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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
The Profile of Tumor Antigens Which Can be Targeted by Immunotherapy Depends Upon the Tumor's Anatomical Site.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 05-13-2014
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Previously, we showed that vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) engineered to express a cDNA library from human melanoma cells (ASMEL, Altered Self Melanoma Epitope Library) was an effective systemic therapy to treat subcutaneous (s.c.) murine B16 melanomas. Here, we show that intravenous treatment with the same ASMEL VSV-cDNA library was an effective treatment for established intra-cranial (i.c.) melanoma brain tumors. The optimal combination of antigens identified from the ASMEL which treated s.c. B16 tumors (VSV-N-RAS+VSV-CYTC-C+VSV-TYRP-1) was ineffective against i.c. B16 brain tumors. In contrast, combination of VSV-expressed antigens-VSV-HIF-2?+VSV-SOX-10+VSV-C-MYC+VSV-TYRP1-from ASMEL which was highly effective against i.c. B16 brain tumors, had no efficacy against the same tumors growing subcutaneously. Correspondingly, i.c. B16 tumors expressed a HIF-2?(Hi), SOX-10(Hi), c-myc(Hi), TYRP1, N-RAS(lo)Cytc(lo) antigen profile, which differed significantly from the HIF-2?(lo), SOX-10(lo), c-myc(lo), TYRP1, N-RAS(Hi)Cytc(Hi) phenotype of s.c. B16 tumors, and was imposed upon the tumor cells by CD11b(+) cells within the local brain tumor microenvironment. Combining T-cell costimulation with systemic VSV-cDNA treatment, long-term cures of mice with established i.c. tumors were achieved in about 75% of mice. Our data show that the anatomical location of a tumor profoundly affects the profile of antigens that it expresses.
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Cytokine conditioning enhances systemic delivery and therapy of an oncolytic virus.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2014
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Optimum clinical protocols require systemic delivery of oncolytic viruses in the presence of an intact immune system. We show that preconditioning with immune modulators, or loading virus onto carrier cells ex vivo, enhances virus-mediated antitumor activity. Our early trials of systemic reovirus delivery showed that after infusion reovirus could be recovered from blood cells--but not from plasma--suggesting that rapid association with blood cells may protect virus from neutralizing antibody. We therefore postulated that stimulation of potential carrier cells directly in vivo before intravenous viral delivery would enhance delivery of cell-associated virus to tumor. We show that mobilization of the CD11b(+) cell compartment by granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor immediately before intravenous reovirus, eliminated detectable tumor in mice with small B16 melanomas, and achieved highly significant therapy in mice bearing well-established tumors. Unexpectedly, cytokine conditioning therapy was most effective in the presence of preexisting neutralizing antibody. Consistent with this, reovirus bound by neutralizing antibody effectively accessed monocytes/macrophages and was handed off to tumor cells. Thus, preconditioning with cytokine stimulated recipient cells in vivo for enhanced viral delivery to tumors. Moreover, preexisting neutralizing antibody to an oncolytic virus may, therefore, even be exploited for systemic delivery to tumors in the clinic.
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Trick and treat: Ambushing recurrent tumors before they get out of the door.
Oncoimmunology
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Monitoring and treating dormant tumors represents a major clinical challenge. We have recently found that early recurring tumors elicit an innate immune response that can be detected systemically. We also demonstrated that it may be possible to target minimal residual disease before or after immune evasion with carefully timed, rational therapeutic approaches.
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Detecting and targeting tumor relapse by its resistance to innate effectors at early recurrence.
Nat. Med.
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2013
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Tumor recurrence represents a major clinical challenge. Our data show that emergent recurrent tumors acquire a phenotype radically different from that of their originating primary tumors. This phenotype allows them to evade a host-derived innate immune response elicited by the progression from minimal residual disease (MRD) to actively growing recurrence. Screening for this innate response predicted accurately in which mice recurrence would occur. Premature induction of recurrence resensitized MRD to the primary therapy, suggesting a possible paradigm shift for clinical treatment of dormant disease in which the current expectant approach is replaced with active attempts to uncover MRD before evolution of the escape phenotype is complete. By combining screening with second-line treatments targeting innate insensitivity, up to 100% of mice that would have otherwise relapsed were cured. These data may open new avenues for early detection and appropriately timed, highly targeted treatment of tumor recurrence irrespective of tumor type or frontline treatment.
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CARbodies: Human Antibodies Against Cell Surface Tumor Antigens Selected From Repertoires Displayed on T Cell Chimeric Antigen Receptors.
Mol Ther Nucleic Acids
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2013
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A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library was expressed on the surface of human T cells after transduction with lentiviral vectors (LVs). The repertoire was fused to a first-generation T cell receptor ? (TCR?)-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We used this library to isolate antibodies termed CARbodies that recognize antigens expressed on the tumor cell surface in a proof-of-principle system. After three rounds of activation-selection there was a clear repertoire restriction, with the emergence dominant clones. The CARbodies were purified from bacterial cultures as soluble and active proteins. Furthermore, to validate its potential application for adoptive cell therapy, human T cells were transduced with a LV encoding a second-generation costimulatory CAR (CAR(v2)) bearing the selected CARbodies. Transduced human primary T cells expressed significant levels of the CARbodies-based CAR(v2) fusion protein on the cell surface, and importantly could be specifically activated, after stimulation with tumor cells. This approach is a promising tool for the generation of antibodies fully adapted to the display format (CAR) and the selection context (cell synapse), which could extend the scope of current adoptive cell therapy strategies with CAR-redirected T cells.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e93; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.19; published online 21 May 2013.
