymmetrical dimethylarginine are predictive of brachial artery flow-mediated dilation 6 years later. The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.
Atherosclerosis
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2010
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Plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is a novel risk factor for atherosclerosis and has been observed to associate with endothelial function in cross-section studies. In the present study our aim was to investigate whether plasma ADMA levels are predictive of brachial artery endothelial function in a prospective setting.
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Lipidomics: a tool for studies of atherosclerosis.
Curr Atheroscler Rep
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2010
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Lipids, abundant constituents of both the vascular plaque and lipoproteins, play a pivotal role in atherosclerosis. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of lipids, called lipidomics, presents a number of opportunities not only for understanding the cellular processes in health and disease but also in enabling personalized medicine. Lipidomics in its most advanced form is able to quantify hundreds of different molecular lipid species with various structural and functional roles. Unraveling this complexity will improve our understanding of diseases such as atherosclerosis at a level of detail not attainable with classical analytical methods. Improved patient selection, biomarkers for gauging treatment efficacy and safety, and translational models will be facilitated by the lipidomic deliverables. Importantly, lipid-based biomarkers and targets should lead the way as we progress toward more specialized therapeutics.
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The APOE -219G/T and +113G/C polymorphisms affect insulin resistance among Turks.
Metab. Clin. Exp.
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2010
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The -219G/T (rs405509) and +113G/C (rs440446) polymorphisms within the regulatory region of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene have been related to the transcriptional activity of the gene. We examined the effect of the stated polymorphisms and their construct haplotypes with the APOE ?2/?3/?4 polymorphism on lipid levels and insulin resistance in the Turkish Adult Risk Factor Study. Randomly selected 1774 adults (mean age, 55.0 ± 11.7 years; 51.2% women) participating in the population-based Turkish Adult Risk Factor Study were cross-sectionally analyzed for the -219G/T, +113G/C, and ?2/?3/?4 polymorphisms as well as their haplotypes. Insulin resistance was defined as the 70th percentile in the sample (>2.51) of the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA). The frequencies of the -219T and +113C alleles were 0.477 and 0.423, respectively; and those of haplotype 1 (GG?3) and haplotype 2 (TC?3) were 44.1% and 41.9%, respectively. The -219G/T and +113G/C genotypes (both P < .04) and diplotypes of haplotype 2 (TC?3) (P < .014) were inversely related to serum fasting insulin and the HOMA index, even after controlling for 8 relevant covariates, but not to serum lipids. Within the APOE3 group, haplotype 2 (TC-/TC+) heterozygotes had an odds ratio of 0.66 (95% confidence interval, 0.42-0.99) for HOMA of insulin resistance after adjusting for 8 covariates. APOE promoter polymorphisms and their diplotypes are independently related with serum fasting insulin levels and HOMA index among Turks.
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Biological, clinical and population relevance of 95 loci for blood lipids.
