JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Interphase gap as a means to reduce electrical stimulation thresholds for epiretinal prostheses.
J Neural Eng
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Epiretinal prostheses are designed to restore functional vision to the blind by electrically stimulating surviving retinal neurons. These devices have classically employed symmetric biphasic current pulses in order to maintain a balance of charge. Prior electrophysiological and psychophysical studies in peripheral nerve show that adding an interphase gap (IPG) between the two phases makes stimulation more efficient than pulses with no gap. This led us to investigate the effect of IPG duration on retinal stimulation thresholds.
Related JoVE Video
Hemolysis as a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of hemodialysis: a case report.
BMC Res Notes
PUBLISHED: 03-15-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The burden of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States has increased dramatically over the past 30 years with almost 613,000 patients receiving renal replacement therapy in 2011. That same year, more than 112,000 new patients initiated dialysis with 92% of them receiving hemodialysis (HD). These patients experience significant morbidity and mortality with very frequent emergency room visits. Acute hemolysis associated with HD is a rare complication; however, if it's not recognized early and managed adequately, it can be associated with life-threatening complications such as hyperkalemia and even myocardial infarction.
Related JoVE Video
Patients' preferences for selection of endpoints in cardiovascular clinical trials.
J Community Hosp Intern Med Perspect
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To reduce the duration and overall costs of cardiovascular trials, use of the combined endpoints in trial design has become commonplace. Though this methodology may serve the needs of investigators and trial sponsors, the preferences of patients or potential trial subjects in the trial design process has not been studied.
Related JoVE Video
Fluorescently-Labeled Estradiol Internalization and Membrane Trafficking in Live N-38 Neuronal Cells Visualized with Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy.
J Steroids Horm Sci
PUBLISHED: 12-20-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Estradiol is a steroid hormone that binds and activates estradiol receptors. Activation of these receptors is known to modulate neuronal physiology and provide neuroprotection, but it is not completely understood how estradiol mediates these actions on the nervous system. Activation of a sub-population of estradiol receptor-? (ER?), originally identified as a nuclear protein, localizes to the plasma membrane and appears to be a critical step in neuroprotection against brain injury and disease. Previously we showed that estradiol stimulates the rapid and transient trafficking of plasma membrane ER? in primary hypothalamic neurons, and internalization of membrane-impermeant estradiol (E6BSA-FITC) into cortical neuron endosomes in vitro. These findings support the concept that estradiol activates and down-regulates plasma membrane ER? by triggering endocytosis. Here, we use TIRFM (total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy) to image the trafficking of E6BSA-FITC, and GFP-labeled ER?, in live cells in real time. We show that activation of plasma membrane ERs by E6BSA-FITC result in internalization of the fluorescent ligand in live N-38 neurons, an immortalized hypothalamic cell line. Pretreatment with ER antagonist ICI 182,780 decreased the number of E6BSA-FITC labeled puncta observed. We also observed in live N-38 neurons that E6BSA-FITC co-localized with FM4-64 and LysoTracker fluorescent dyes that label endosomes and lysosomes. Our results provide further evidence that plasma membrane ER? activation results in endocytosis of the receptor.
Related JoVE Video
Live imaging and analysis of postnatal mouse retinal development.
BMC Dev. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The explanted, developing rodent retina provides an efficient and accessible preparation for use in gene transfer and pharmacological experimentation. Many of the features of normal development are retained in the explanted retina, including retinal progenitor cell proliferation, heterochronic cell production, interkinetic nuclear migration, and connectivity. To date, live imaging in the developing retina has been reported in non-mammalian and mammalian whole-mount samples. An integrated approach to rodent retinal culture/transfection, live imaging, cell tracking, and analysis in structurally intact explants greatly improves our ability to assess the kinetics of cell production.
Related JoVE Video
Light-triggered modulation of cellular electrical activity by ruthenium diimine nanoswitches.
ACS Chem Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Ruthenium diimine complexes have previously been used to facilitate light-activated electron transfer in the study of redox metalloproteins. Excitation at 488 nm leads to a photoexcited state, in which the complex can either accept or donate an electron, respectively, in the presence of a soluble sacrificial reductant or oxidant. Here, we describe a novel application of these complexes in mediating light-induced changes in cellular electrical activity. We demonstrate that RubpyC17 ([Ru(bpy)(2)(bpy-C17)](2+), where bpy is 2,2-bipyridine and bpy-C17 is 2,2-4-heptadecyl-4-methyl-bipyridine), readily incorporates into the plasma membrane of cells, as evidenced by membrane-confined luminescence. Excitable cells incubated in RubpyC17 and then illuminated at 488 nm in the presence of the reductant ascorbate undergo membrane depolarization leading to firing of action potentials. In contrast, the same experiment performed with the oxidant ferricyanide, instead of ascorbate, leads to hyperpolarization. These experiments suggest that illumination of membrane-associated RubpyC17 in the presence of ascorbate alters the cell membrane potential by increasing the negative charge on the outer face of the cell membrane capacitor, effectively depolarizing the cell membrane. We rule out two alternative explanations for light-induced membrane potential changes, using patch clamp experiments: (1) light-induced direct interaction of RubpyC17 with ion channels and (2) light-induced membrane perforation. We show that incorporation of RubpyC17 into the plasma membrane of neuroendocrine cells enables light-induced secretion as monitored by amperometry. While the present work is focused on ruthenium diimine complexes, the findings point more generally to broader application of other transition metal complexes to mediate light-induced biological changes.