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Improving the outcome of adoptive cell transfer by targeting tumor escape.
Oncoimmunology
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2013
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Adoptive T-cell transfer is among the most promising immunotherapies against cancer. To continue increasing the potential of this therapy, our studies focus on the inhibition of tumor recurrence. Recently, we have demonstrated several ways in which combination therapies involving multiple T-cell populations and immunostimulatory chemotherapy can enhance long-term survival.
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Functional cloning of recurrence-specific antigens identifies molecular targets to treat tumor relapse.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2013
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Aggressive regrowth of recurrent tumors following treatment-induced dormancy represents a major clinical challenge for treatment of malignant disease. We reported previously that recurrent prostate tumors, which underwent complete macroscopic regression followed by aggressive regrowth, could be cured with a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-expressed cDNA library derived from recurrent tumor cells. By screening the protective, recurrence-derived VSV-cDNA library, here we identify topoisomerase-II? (TOPO-II?) as a recurrence-specific tumor antigen against which tolerance can be broken. Tumor recurrences, in two different types of tumor (prostate and melanoma), which had evaded two different frontline treatments (immunotherapy or chemotherapy), significantly overexpressed TOPO-II? compared with their primary tumor counterparts, which conferred a novel sensitivity to doxorubicin (DOX) chemotherapy upon the recurrent tumors. This was exploited in vivo using combination therapies to cure mice, which would otherwise have relapsed, after suboptimal primary therapy in both models. Our data show that recurrent tumors-across histologies and primary treatments-express distinct antigens compared with the primary tumor which can be identified using the VSV-cDNA library technology. These results suggest that it may be possible to design a few common second-line therapies against a variety of tumor recurrences, in some cases using agents with no obvious activity against the primary tumor.
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Adoptive T cell therapy promotes the emergence of genomically altered tumor escape variants.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2011
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Adoptive T cell therapy has been proven effective against melanoma in mice and humans. However, because most responses are incomplete or transient, cures remain rare. To maximize the efficacy of this therapy, it will be essential to gain a better understanding of the processes which result in tumor relapse. We studied these processes using B16ova murine melanoma and adoptive transfer of OT-I T cells. Transfer of T cells as a single therapy provided a significant survival benefit for mice with established subcutaneous tumors. However, tumors which initially regressed often recurred. By analyzing tumors which emerged in the presence of a potent OT-I response, we identified a novel tumor escape mechanism in which tumor cells evaded T cell pressure by undergoing major genomic changes involving loss of the gene encoding the target tumor antigen. Furthermore, we show that these in vivo processes can be recapitulated in vitro using T cell/tumor cell co-cultures. A single round of in vitro co-culture led to significant loss of the ova gene and a tumor cell population with rapidly induced and diverse karyotypic changes. Although these current studies focus on the model OVA antigen, the finding that T cells can directly promote genomic instability has important implications for the development of adoptive T cell therapies.
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Precise scheduling of chemotherapy primes VEGF-producing tumors for successful systemic oncolytic virotherapy.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 07-26-2011
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We have previously reported that a burst of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling to tumor-associated endothelium induces a proviral state, during which systemically delivered oncolytic reovirus can replicate in endothelium, thereby inducing immune-mediated vascular collapse and significant antitumor therapy. Using chimeric receptors, we show here that induction of the proviral state proceeds through VEGFR2, but not VEGFR1, signaling in endothelial cells. In contrast, innate immune activation by reovirus-exposed endothelial cells was predominantly through VEGFR1. By screening conventional chemotherapies for their ability to induce similar effects in combination with reovirus both in vitro and in vivo, we observed that the proviral state could also be induced in endothelial cells exposed to VEGF during rebound from paclitaxel-mediated inhibition of VEGF signaling. We translated these in vitro findings in vivo by careful scheduling of paclitaxel chemotherapy with systemic virotherapy, neither of which alone had therapeutic effects against B16 tumors. Systemic availability of reovirus during endothelial cell recovery from paclitaxel treatment allowed for endothelial replication of the virus, immune-mediated therapy, and tumor cures. Therefore, careful scheduling of combination viro- and chemotherapies, which preclinical testing suggests are individually ineffective against tumor cells, can lead to rational new clinical protocols for systemic treatments with oncolytic viruses.
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Synergistic effects of oncolytic reovirus and docetaxel chemotherapy in prostate cancer.
BMC Cancer
PUBLISHED: 06-06-2011
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Reovirus type 3 Dearing (T3D) has demonstrated oncolytic activity in vitro, in in vivo murine models and in early clinical trials. However the true potential of oncolytic viruses may only be realized fully in combination with other modalities such as chemotherapy, targeted therapy and radiotherapy. In this study, we examine the oncolytic activity of reovirus T3D and chemotherapeutic agents against human prostate cancer cell lines, with particular focus on the highly metastatic cell line PC3 and the chemotherapeutic agent docetaxel. Docetaxel is the standard of care for metastatic prostate cancer and acts by disrupting the normal process of microtubule assembly and disassembly. Reoviruses have been shown to associate with microtubules and may require this association for efficient viral replication.
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Immune recruitment and therapeutic synergy: keys to optimizing oncolytic viral therapy?