Tanya M Teslovich, Kiran Musunuru, Albert V Smith, Andrew C Edmondson, Ioannis M Stylianou, Masahiro Koseki, James P Pirruccello, Samuli Ripatti, Daniel I Chasman, Cristen J Willer, Christopher T Johansen, Sigrid W Fouchier, Aaron Isaacs, Gina M Peloso, Maja Barbalic, Sally L Ricketts, Joshua C Bis, Yurii S Aulchenko, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Mary F Feitosa, John Chambers, Marju Orho-Melander, Olle Melander, Toby Johnson, Xiaohui Li, Xiuqing Guo, Mingyao Li, Yoon Shin Cho, Min Jin Go, Young Jin Kim, Jong-Young Lee, Taesung Park, Kyunga Kim, Xueling Sim, Rick Twee-Hee Ong, Damien C Croteau-Chonka, Leslie A Lange, Joshua D Smith, Kijoung Song, Jing Hua Zhao, Xin Yuan, Jian'an Luan, Claudia Lamina, Andreas Ziegler, Weihua Zhang, Robert Y L Zee, Alan F Wright, Jacqueline C M Witteman, James F Wilson, Gonneke Willemsen, H-Erich Wichmann, John B Whitfield, Dawn M Waterworth, Nicholas J Wareham, Gérard Waeber, Peter Vollenweider, Benjamin F Voight, Veronique Vitart, André G Uitterlinden, Manuela Uda, Jaakko Tuomilehto, John R Thompson, Toshiko Tanaka, Ida Surakka, Heather M Stringham, Tim D Spector, Nicole Soranzo, Johannes H Smit, Juha Sinisalo, Kaisa Silander, Eric J G Sijbrands, Angelo Scuteri, James Scott, David Schlessinger, Serena Sanna, Veikko Salomaa, Juha Saharinen, Chiara Sabatti, Aimo Ruokonen, Igor Rudan, Lynda M Rose, Robert Roberts, Mark Rieder, Bruce M Psaty, Peter P Pramstaller, Irene Pichler, Markus Perola, Brenda W J H Penninx, Nancy L Pedersen, Cristian Pattaro, Alex N Parker, Guillaume Paré, Ben A Oostra, Christopher J O'Donnell, Markku S Nieminen, Deborah A Nickerson, Grant W Montgomery, Thomas Meitinger, Ruth McPherson, Mark I McCarthy, Wendy McArdle, David Masson, Nicholas G Martin, Fabio Marroni, Massimo Mangino, Patrik K E Magnusson, Gavin Lucas, Robert Luben, Ruth J F Loos, Marja-Liisa Lokki, Guillaume Lettre, Claudia Langenberg, Lenore J Launer, Edward G Lakatta, Reijo Laaksonen, Kirsten O Kyvik, Florian Kronenberg, Inke R König, Kay-Tee Khaw, Jaakko Kaprio, Lee M Kaplan, Asa Johansson, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, A Cecile J W Janssens, Erik Ingelsson, Wilmar Igl, G Kees Hovingh, Jouke-Jan Hottenga, Albert Hofman, Andrew A Hicks, Christian Hengstenberg, Iris M Heid, Caroline Hayward, Aki S Havulinna, Nicholas D Hastie, Tamara B Harris, Talin Haritunians, Alistair S Hall, Ulf Gyllensten, Candace Guiducci, Leif C Groop, Elena González, Christian Gieger, Nelson B Freimer, Luigi Ferrucci, Jeanette Erdmann, Paul Elliott, Kenechi G Ejebe, Angela Döring, Anna F Dominiczak, Serkalem Demissie, Panagiotis Deloukas, Eco J C de Geus, Ulf de Faire, Gabriel Crawford, Francis S Collins, Yii-Der I Chen, Mark J Caulfield, Harry Campbell, Noel P Burtt, Lori L Bonnycastle, Dorret I Boomsma, S Matthijs Boekholdt, Richard N Bergman, Inês Barroso, Stefania Bandinelli, Christie M Ballantyne, Themistocles L Assimes, Thomas Quertermous, David Altshuler, Mark Seielstad, Tien Y Wong, E-Shyong Tai, Alan B Feranil, Christopher W Kuzawa, Linda S Adair, Herman A Taylor, Ingrid B Borecki, Stacey B Gabriel, James G Wilson, Hilma Holm, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Vilmundur Gudnason, Ronald M Krauss, Karen L Mohlke, José M Ordovás, Patricia B Munroe, Jaspal S Kooner, Alan R Tall, Robert A Hegele, John J P Kastelein, Eric E Schadt, Jerome I Rotter, Eric Boerwinkle, David P Strachan, Vincent Mooser, Kari Stefansson, Muredach P Reilly, Nilesh J Samani, Heribert Schunkert, L Adrienne Cupples, Manjinder S Sandhu, Paul M Ridker, Daniel J Rader, Cornelia M van Duijn, Leena Peltonen, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Michael Boehnke, Sekar Kathiresan.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2010
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Plasma concentrations of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides are among the most important risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) and are targets for therapeutic intervention. We screened the genome for common variants associated with plasma lipids in >100,000 individuals of European ancestry. Here we report 95 significantly associated loci (P < 5 x 10(-8)), with 59 showing genome-wide significant association with lipid traits for the first time. The newly reported associations include single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near known lipid regulators (for example, CYP7A1, NPC1L1 and SCARB1) as well as in scores of loci not previously implicated in lipoprotein metabolism. The 95 loci contribute not only to normal variation in lipid traits but also to extreme lipid phenotypes and have an impact on lipid traits in three non-European populations (East Asians, South Asians and African Americans). Our results identify several novel loci associated with plasma lipids that are also associated with CAD. Finally, we validated three of the novel genes-GALNT2, PPP1R3B and TTC39B-with experiments in mouse models. Taken together, our findings provide the foundation to develop a broader biological understanding of lipoprotein metabolism and to identify new therapeutic opportunities for the prevention of CAD.
