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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Genome-wide analysis of drought induced gene expression changes in flax (Linum usitatissimum).
GM Crops Food
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2014
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A robust phenotypic plasticity to ward off adverse environmental conditions determines performance and productivity in crop plants. Flax (linseed), is an important cash crop produced for natural textile fiber (linen) or oilseed with many health promoting products. This crop is prone to drought stress and yield losses in many parts of the world. Despite recent advances in drought research in a number of important crops, related progress in flax is very limited. Since, response of this plant to drought stress has not been addressed at the molecular level; we conducted microarray analysis to capture transcriptome associated with induced drought in flax. This study identified 183 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with diverse cellular, biophysical and metabolic programs in flax. The analysis also revealed especially the altered regulation of cellular and metabolic pathways governing photosynthesis. Additionally, comparative transcriptome analysis identified a plethora of genes that displayed differential regulation both spatially and temporally. These results revealed co-regulated expression of 26 genes in both shoot and root tissues with implications for drought stress response. Furthermore, the data also showed that more genes are upregulated in roots compared to shoots, suggesting that roots may play important and additional roles in response to drought in flax. With prolonged drought treatment, the number of DEGs increased in both tissue types. Differential expression of selected genes was confirmed by qRT-PCR, thus supporting the suggested functional association of these intrinsic genes in maintaining growth and homeostasis in response to imminent drought stress in flax. Together the present study has developed foundational and new transcriptome data sets for drought stress in flax.
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Isolation and screening of phlD (+) plant growth promoting rhizobacteria antagonistic to Ralstonia solanacearum.
World J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.
PUBLISHED: 08-08-2011
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Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) is important widely grown vegetable in India and its productivity is affected by bacterial wilt disease infection caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. To prevent this disease infection a study was conducted to isolate and screen effective plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) antagonistic to R. solanacearum. A total 297 antagonistic bacteria were isolated through dual culture inoculation technique, out of which forty-two antagonistic bacteria were found positive for phlD gene by PCR amplification using two primer sets Phl2a:Phl2b and B2BF:BPR4. The genetic diversity of phlD (+) bacteria was studied by amplified 16S rDNA restriction analysis and demonstrated eleven groups at 65% similarity level. Out of these 42 phlD (+) antagonistic isolates, twenty exhibited significantly fair plant growth promoting activities like phosphate solubilization (0.92-5.33%), 25 produced indole acetic acid (1.63-7.78 ?g ml(-1)) and few strains show production of antifungal metabolites (HCN and siderophore). The screening of PGPR (phlD (+)) for suppression of bacterial wilt disease in glass house conditions was showed ten isolated phlD (+) bacteria were able to suppress infection of bacterial wilt disease in tomato plant (var. Arka vikas) in the presence R. solanacearum. The PGPR (phlD (+)) isolates s188, s215 and s288 was observed to be effective plant growth promoter as it shows highest dry weight per plant (3.86, 3.85 and 3.69 g plant(-1) respectively). The complete absence of wilt disease symptoms in tomato crop plants was observed by these treatments compared to negative control. Therefore inoculation of tomato plant with phlD (+) isolate s188 and other similar biocontrol agents may prove to be a positive strategy for checking wilt disease and thus improving plant vigor.
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Evolution of an expanded sex-determining locus in Volvox.
Science
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2010
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Although dimorphic sexes have evolved repeatedly in multicellular eukaryotes, their origins are unknown. The mating locus (MT) of the sexually dimorphic multicellular green alga Volvox carteri specifies the production of eggs and sperm and has undergone a remarkable expansion and divergence relative to MT from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which is a closely related unicellular species that has equal-sized gametes. Transcriptome analysis revealed a rewired gametic expression program for Volvox MT genes relative to Chlamydomonas and identified multiple gender-specific and sex-regulated transcripts. The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor homolog MAT3 is a Volvox MT gene that displays sexually regulated alternative splicing and evidence of gender-specific selection, both of which are indicative of cooption into the sexual cycle. Thus, sex-determining loci affect the evolution of both sex-related and non-sex-related genes.
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Phenotypic and molecular characterization of indigenous rhizobia nodulating chickpea in India.
Indian J. Exp. Biol.
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In a combined approach of phenotypic and genotypic characterization, 28 indigenous rhizobial isolates obtained from different chickpea growing regions in peninsular and northern India were analyzed for diversity. The field isolates were compared to two reference strains TAL620 and UPM-Ca142 representing M. ciceri and M. mediterraneum respectively. Phenotypic markers such as resistance to antibiotics, tolerance to salinity, temperature, pH, phosphate solubilization ability, growth rate and also symbiotic efficiency showed considerable diversity among rhizobial isolates. Their phenotypic patterns showed adaptations of rhizobial isolates to abiotic stresses such as heat and salinity. Two salt tolerant strains (1.5% NaCl by T1 and T4) with relatively high symbiotic efficiency and two P-solubilising strains (66.7 and 71 microg/ml by T2 and T5) were identified as potential bioinoculants. Molecular profiling by 16S ribosomal DNA Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) revealed three clusters at 67% similarity level. Further, the isolates were differentiated at intraspecific level by 16S rRNA gene phylogeny. Results assigned all the chickpea rhizobial field isolates to belong to three different species of Mesorhizobium genus. 46% of the isolates grouped with Mesorhizobium loti and the rest were identified as M. ciceri and M. mediterraneum, the two species which have been formerly described as specific chickpea symbionts. This is the first report on characterization of chickpea nodulating rhizobia covering soils of both northern and peninsular India. The collection of isolates, diverse in terms of species and symbiotic effectiveness holds a vast pool of genetic material which can be effectively used to yield superior inoculant strains.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.