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2011
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Oncolytic viruses consist of a diverse range of DNA and RNA viruses traditionally thought to mediate their effects by exploiting aberrations in tumor pathways, allowing preferential viral replication in, and killing of, tumor cells. Clinical development has progressed to late-phase trials, potentially heralding their introduction into clinical practice. However, despite this promise, the activity of oncolytic viruses has yet to achieve the potential suggested in preclinical models. To address this disparity, we need to recognize the complex interaction among oncolytic viruses, tumor, chemotherapy, and host immune system, and appreciate that direct oncolysis may not be the only factor to play an important role in oncolytic virus-mediated antitumor efficacy. Although key in inactivating viruses, the host immune system can also act as an ally against tumors, interacting with oncolytic viruses under the right conditions to generate useful and long-lasting antitumor immunity. Preclinical data also suggest that oncolytic viruses show synergy with standard therapies, which may offer improved clinical response rates. Here, we explore clinical and preclinical data on clinically relevant oncolytic viruses, highlighting areas of progress, uncertainty, and translational opportunity, with respect to immune recruitment and therapeutic synergy.
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Activating systemic T-cell immunity against self tumor antigens to support oncolytic virotherapy with vesicular stomatitis virus.
Hum. Gene Ther.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2011
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We have shown that the antitumor activity of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) against B16ova tumors in C57BL/6 mice is predominantly due to innate antiviral immune effectors. We have also shown that the innate immune-activating properties of VSV can be harnessed to prime adaptive T-cell responses against a tumor-associated antigen (TAA) if the virus is engineered to express the cDNA of the antigen. Here, we show that the combination of VSV expressing OVA as a model tumor antigen, along with adoptive T-cell therapy targeted against the same antigen, is superior to either treatment alone and induces systemic antitumor activity. In addition, we extend our findings with the OVA model to the therapeutic use of VSV expressing hgp100, a self TAA against which tolerance is well established in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast to VSV-ova, T-cell responses raised by VSV-hgp100 were insufficient to improve therapy against B16ova tumors compared with VSV-GFP alone. However, in combination with adoptive transfer of gp100-specific pmel T cells, intratumoral VSV-hgp100 cured significantly more mice than either virus or T cells alone. Even in an aggressive model of metastatic disease, antitumor therapy was generated at levels similar to those observed in the VSV-ova/OT-I model in which a potently immunogenic, nonself TAA was targeted. Therefore, individual poorly effective virotherapies and T-cell therapies that target self TAA of low immunogenicity, which reflects the situation in patients, can be combined to generate very effective antitumor therapy.
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Internalization of oncolytic reovirus by human dendritic cell carriers protects the virus from neutralization.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-09-2011
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Dendritic cells (DC) may be the most effective way of delivering oncolytic viruses to patients. Reovirus, a naturally occurring oncolytic virus, is currently undergoing early clinical trials; however, intravenous delivery of the virus is hampered by pre-existing antiviral immunity. Systemic delivery via cell carriage is a novel approach currently under investigation and initial studies have indicated its feasibility by using a variety of cell types and viruses. This study addressed the efficacy of human DC to transport virus in the presence of human neutralizing serum.
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Pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production by reovirus treated melanoma cells is PKR/NF-?B mediated and supports innate and adaptive anti-tumour immune priming.
Mol. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2011
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As well as inducing direct oncolysis, reovirus treatment of melanoma is associated with activation of innate and adaptive anti-tumour immune responses.
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Broad antigenic coverage induced by vaccination with virus-based cDNA libraries cures established tumors.
Nat. Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-04-2011
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Effective cancer immunotherapy requires the release of a broad spectrum of tumor antigens in the context of potent immune activation. We show here that a cDNA library of normal tissue, expressed from a highly immunogenic viral platform, cures established tumors of the same histological type from which the cDNA library was derived. Immune escape occurred with suboptimal vaccination, but tumor cells that escaped the immune pressure were readily treated by second-line virus-based immunotherapy. This approach has several major advantages. Use of the cDNA library leads to presentation of a broad repertoire of (undefined) tumor-associated antigens, which reduces emergence of treatment-resistant variants and also permits rational, combined-modality approaches in the clinic. Finally, the viral vectors can be delivered systemically, without the need for tumor targeting, and are amenable to clinical-grade production. Therefore, virus-expressed cDNA libraries represent a novel paradigm for cancer treatment addressing many of the key issues that have undermined the efficacy of immuno- and virotherapy to date.
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Vesicular stomatitis virus-induced immune suppressor cells generate antagonism between intratumoral oncolytic virus and cyclophosphamide.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 10-26-2010
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Despite having potent oncolytic activity, in vitro, direct intratumoral injection of oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) into established AE17ova mesothelioma tumors in C57Bl/6 mice had no therapeutic effect. During studies to combine systemic cyclophosphamide (CPA) with VSV to suppress the innate immune reaction against VSV, we observed that CPA alone had highly significant antitumor effects in this model. However, against our expectations, the combination of CPA and VSV consistently reduced therapeutic efficacy compared to CPA alone, despite the fact that the combination increased intratumoral VSV titers. We show here that CPA-mediated therapy against AE17ova tumors was immune-mediated and dependent upon both CD4 T cells and natural killer (NK) cells. However, intratumoral VSV induced a transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?)-dependent suppressive activity, mediated by CD11b(+)GR-1(+) cells that significantly inhibited both antigen-specific T-cell activation, and CPA-activated, NK-dependent killing of AE17ova tumor cells. Overall, our results show that treatment with oncolytic viruses can induce a variety of immune-mediated consequences in vivo with both positive, or negative, effects on antitumor therapy. These underexplored immune consequences of treatment with oncolytic viruses may have significant, and possibly unexpected, impacts on how virotherapy interacts in combination with other agents which modulate antitumor immune effectors.