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ADMA concentration changes across the menstrual cycle and during oral contraceptive use: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.
Eur. J. Endocrinol.
PUBLISHED: 11-24-2009
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The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) levels during different menstrual cycle phases in young adult women with or without oral contraceptive (OC) use.
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Suggestive evidence for a new locus for epilepsy with heterogeneous phenotypes on chromosome 17q.
Epilepsy Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2009
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To characterize the clinical features and molecular genetic background in a family with various epilepsy phenotypes including febrile seizures, childhood absence epilepsy, and possible temporal lobe epilepsy.
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ADAM-9, ADAM-15, and ADAM-17 are upregulated in macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic plaques in aorta and carotid and femoral arteries--Tampere vascular study.
Ann. Med.
PUBLISHED: 03-03-2009
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The expression of disintegrin and metalloprotease ADAM-9, ADAM-15, and ADAM-17 has been associated with cell-cell, cell-platelet, and cell-matrix interactions and inflammation. They are possibly implicated in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis.
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Large-scale association analysis identifies new risk loci for coronary artery disease.
, Panos Deloukas, Stavroula Kanoni, Christina Willenborg, Martin Farrall, Themistocles L Assimes, John R Thompson, Erik Ingelsson, Danish Saleheen, Jeanette Erdmann, Benjamin A Goldstein, Kathleen Stirrups, Inke R König, Jean-Baptiste Cazier, Asa Johansson, Alistair S Hall, Jong-Young Lee, Cristen J Willer, John C Chambers, Tonu Esko, Lasse Folkersen, Anuj Goel, Elin Grundberg, Aki S Havulinna, Weang K Ho, Jemma C Hopewell, Niclas Eriksson, Marcus E Kleber, Kati Kristiansson, Per Lundmark, Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen, Suzanne Rafelt, Dmitry Shungin, Rona J Strawbridge, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Emmi Tikkanen, Natalie Van Zuydam, Benjamin F Voight, Lindsay L Waite, Weihua Zhang, Andreas Ziegler, Devin Absher, David Altshuler, Anthony J Balmforth, Inês Barroso, Peter S Braund, Christof Burgdorf, Simone Claudi-Boehm, David Cox, Maria Dimitriou, Ron Do, Alex S F Doney, NourEddine El Mokhtari, Per Eriksson, Krista Fischer, Pierre Fontanillas, Anders Franco-Cereceda, Bruna Gigante, Leif Groop, Stefan Gustafsson, Jörg Hager, Göran Hallmans, Bok-Ghee Han, Sarah E Hunt, Hyun M Kang, Thomas Illig, Thorsten Kessler, Joshua W Knowles, Genovefa Kolovou, Johanna Kuusisto, Claudia Langenberg, Cordelia Langford, Karin Leander, Marja-Liisa Lokki, Anders Lundmark, Mark I McCarthy, Christa Meisinger, Olle Melander, Evelin Mihailov, Seraya Maouche, Andrew D Morris, Martina Müller-Nurasyid, Kjell Nikus, John F Peden, N William Rayner, Asif Rasheed, Silke Rosinger, Diana Rubin, Moritz P Rumpf, Arne Schäfer, Mohan Sivananthan, Ci Song, Alexandre F R Stewart, Sian-Tsung Tan, Gudmundur Thorgeirsson, C Ellen van der Schoot, Peter J Wagner, George A Wells, Philipp S Wild, Tsun-Po Yang, Philippe Amouyel, Dominique Arveiler, Hanneke Basart, Michael Boehnke, Eric Boerwinkle, Paolo Brambilla, Francois Cambien, Adrienne L Cupples, Ulf de Faire, Abbas Dehghan, Patrick Diemert, Stephen E Epstein, Alun Evans, Marco M Ferrario, Jean Ferrières, Dominique Gauguier, Alan S Go, Alison H Goodall, Villi Gudnason, Stanley L Hazen, Hilma Holm, Carlos Iribarren, Yangsoo Jang, Mika Kähönen, Frank Kee, Hyo-Soo Kim, Norman Klopp, Wolfgang Koenig, Wolfgang Kratzer, Kari Kuulasmaa, Markku Laakso, Reijo Laaksonen, Ji-Young Lee, Lars Lind, Willem H Ouwehand, Sarah Parish, Jeong E Park, Nancy L Pedersen, Annette Peters, Thomas Quertermous, Daniel J Rader, Veikko Salomaa, Eric Schadt, Svati H Shah, Juha Sinisalo, Klaus Stark, Kari Stefansson, David-Alexandre Trégouët, Jarmo Virtamo, Lars Wallentin, Nicholas Wareham, Martina E Zimmermann, Markku S Nieminen, Christian Hengstenberg, Manjinder S Sandhu, Tomi Pastinen, Ann-Christine Syvänen, G Kees Hovingh, George Dedoussis, Paul W Franks, Terho Lehtimäki, Andres Metspalu, Pierre A Zalloua, Agneta Siegbahn, Stefan Schreiber, Samuli Ripatti, Stefan S Blankenberg, Markus Perola, Robert Clarke, Bernhard O Boehm, Christopher O'Donnell, Muredach P Reilly, Winfried März, Rory Collins, Sekar Kathiresan, Anders Hamsten, Jaspal S Kooner, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, John Danesh, Colin N A Palmer, Robert Roberts, Hugh Watkins, Heribert Schunkert, Nilesh J Samani.
Nat. Genet.
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Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the commonest cause of death. Here, we report an association analysis in 63,746 CAD cases and 130,681 controls identifying 15 loci reaching genome-wide significance, taking the number of susceptibility loci for CAD to 46, and a further 104 independent variants (r(2) < 0.2) strongly associated with CAD at a 5% false discovery rate (FDR). Together, these variants explain approximately 10.6% of CAD heritability. Of the 46 genome-wide significant lead SNPs, 12 show a significant association with a lipid trait, and 5 show a significant association with blood pressure, but none is significantly associated with diabetes. Network analysis with 233 candidate genes (loci at 10% FDR) generated 5 interaction networks comprising 85% of these putative genes involved in CAD. The four most significant pathways mapping to these networks are linked to lipid metabolism and inflammation, underscoring the causal role of these activities in the genetic etiology of CAD. Our study provides insights into the genetic basis of CAD and identifies key biological pathways.
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A comparison of the accuracy of Illumina HumanHT-12 v3 Expression BeadChip and TaqMan qRT-PCR gene expression results in patient samples from the Tampere Vascular Study.
Atherosclerosis
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This study was set up to compare the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of gene expression results between the Illumina HumanHT-12 v3 Expression BeadChip (GWE) and the TaqMan qRT-PCR low-density array (LDA) in atherosclerotic plaques.
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Modulation of atherogenic lipidome by cigarette smoke in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.
Atherosclerosis
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Although relationships between smoking and cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and between CVD and lipids are established, the direct impact of smoking on lipidomes is not well understood. We investigated the effect of mainstream cigarette smoke (CS) exposure on plasma, liver, and aorta molecular lipid profiles, and liver transcriptome in the ApoE(-/-) mouse, a well-established mouse model for human atherogenesis.