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VSV oncolytic virotherapy in the B16 model depends upon intact MyD88 signaling.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 10-19-2010
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We show here, for the first time to our knowledge, that the antitumor therapy of oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in the B16ova model depends upon signaling through myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) in host cells. VSV-mediated therapy of B16ova tumors was abolished in MyD88(-/-) mice despite generation of antigen-specific T cell responses similar to those in immune-competent mice. Mice defective in only toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), TLR7, or interleukin 1 (IL-1) signaling retained VSV-induced therapy, suggesting that multiple, redundant pathways of innate immune activation by the virus contribute to antitumor immune reactivity. Lack of MyD88 signaling was associated with decreased expression of proinflammatory cytokines and neutrophil infiltration in response to intratumoral virus, as well as decreased infiltration of draining lymph nodes (LN) with plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) (CD11b(-)GR1(+)B220(+)) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (CD11b(+)GR1(+)F4/80(+)). MyD88 signaling in response to VSV was also closely associated with a type I interferon (IFN) response. This inhibited virus replication within the tumor but also protected the host from viral dissemination from the tumor. Therefore, the innate immune response to oncolytic viruses can be, simultaneously, protherapeutic, antioncolytic, and systemically protective. These paradoxically conflicting roles need to be carefully considered in future strategies designed to improve the efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy.
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REO-10: a phase I study of intravenous reovirus and docetaxel in patients with advanced cancer.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-06-2010
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REOLYSIN (Oncolytics Biotech) consists of a wild-type oncolytic reovirus, which has selective cytotoxicity for tumor cells while sparing normal cells. In a phase I study as a single agent, repeated infusions of reovirus were safe with evidence of antitumor activity. Preclinical studies indicate potential for synergy between reovirus and chemotherapeutic agents. A multicenter, phase I dose escalation study was designed to assess the safety of combining reovirus with docetaxel chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer.
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The effect of cell cycle synchronization on tumor sensitivity to reovirus oncolysis.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 09-14-2010
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The potential for increased sensitivity of tumor cells to oncolytic reovirus by altering the normal cell cycle using clinically available pharmacological agents was investigated. B16.F10 mouse melanoma cells were partially synchronized with hydroxyurea, thymidine, or by mitotic shake-off. Cell survival was determined using MTS [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)- 2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium)] survival assay and virus yield in tumors by plaque assay. An enhanced sensitivity to reovirus was observed following the removal of either hydroxyurea or thymidine from the culture medium (P < 0.0001). The greatest survival difference compared to normal cycling cells was noted when the majority of cells were in S and G2/M phases, and was associated with increased viral replication. Cells collected by mitotic shake-off were nearly devoid of cells in S phase and were less susceptible to reovirus-induced cell kill than their nonsynchronized counterparts (P < 0.0001). In vivo combination of hydroxyurea followed by intratumoral reovirus resulted in reduced tumor growth and increased survival compared to monotherapy (P = 0.0041) at 15 days. Increased amounts of virus were retrieved from tumors from mice treated with sequential hydroxyurea/reovirus compared to concomitant treatment or reovirus monotherapy. These data justify clinical evaluation of this approach supported by the extensive experience, low cost, simple administration, and availability of hydroxyurea.
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Therapeutic effect of sodium iodide symporter gene therapy combined with external beam radiotherapy and targeted drugs that inhibit DNA repair.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 06-29-2010
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Adenoviral (AdV) transfer of sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene has translational potential, but relatively low levels of transduction and subsequent radioisotope uptake limit the efficacy of the approach. In previous studies, we showed that combining NIS gene delivery with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and DNA damage repair inhibitors increased viral gene expression and radioiodide uptake. Here, we report the therapeutic efficacy of this strategy. An adenovirus expressing NIS from a telomerase promoter (Ad-hTR-NIS) was cytotoxic combined with relatively high-dose (50 microCi) (131)I therapy and enhanced the efficacy of EBRT combined with low-dose (10 and 25 microCi) (131)I therapy in colorectal and head and neck cancer cells. Combining this approach with ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) or DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) inhibition caused maintenance of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) at 24 hours and increased cytotoxicity on clonogenic assay. When the triplet of NIS-mediated (131)I therapy, EBRT, and DNA-PKi was used in vivo, 90% of mice were tumor-free at 5 weeks. Acute radiation toxicity in the EBRT field was not exacerbated. In contrast, DNA-PKi did not enhance the therapeutic efficacy of EBRT plus adenovirus-mediated HSVtk/ganciclovir (GCV). Therefore, combining NIS gene therapy and EBRT represents an ideal strategy to exploit the therapeutic benefits of novel radiosensitizers.
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Type III IFN interleukin-28 mediates the antitumor efficacy of oncolytic virus VSV in immune-competent mouse models of cancer.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-18-2010
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Innate immune effector mechanisms triggered by oncolytic viruses may contribute to the clearance of both infected and uninfected tumor cells in immunocompetent murine hosts. Here, we developed an in vitro tumor cell/bone marrow coculture assay and used it to dissect innate immune sensor and effector responses to intratumoral vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). We found that the type III IFN interleukin-28 (IL-28) was induced by viral activation of innate immune-sensing cells, acting as a key mediator of VSV-mediated virotherapy of B16ova melanomas. Using tumor variants which differentially express the IL-28 receptor, we showed that IL-28 induced by VSV within the tumor microenvironment sensitizes tumor cells to natural killer cell recognition and activation. These results revealed new insights into the immunovirological mechanisms associated with oncolytic virotherapy in immune-competent hosts. Moreover, they defined a new class of tumor-associated mutation, such as acquired loss of responsiveness to IL-28 signaling, which confers insensitivity to oncolytic virotherapy through a mechanism independent of viral replication in vitro. Lastly, the findings suggested new strategies to manipulate immune signals that may enhance viral replication, along with antitumor immune activation, and improve the efficacy of oncolytic virotherapies.
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Two-stage phase I dose-escalation study of intratumoral reovirus type 3 dearing and palliative radiotherapy in patients with advanced cancers.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-18-2010
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To determine the safety and feasibility of combining intratumoral reovirus and radiotherapy in patients with advanced cancer and to assess viral biodistribution, reoviral replication in tumors, and antiviral immune responses.
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The biology of the sodium iodide symporter and its potential for targeted gene delivery.
Curr Cancer Drug Targets
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2010
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The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) is responsible for thyroidal, salivary, gastric, intestinal and mammary iodide uptake. It was first cloned from the rat in 1996 and shortly thereafter from human and mouse tissue. In the intervening years, we have learned a great deal about the biology of NIS. Detailed knowledge of its genomic structure, transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation and pharmacological modulation has underpinned the selection of NIS as an exciting approach for targeted gene delivery. A number of in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the potential of using NIS gene therapy as a means of delivering highly conformal radiation doses selectively to tumours. This strategy is particularly attractive because it can be used with both diagnostic (99mTc, 125I, 124I)) and therapeutic (131I, 186Re, 188Re, 211At) radioisotopes and it lends itself to incorporation with standard treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. In this article, we review the biology of NIS and discuss its development for gene therapy.
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Antiangiogenic cancer therapy combined with oncolytic virotherapy leads to regression of established tumors in mice.
J. Clin. Invest.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2010
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Clinical trials of oncolytic virotherapy have shown low toxicity and encouraging signs of efficacy. However, it remains critically important to develop methods for systemic viral delivery if such therapies are to be clinically implemented to treat established tumors. In this respect, much effort is being focused on combining oncolytic viruses with standard treatment modalities such as inhibitors of VEGF165 (an alternatively spliced isoform of VEGF-A) signaling, which are widely used to treat several different cancers. Here, we have demonstrated that combining VEGF165 inhibitors with systemic delivery of oncolytic viruses leads to substantial regression and cure of established tumors in immunocompetent mice. We have shown that manipulating VEGF165-mediated signaling by administering VEGF165 to mice harboring mouse melanoma cells that do not express VEGF165 and by administering a VEGF inhibitor and then withdrawing treatment to allow VEGF levels to rebound in mice harboring mouse melanoma cells expressing VEGF165 allows tumor-associated endothelial cells transiently to support viral replication. This approach led to direct tumor cell lysis and triggered innate immune-mediated attack on the tumor vasculature. It also resulted in long-term antitumor effects, even against tumors in which viral replication is poorly supported. Since this combinatorial approach targets the tumor endothelium, we believe these data have direct, wide-ranging, and immediate clinical applicability across a broad range of tumor types.
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Infiltrative T regulatory cells in enucleated uveal melanomas.
Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2009
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The role of T regulatory (Treg) cells in blunting immune response to cancer appears to be significant, but the presence of Treg cells in uveal melanoma has not been extensively examined. We therefore evaluated the presence of tumor-infiltrating Treg cells in uveal melanomas.
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Expression of IFN-beta enhances both efficacy and safety of oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus for therapy of mesothelioma.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 09-22-2009
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Our preclinical and clinical trials using a replication-defective adenoviral vector expressing IFN-beta have shown promising results for the treatment of malignant mesothelioma. Based on the hypotheses that a replication-competent vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) oncolytic vector would transduce more tumor cells in vivo, that coexpression of the immunostimulatory IFN-beta gene would enhance the immune-based effector mechanisms associated both with regression of mesotheliomas and with VSV-mediated virotherapy, and that virus-derived IFN-beta would add further safety to the VSV platform, we tested the use of IFN-beta as a therapeutic transgene expressed from VSV as a novel treatment for mesothelioma. VSV-IFN-beta showed significant therapy against AB12 murine mesotheliomas in the context of both local and locoregional viral delivery. Biologically active IFN-beta expressed from VSV added significantly to therapy compared with VSV alone, dependent in part on host CD8+ T-cell responses. Immune monitoring suggested that these antitumor T-cell responses may be due to a generalized T-cell activation rather than the priming of tumor antigen-specific T-cell responses. Finally, IFN-beta also added considerable extra safety to the virus by providing protection from off-target viral replication in nontumor tissues and protected severe combined immunodeficient mice from developing lethal neurotoxicity. The enhanced therapeutic index provided by the addition of IFN-beta to VSV therefore provides a powerful justification for the development of this virus for future clinical trials.