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Novel loci for adiponectin levels and their influence on type 2 diabetes and metabolic traits: a multi-ethnic meta-analysis of 45,891 individuals.
Zari Dastani, Marie-France Hivert, Nicholas Timpson, John R B Perry, Xin Yuan, Robert A Scott, Peter Henneman, Iris M Heid, Jorge R Kizer, Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen, Christian Fuchsberger, Toshiko Tanaka, Andrew P Morris, Kerrin Small, Aaron Isaacs, Marian Beekman, Stefan Coassin, Kurt Lohman, Lu Qi, Stavroula Kanoni, James S Pankow, Hae-Won Uh, Ying Wu, Aurelian Bidulescu, Laura J Rasmussen-Torvik, Celia M T Greenwood, Martin Ladouceur, Jonna Grimsby, Alisa K Manning, Ching-Ti Liu, Jaspal Kooner, Vincent E Mooser, Peter Vollenweider, Karen A Kapur, John Chambers, Nicholas J Wareham, Claudia Langenberg, Rune Frants, Ko Willems-Vandijk, Ben A Oostra, Sara M Willems, Claudia Lamina, Thomas W Winkler, Bruce M Psaty, Russell P Tracy, Jennifer Brody, Ida Chen, Jorma Viikari, Mika Kähönen, Peter P Pramstaller, David M Evans, Beate St Pourcain, Naveed Sattar, Andrew R Wood, Stefania Bandinelli, Olga D Carlson, Josephine M Egan, Stefan Böhringer, Diana van Heemst, Lyudmyla Kedenko, Kati Kristiansson, Marja-Liisa Nuotio, Britt-Marie Loo, Tamara Harris, Melissa Garcia, Alka Kanaya, Margot Haun, Norman Klopp, H-Erich Wichmann, Panos Deloukas, Efi Katsareli, David J Couper, Bruce B Duncan, Margreet Kloppenburg, Linda S Adair, Judith B Borja, , James G Wilson, Solomon Musani, Xiuqing Guo, Toby Johnson, Robert Semple, Tanya M Teslovich, Matthew A Allison, Susan Redline, Sarah G Buxbaum, Karen L Mohlke, Ingrid Meulenbelt, Christie M Ballantyne, George V Dedoussis, Frank B Hu, Yongmei Liu, Bernhard Paulweber, Timothy D Spector, P Eline Slagboom, Luigi Ferrucci, Antti Jula, Markus Perola, Olli Raitakari, Jose C Florez, Veikko Salomaa, Johan G Eriksson, Timothy M Frayling, Andrew A Hicks, Terho Lehtimäki, George Davey Smith, David S Siscovick, Florian Kronenberg, Cornelia van Duijn, Ruth J F Loos, Dawn M Waterworth, James B Meigs, Josée Dupuis, J Brent Richards, Benjamin F Voight, Laura J Scott, Valgerdur Steinthorsdottir, Christian Dina, Ryan P Welch, Eleftheria Zeggini, Cornelia Huth, Yurii S Aulchenko, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Laura J McCulloch, Teresa Ferreira, Harald Grallert, Najaf Amin, Guanming Wu, Cristen J Willer, Soumya Raychaudhuri, Steve A McCarroll, Oliver M Hofmann, Ayellet V Segrè, Mandy van Hoek, Pau Navarro, Kristin Ardlie, Beverley Balkau, Rafn Benediktsson, Amanda J Bennett, Roza Blagieva, Eric Boerwinkle, Lori L Bonnycastle, Kristina Bengtsson Boström, Bert Bravenboer, Suzannah Bumpstead, Noel P Burtt, Guillaume Charpentier, Peter S Chines, Marilyn Cornelis, Gabe Crawford, Alex S F Doney, Katherine S Elliott, Amanda L Elliott, Michael R Erdos, Caroline S Fox, Christopher S Franklin, Martha Ganser, Christian Gieger, Niels Grarup, Todd Green, Simon Griffin, Christopher J Groves, Candace Guiducci, Samy Hadjadj, Neelam Hassanali, Christian Herder, Bo Isomaa, Anne U Jackson, Paul R V Johnson, Torben Jørgensen, Wen H L Kao, Augustine Kong, Peter Kraft, Johanna