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Antitumor immunity can be uncoupled from autoimmunity following heat shock protein 70-mediated inflammatory killing of normal pancreas.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 09-08-2009
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We have a long-term interest in the connectivity between autoimmunity and tumor rejection. However, outside of the melanocyte/melanoma paradigm, little is known about whether autoimmune responses to normal tissue can induce rejection of tumors of the same histologic type. Here, we induced direct, pathogen-like cytotoxicity to the normal pancreas in association with the immune adjuvant heat shock protein 70. In sharp contrast to our studies with a similar approach for the treatment of prostate cancer, inflammatory killing of the normal pancreas induced a Th1-like, anti-self-response to pancreatic antigens, which was rapidly suppressed by a concomitant suppressive regulatory T cell (Treg) response. Interestingly, even when Treg cells were depleted, the Th1-like response was insufficient to induce significant ongoing autoimmunity. However, the Th1-like response to antigens expressed in the pancreas at the time of damage was sufficient to induce rejection of tumors expressing either a foreign (ova) antigen or fully syngeneic tumor antigens (on Panc02 tumor cells), provided that Treg were depleted before inflammatory killing of the normal pancreas. Taken together, these data indicate that profound differences exist between the immunoprotective mechanisms in place between different tissues (pancreas and prostate) in their response to pathogen-like damage. Moreover, they also show that, although multiple layers of immunologic safeguards are in place to prevent the development of severe autoimmune consequences in the pancreas (in contrast to the prostate), tumor rejection responses can still be decoupled from pathologic autoimmune responses in vivo, which may provide novel insights into the immunotherapeutic treatment of pancreatic cancer.
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Reciprocal human dendritic cell-natural killer cell interactions induce antitumor activity following tumor cell infection by oncolytic reovirus.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 09-04-2009
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Oncolytic virotherapy may mediate antitumor effects via direct oncolysis or immune-mediated tumor regression. Although the ability of oncolytic viruses to generate adaptive antitumor immunity has been characterized, their interactions with the innate immune system are relatively unclear. Using a human in vitro system, this study investigates the innate immunological consequences of reovirus therapy and its potential to activate NK cell-mediated antitumor activity. Dendritic cells (DC) loaded with reovirus-infected human melanoma Mel888 cells (DC-MelReo), but not reovirus-infected tumor cells alone, induced IFN-gamma production within the NK cell population upon coculture with PBMC, in a cell-to-cell contact-dependent manner. DC-MelReo secreted the chemokines CCL2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 11, and CXCL10; these culture supernatants induced NK cell chemotaxis. Coculture of DC-MelReo with purified NK cells induced reciprocal contact-dependent phenotypic DC maturation, while DC-MelReo elicited up-regulation of the activation marker CD69 on NK cells, in a partially contact and partially IL-12 dependent manner. Significantly, DC-MelReo induced NK cell cytotoxicity toward tumor cells by a type I IFN dependent mechanism. These data demonstrate that tumor infection by reovirus can act via DC to induce NK cell recruitment, activation, and cytotoxicity, along with reciprocal DC maturation. These findings suggest that reciprocal DC-NK cell interactions, following reovirus therapy, may play an important role in altering the immune milieu of the tumor microenvironment and mediating tumor regression.
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Cell carriers for oncolytic viruses: Fed Ex for cancer therapy.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 08-18-2009
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Oncolytic viruses delivered directly into the circulation face many hazards that impede their localization to, and infection of, metastatic tumors. Such barriers to systemic delivery could be overcome if couriers, which confer both protection, and tumor localization, to their viral cargoes, could be found. Several preclincal studies have shown that viruses can be loaded into, or onto, different types of cells without losing the biological activity of either virus or cell carrier. Importantly, such loading can significantly protect the viruses from immune-mediated virus-neutralizing activities, including antiviral antibody. Moreover, an impressive portfolio of cellular vehicles, which have some degree of tropism for tumor cells themselves, or for the biological properties associated with the tumor stroma, is already available. Therefore, it will soon be possible to initiate clinical protocols to test the hypopthesis that cell-mediated delivery can permit efficient shipping of oncolytic viruses from the loading bay (the production laboratory) directly to the tumor in immune-competent patients with metastatic disease.
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The case of oncolytic viruses versus the immune system: waiting on the judgment of Solomon.
Hum. Gene Ther.
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2009
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The three-way interaction between oncolytic viruses, the tumor microenvironment, and the immune system is critical to the outcome of antitumor therapy. Classically, the immune system is thought to limit the efficacy of therapy, leading to viral clearance. However, preclinical and clinical data suggest that in some cases virotherapy may in fact act as cancer immunotherapy. In this review we discuss the ability of oncolytic viruses to alter the immunogenic milieu of the tumor microenvironment, and the role of innate and adaptive immunity in both restricting and augmenting therapy. Strategies to improve virotherapy by immunomodulation, including suppression or enhancement of the innate and adaptive responses, are discussed.
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Immune-mediated antitumor activity of reovirus is required for therapy and is independent of direct viral oncolysis and replication.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-09-2009
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Reovirus is a naturally occurring oncolytic virus in clinical trials. Although tumor infection by reovirus can generate adaptive antitumor immunity, its therapeutic importance versus direct viral oncolysis is undefined. This study addresses the requirement for viral oncolysis and replication, and the relative importance of antitumor immunity and direct oncolysis in therapy.
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Improved systemic delivery of oncolytic reovirus to established tumors using preconditioning with cyclophosphamide-mediated Treg modulation and interleukin-2.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2009
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The goals of this study were (a) to investigate whether preconditioning of immunocompetent mice with PC-61-mediated regulatory T-cell (Treg) depletion and interleukin-2 (IL-2) would enhance systemic delivery of reovirus into subcutaneous tumors and (b) to test whether cyclophosphamide (CPA), which is clinically approved, could mimic PC-61 for modification of Treg activity for translation into the next generation of clinical trials for intravenous delivery of reovirus.
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Cytotoxic and immune-mediated killing of human colorectal cancer by reovirus-loaded blood and liver mononuclear cells.
Int. J. Cancer
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Reovirus is a promising oncolytic virus, acting by both direct and immune-mediated mechanisms, although its potential may be limited by inactivation after systemic delivery. Our study addressed whether systemically delivered reovirus might be shielded from neutralising antibodies by cell carriage and whether virus-loaded blood or hepatic innate immune effector cells become activated to kill colorectal cancer cells metastatic to the liver in human systems. We found that reovirus was directly cytotoxic against tumour cells but not against fresh hepatocytes. Although direct tumour cell killing by neat virus was significantly reduced in the presence of neutralising serum, reovirus was protected when loaded onto peripheral blood mononuclear cells, which may carry virus after intravenous administration in patients. As well as handing off virus for direct oncolytic killing, natural killer (NK) cells within reovirus-treated blood mononuclear cells were stimulated to kill tumour targets, but not normal hepatocytes, in a Type I interferon-dependent manner. Similarly, NK cells within liver mononuclear cells became selectively cytotoxic towards tumour cells when activated by reovirus. Hence, intravenous reovirus may evade neutralisation by serum via binding to circulating mononuclear cells, and this blood cell carriage has the potential to investigate both direct and innate immune-mediated therapy against human colorectal or other cancers metastatic to the liver.
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The efficacy versus toxicity profile of combination virotherapy and TLR immunotherapy highlights the danger of administering TLR agonists to oncolytic virus-treated mice.
Mol. Ther.
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Injection of oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) into established B16ova melanomas results in tumor regression, in large part by inducing innate immune reactivity against the viral infection, mediated by MyD88- and type III interferon (IFN)-, but not TLR-4-, signaling. We show here that intratumoral (IT) treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a TLR-4 agonist, significantly enhanced the local therapy induced by VSV by combining activation of different innate immune pathways. Therapy was further enhanced by co-recruiting a potent antitumor, adaptive T-cell response by using a VSV engineered to express the ovalbumin tumor-associated antigen ova, in combination with LPS. However, the combination of IT LPS with systemically delivered VSV resulted in rapid morbidity and mortality in the majority of mice. Decreasing the intravenous (IV) dose of VSV to levels at which toxicity was ameliorated did not enhance therapy compared with IT LPS alone. Toxicity of the systemic VSV + IT LPS regimen was associated with rapidly elevated levels of serum tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and interleukin (IL)-6, which neither systemic VSV, nor IT LPS, alone induced. These data show that therapy associated with direct IT injections of oncolytic viruses can be significantly enhanced by combination with agonists of innate immune activation pathways, which are not themselves activated by the virus alone. Importantly, they also highlight possible, unforeseen dangers of combination therapies in which an immunotherapy, even delivered locally at the tumor site, may systemically sensitize the patient to a cytokine shock-like response triggered by IV delivery of oncolytic virus.
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Reovirus exerts potent oncolytic effects in head and neck cancer cell lines that are independent of signalling in the EGFR pathway.
BMC Cancer
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Reovirus exploits aberrant signalling downstream of Ras to mediate tumor-specific oncolysis. Since ~90% squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) over-express EGFR and SCCHN cell lines are sensitive to oncolytic reovirus, we conducted a detailed analysis of the effects of reovirus in 15 head and neck cancer cell lines. Both pre- and post-entry events were studied in an attempt to define biomarkers predictive of sensitivity/resistance to reovirus. In particular, we analysed the role of EGFR/Ras signalling in determining virus-mediated cytotoxicity in SCCHN.
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Phase II trial of intravenous administration of Reolysin(®) (Reovirus Serotype-3-dearing Strain) in patients with metastatic melanoma.
Mol. Ther.
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Reovirus, a replication competent RNA virus, has preclinical activity against melanoma lines and xenografts. We conducted a phase II trial of reovirus in metastatic melanoma patients. Patients received 3 × 10(10) TCID50 on days 1-5 of each 28 day cycle, administered intravenously. Twenty-one eligible patients were enrolled. Treatment was well tolerated without any dose reductions having to be implemented. Post-treatment biopsy samples were obtained in 15 patients, 13/15 contained adequate tumor for correlative analysis. In two patients, productive reoviral replication (viral antigen coexpression with tubulin) was demonstrated, despite increase in neutralizing antibody titers. There were no objective responses although 75-90% tumor necrosis, consistent with treatment effect, was observed in one patient who had metastatic lesions surgically removed. Median time to progression and survival were 45 days (range 13-96 days) and 165 days (range 15 days-15.8 months) respectively. In conclusion, reovirus treatment was well tolerated in metastatic melanoma patients; viral replication was demonstrated in biopsy samples. Based on preclinical data showing synergy with taxane and platinum compounds, a phase II combination trial in metastatic melanoma patients is ongoing.
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Systemic combination virotherapy for melanoma with tumor antigen-expressing vesicular stomatitis virus and adoptive T-cell transfer.
Cancer Res.
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Oncolytic virotherapy offers the potential to treat tumors both as a single agent and in combination with traditional modalities such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Here we describe an effective, fully systemic treatment regimen, which combines virotherapy, acting essentially as an adjuvant immunotherapy, with adoptive cell transfer (ACT). The combination of ACT with systemic administration of a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) engineered to express the endogenous melanocyte antigen glycoprotein 100 (gp100) resulted in regression of established melanomas and generation of antitumor immunity. Tumor response was associated with in vivo T-cell persistence and activation as well as treatment-related vitiligo. However, in a proportion of treated mice, initial tumor regressions were followed by recurrences. Therapy was further enhanced by targeting an additional tumor antigen with the VSV-antigen + ACT combination strategy, leading to sustained response in 100% of mice. Together, our findings suggest that systemic virotherapy combined with antigen-expressing VSV could be used to support and enhance clinical immunotherapy protocols with adoptive T-cell transfer, which are already used in the clinic.