Kuusisto, Torsten Lauritzen, Man Li, Aloysius Lieverse, Cecilia M Lindgren, Valeriya Lyssenko, Michel Marre, Thomas Meitinger, Kristian Midthjell, Mario A Morken, Narisu Narisu, Peter Nilsson, Katharine R Owen, Felicity Payne, Ann-Kristin Petersen, Carl Platou, Christine Proença, Inga Prokopenko, Wolfgang Rathmann, N William Rayner, Neil R Robertson, Ghislain Rocheleau, Michael Roden, Michael J Sampson, Richa Saxena, Beverley M Shields, Peter Shrader, Gunnar Sigurdsson, Thomas Sparsø, Klaus Straßburger, Heather M Stringham, Qi Sun, Amy J Swift, Barbara Thorand, Jean Tichet, Tiinamaija Tuomi, Rob M Van Dam, Timon W van Haeften, Thijs van Herpt, Jana V van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, G Bragi Walters, Michael N Weedon, Cisca Wijmenga, Jacqueline Witteman, Richard N Bergman, Stéphane Cauchi, Francis S Collins, Anna L Gloyn, Ulf Gyllensten, Torben Hansen, Winston A Hide, Graham A Hitman, Albert Hofman, David J Hunter, Kristian Hveem, Markku Laakso, Andrew D Morris, Colin N A Palmer, Igor Rudan, Eric Sijbrands, Lincoln D Stein, Jaakko Tuomilehto, André Uitterlinden, Mark Walker, Richard M Watanabe, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Bernhard O Boehm, Harry Campbell, Mark J Daly, Andrew T Hattersley, Oluf Pedersen, Inês Barroso, Leif Groop, Rob Sladek, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, James F Wilson, Thomas Illig, Philippe Froguel, Cornelia M van Duijn, Kari Stefansson, David Altshuler, Michael Boehnke, Mark I McCarthy, Nicole Soranzo, Eleanor Wheeler, Nicole L Glazer, Nabila Bouatia-Naji, Reedik Mägi, Joshua Randall, Paul Elliott, Denis Rybin, Abbas Dehghan, Jouke Jan Hottenga, Kijoung Song, Anuj Goel, Taina Lajunen, Alex Doney, Christine Cavalcanti-Proença, Meena Kumari, Nicholas J Timpson, Carina Zabena, Erik Ingelsson, Ping An, Jeffrey O'Connell, Jian'an Luan, Amanda Elliott, Steven A McCarroll, Rosa Maria Roccasecca, François Pattou, Praveen Sethupathy, Yavuz Ariyurek, Philip Barter, John P Beilby, Yoav Ben-Shlomo, Sven Bergmann, Murielle Bochud, Amélie Bonnefond, Knut Borch-Johnsen, Yvonne Böttcher, Eric Brunner, Suzannah J Bumpstead, Yii-Der Ida Chen, Peter Chines, Robert Clarke, Lachlan J M Coin, Matthew N Cooper, Laura Crisponi, Ian N M Day, Eco J C de Geus, Jérôme Delplanque, Annette C Fedson, Antje Fischer-Rosinský, Nita G Forouhi, Maria Grazia Franzosi, Pilar Galán, Mark O Goodarzi, Jurgen Graessler, Scott Grundy, Rhian Gwilliam, Göran Hallmans, Naomi Hammond, Xijing Han, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Caroline Hayward, Simon C Heath, Serge Hercberg, David R Hillman, Aroon D Hingorani, Jennie Hui, Joe Hung, Marika Kaakinen, Jaakko Kaprio, Y Antero Kesäniemi, Mika Kivimäki, Beatrice Knight, Seppo Koskinen, Peter Kovacs, Kirsten Ohm Kyvik, G Mark Lathrop, Debbie A Lawlor, Olivier Le Bacquer, Cécile Lecoeur, Yun Li, Robert Mahley, Massimo Mangino, María Teresa Martínez-Larrad, Jarred B McAteer, Ruth McPherson, Christa Meisinger, David Melzer, David Meyre, Braxton D Mitchell, Sutapa Mukherjee, Silvia Naitza, Matthew J Neville, Marco Orrù, Ruth Pakyz, Giuseppe Paolisso, Cristian Pattaro, Daniel Pearson, John F Peden, Nancy L Pedersen, Andreas F H Pfeiffer, Irene Pichler, Ozren Polašek, Danielle Posthuma, Simon C Potter, Anneli Pouta, Michael A Province, Nigel W Rayner, Kenneth Rice, Samuli Ripatti, Fernando Rivadeneira, Olov Rolandsson, Annelli Sandbaek, Manjinder Sandhu, Serena Sanna, Avan Aihie Sayer, Paul Scheet, Udo Seedorf, Stephen J Sharp, Beverley Shields, Gunnar Sigurðsson, Eric J G Sijbrands, Angela Silveira, Laila Simpson, Andrew Singleton, Nicholas L Smith, Ulla Sovio, Amy Swift, Holly Syddall, Ann-Christine Syvänen, Anke Tönjes, André G Uitterlinden, Ko Willems van Dijk, Dhiraj Varma, Sophie Visvikis-Siest, Veronique Vitart, Nicole Vogelzangs, Gérard Waeber, Peter J Wagner, Andrew Walley, Kim L Ward, Hugh Watkins, Sarah H Wild, Gonneke Willemsen, Jaqueline C M Witteman, John W G Yarnell, Diana Zelenika, Björn Zethelius, Guangju Zhai, Jing Hua Zhao, M Carola Zillikens, Ingrid B Borecki, Pierre Meneton, Patrik K E Magnusson, David M Nathan, Gordon H Williams, Kaisa Silander, Stefan R Bornstein, Peter Schwarz, Joachim Spranger, Fredrik Karpe, Alan R Shuldiner, Cyrus Cooper, Manuel Serrano-Ríos, Lars Lind, Lyle J Palmer, Paul W Franks, Shah Ebrahim, Michael Marmot, W H Linda Kao, Peter Paul Pramstaller, Alan F Wright, Michael Stumvoll, Anders Hamsten, Thomas A Buchanan, Timo T Valle, Jerome I Rotter, Brenda W J H Penninx, Dorret I Boomsma, Antonio Cao, Angelo Scuteri, David Schlessinger, Manuela Uda, Aimo Ruokonen, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Leena Peltonen, Vincent Mooser, Robert Sladek, Kiran Musunuru, Albert V Smith, Andrew C Edmondson, Ioannis M Stylianou, Masahiro Koseki, James P Pirruccello, Daniel I Chasman, Christopher T Johansen, Sigrid W Fouchier, Gina M Peloso, Maja Barbalic, Sally L Ricketts, Joshua C Bis, Mary F Feitosa, Marju Orho-Melander, Olle Melander, Xiaohui Li, Mingyao Li, Yoon Shin Cho, Min Jin Go, Young Jin Kim, Jong-Young Lee, Taesung Park, Kyunga Kim, Xueling Sim, Rick Twee-Hee Ong, Damien C Croteau-Chonka, Leslie A Lange, Joshua D Smith, Andreas Ziegler, Weihua Zhang, Robert Y L Zee, John B Whitfield, John R Thompson, Ida Surakka, Tim D Spector, Johannes H Smit, Juha Sinisalo, James Scott, Juha Saharinen, Chiara Sabatti, Lynda M Rose, Robert Roberts, Mark Rieder, Alex N Parker, Guillaume Paré, Christopher J O'Donnell, Markku S Nieminen, Deborah A Nickerson, Grant W Montgomery, Wendy McArdle, David Masson, Nicholas G Martin, Fabio Marroni, Gavin Lucas, Robert Luben, Marja-Liisa Lokki, Guillaume Lettre, Lenore J Launer, Edward G Lakatta, Reijo Laaksonen, Kirsten O Kyvik, Inke R König, Kay-Tee Khaw, Lee M Kaplan, Asa Johansson, A Cecile J W Janssens, Wilmar Igl, G Kees Hovingh, Christian Hengstenberg, Aki S Havulinna, Nicholas D Hastie, Tamara B Harris, Talin Haritunians, Alistair S Hall, Leif C Groop, Elena González, Nelson B Freimer, Jeanette Erdmann, Kenechi G Ejebe, Angela Döring, Anna F Dominiczak, Serkalem Demissie, Panagiotis Deloukas, Ulf de Faire, Gabriel Crawford, Yii-Der I Chen, Mark J Caulfield, S Matthijs Boekholdt, Themistocles L Assimes, Thomas Quertermous, Mark Seielstad, Tien Y Wong, E-Shyong Tai, Alan B Feranil, Christopher W Kuzawa, Herman A Taylor, Stacey B Gabriel, Hilma Holm, Vilmundur Gudnason, Ronald M Krauss, José M Ordovás, Patricia B Munroe, Jaspal S Kooner, Alan R Tall, Robert A Hegele, John J P Kastelein, Eric E Schadt, David P Strachan, Muredach P Reilly, Nilesh J Samani, Heribert Schunkert, L Adrienne Cupples, Manjinder S Sandhu, Paul M Ridker, Daniel J Rader, Sekar Kathiresan.