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Adoptive transfer of cytotoxic T lymphocytes targeting two different antigens limits antigen loss and tumor escape.
Hum. Gene Ther.
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An antitumor T-cell response can lead to tumor control without clearing all tumor cells. As long as residual tumor cells remain, there is a constant risk of escape from that T-cell response. We previously showed that adoptive transfer of anti-ova OT-I T cells into B16ova-bearing mice led to tumor regression followed by escape of tumors that had lost the ova gene, rendering the OT-I T cells ineffective. In this study, we hypothesized that simultaneous transfer of cytotoxic T lymphocytes targeted against two independent antigens would reduce selection for single-antigen-loss cells, thereby limiting tumor escape. Using OT-I and Pmel T cells to treat B16ova tumors, we found that early cotransfer could prevent tumor emergence in most mice, whereas neither T-cell specificity alone was able to do so. When combined with total body irradiation for the treatment of larger 7-day tumors, cotransfer was also better at limiting tumor recurrence, and the tumors that did escape combination therapy continued to express both target antigens. As adoptively transferred T cells also persisted in vivo, even in mice with recurrent tumors, we hypothesized that restimulation of these antitumor T cells would prolong survival of mice with recurrent tumors. Consistent with this hypothesis, administration of a low-dose regimen of cyclophosphamide following tumor escape slowed tumor growth in mice that had previously received T-cell therapy, but not in control-treated mice, an effect that was associated with increased activation of T cells in vitro by low- but not high-dose cyclophosphamide.
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Cell carriage, delivery, and selective replication of an oncolytic virus in tumor in patients.
Sci Transl Med
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Oncolytic viruses, which preferentially lyse cancer cells and stimulate an antitumor immune response, represent a promising approach to the treatment of cancer. However, how they evade the antiviral immune response and their selective delivery to, and replication in, tumor over normal tissue has not been investigated in humans. Here, we treated patients with a single cycle of intravenous reovirus before planned surgery to resect colorectal cancer metastases in the liver. Tracking the viral genome in the circulation showed that reovirus could be detected in plasma and blood mononuclear, granulocyte, and platelet cell compartments after infusion. Despite the presence of neutralizing antibodies before viral infusion in all patients, replication-competent reovirus that retained cytotoxicity was recovered from blood cells but not plasma, suggesting that transport by cells could protect virus for potential delivery to tumors. Analysis of surgical specimens demonstrated greater, preferential expression of reovirus protein in malignant cells compared to either tumor stroma or surrounding normal liver tissue. There was evidence of viral factories within tumor, and recovery of replicating virus from tumor (but not normal liver) was achieved in all four patients from whom fresh tissue was available. Hence, reovirus could be protected from neutralizing antibodies after systemic administration by immune cell carriage, which delivered reovirus to tumor. These findings suggest new preclinical and clinical scheduling and treatment combination strategies to enhance in vivo immune evasion and effective intravenous delivery of oncolytic viruses to patients in vivo.
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Reovirus-associated reduction of microRNA-let-7d is related to the increased apoptotic death of cancer cells in clinical samples.
Mod. Pathol.
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We analyzed the in situ molecular correlates of infection from cancer patients treated with reovirus. Melanoma, colorectal, and ovarian cancer samples from such patients showed variable infection of the cancer cells but not the intermingled benign cells. RT in situ PCR showed most cancer cells contained the viral genome with threefold less having productive viral infection as documented by either tubulin or reoviral protein co-expression. Productive infection in the cancer cells was strongly correlated with co-expression of p38 and caspase-3 as well as apoptosis-related death (P<0.001). The cancer cell apoptotic death was due to a marked viral-induced inhibition of microRNA-let-7d that, in turn, upregulated caspase-3 activity. In summary, reovirus shows a striking tropism to cancer cells in clinical samples. A rate-limiting factor of reovirus-induced cancer cell death is productive viral infection that operates via the marked reduction of microRNA-let-7d and concomitant elevated caspase-3 expression.
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Using virally expressed melanoma cDNA libraries to identify tumor-associated antigens that cure melanoma.
Nat. Biotechnol.
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Multiple intravenous injections of a cDNA library, derived from human melanoma cell lines and expressed using the highly immunogenic vector vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), cured mice with established melanoma tumors. Successful tumor eradication was associated with the ability of mouse lymphoid cells to mount a tumor-specific CD4(+) interleukin (IL)-17 recall response in vitro. We used this characteristic IL-17 response to screen the VSV-cDNA library and identified three different VSV-cDNA virus clones that, when used in combination but not alone, achieved the same efficacy against tumors as the complete parental virus library. VSV-expressed cDNA libraries can therefore be used to identify tumor rejection antigens that can cooperate to induce anti-tumor responses. This technology should be applicable to antigen discovery for other cancers, as well as for other diseases in which immune reactivity against more than one target antigen contributes to disease pathology.
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Phase I/II trial of carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy in combination with intravenous oncolytic reovirus in patients with advanced malignancies.
Clin. Cancer Res.
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Reovirus type 3 Dearing (RT3D) replicates preferentially in Ras-activated cancers. RT3D shows synergistic in vitro cytotoxicity in combination with platins and taxanes. The purpose of this phase I/II study was to assess RT3D combined with carboplatin/paclitaxel in patients with advanced cancers.
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