PLoS Genet.
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Circulating levels of adiponectin, a hormone produced predominantly by adipocytes, are highly heritable and are inversely associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and other metabolic traits. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in 39,883 individuals of European ancestry to identify genes associated with metabolic disease. We identified 8 novel loci associated with adiponectin levels and confirmed 2 previously reported loci (P?=?4.5×10(-8)-1.2×10(-43)). Using a novel method to combine data across ethnicities (N?=?4,232 African Americans, N?=?1,776 Asians, and N?=?29,347 Europeans), we identified two additional novel loci. Expression analyses of 436 human adipocyte samples revealed that mRNA levels of 18 genes at candidate regions were associated with adiponectin concentrations after accounting for multiple testing (p<3×10(-4)). We next developed a multi-SNP genotypic risk score to test the association of adiponectin decreasing risk alleles on metabolic traits and diseases using consortia-level meta-analytic data. This risk score was associated with increased risk of T2D (p?=?4.3×10(-3), n?=?22,044), increased triglycerides (p?=?2.6×10(-14), n?=?93,440), increased waist-to-hip ratio (p?=?1.8×10(-5), n?=?77,167), increased glucose two hours post oral glucose tolerance testing (p?=?4.4×10(-3), n?=?15,234), increased fasting insulin (p?=?0.015, n?=?48,238), but with lower in HDL-cholesterol concentrations (p?=?4.5×10(-13), n?=?96,748) and decreased BMI (p?=?1.4×10(-4), n?=?121,335). These findings identify novel genetic determinants of adiponectin levels, which, taken together, influence risk of T2D and markers of insulin resistance.
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Genetic profiling using genome-wide significant coronary artery disease risk variants does not improve the prediction of subclinical atherosclerosis: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study, the Bogalusa Heart Study and the Health 2000 Survey--a meta
PLoS ONE
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Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified a large number of variants (SNPs) associating with an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). Recently, the CARDIoGRAM consortium published a GWAS based on the largest study population so far. They successfully replicated twelve already known associations and discovered thirteen new SNPs associating with CAD. We examined whether the genetic profiling of these variants improves prediction of subclinical atherosclerosis--i.e., carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and carotid artery elasticity (CAE)--beyond classical risk factors.
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