Related JoVE Video
Investigating contactless high frequency ultrasound microbeam stimulation for determination of invasion potential of breast cancer cells.
Biotechnol. Bioeng.
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
In this article, we investigate the application of contactless high frequency ultrasound microbeam stimulation (HFUMS) for determining the invasion potential of breast cancer cells. In breast cancer patients, the finding of tumor metastasis significantly worsens the clinical prognosis. Thus, early determination of the potential of a tumor for invasion and metastasis would significantly impact decisions about aggressiveness of cancer treatment. Recent work suggests that invasive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231), but not weakly invasive breast cancer cells (MCF-7, SKBR3, and BT-474), display a number of neuronal characteristics, including expression of voltage-gated sodium channels. Since sodium channels are often co-expressed with calcium channels, this prompted us to test whether single-cell stimulation by a highly focused ultrasound microbeam would trigger Ca(2+) elevation, especially in highly invasive breast cancer cells. To calibrate the diameter of the microbeam ultrasound produced by a 200-MHz single element LiNbO3 transducer, we focused the beam on a wire target and performed a pulse-echo test. The width of the beam was ?17?µm, appropriate for single cell stimulation. Membrane-permeant fluorescent Ca(2+) indicators were utilized to monitor Ca(2+) changes in the cells due to HFUMS. The cell response index (CRI), which is a composite parameter reflecting both Ca(2+) elevation and the fraction of responding cells elicited by HFUMS, was much greater in highly invasive breast cancer cells than in the weakly invasive breast cancer cells. The CRI of MDA-MB-231 cells depended on peak-to-peak amplitude of the voltage driving the transducer. These results suggest that HFUMS may serve as a novel tool to determine the invasion potential of breast cancer cells, and with further refinement may offer a rapid test for invasiveness of tumor biopsies in situ.
Related JoVE Video
Complexin facilitates exocytosis and synchronizes vesicle release in two secretory model systems.
J. Physiol. (Lond.)
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Complexins (Cplxs) are small, SNARE-associated proteins believed to regulate fast, calcium-triggered exocytosis. However, studies have pointed to either an inhibitory and/or facilitatory role in exocytosis, and the role of Cplxs in synchronizing exocytosis is relatively unexplored. Here, we compare the function of two types of complexin, Cplx 1 and 2, in two model systems of calcium-dependent exocytosis. In mouse neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), we find that lack of Cplx 1 significantly reduces and desynchronizes calcium-triggered synaptic transmission; furthermore, high-frequency stimulation elicits synaptic facilitation, instead of normal synaptic depression, and the degree of facilitation is highly sensitive to the amount of cytoplasmic calcium buffering. In Cplx 2-null adrenal chromaffin cells, we also find decreased and desynchronized evoked release, and identify a significant reduction in the vesicle pool close to the calcium channels (immediately releasable pool, IRP). Viral transduction with either Cplx 1 or 2 rescues both the size of the evoked response and the synchronicity of release, and it restores the IRP size. Our findings in two model systems are mutually compatible and indicate a role of Cplx 1 and 2 in facilitating vesicle priming, and also lead to the new hypothesis that Cplxs may synchronize vesicle release by promoting coupling between secretory vesicles and calcium channels.
Related JoVE Video
Imaging the response of the retina to electrical stimulation with genetically encoded calcium indicators.
J. Neurophysiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Epiretinal implants for the blind are designed to stimulate surviving retinal neurons, thus bypassing the diseased photoreceptor layer. Single-unit or multielectrode recordings from isolated animal retina are commonly used to inform the design of these implants. However, such electrical recordings provide limited information about the spatial patterns of retinal activation. Calcium imaging overcomes this limitation, as imaging enables high spatial resolution mapping of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) activity as well as simultaneous recording from hundreds of RGCs. Prior experiments in amphibian retina have demonstrated proof of principle, yet experiments in mammalian retina have been hindered by the inability to load calcium indicators into mature mammalian RGCs. Here, we report a method for labeling the majority of ganglion cells in adult rat retina with genetically encoded calcium indicators, specifically GCaMP3 and GCaMP5G. Intravitreal injection of an adeno-associated viral vector targets ?85% of ganglion cells with high specificity. Because of the large fluorescence signals provided by the GCaMP sensors, we can now for the first time visualize the response of the retina to electrical stimulation in real-time. Imaging transduced retinas mounted on multielectrode arrays reveals how stimulus pulse shape can dramatically affect the spatial extent of RGC activation, which has clear implications in prosthetic applications. Our method can be easily adapted to work with other fluorescent indicator proteins in both wild-type and transgenic mammals.
Related JoVE Video
Analysis of 120 pediatric patients with nonmalignant disorders transplanted using unrelated plasma-depleted or -reduced cord blood.
Transfusion
PUBLISHED: 11-21-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Unrelated cord blood (CB) is an important stem cell source for unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) of patients with nonmalignant disorders. Processing methods to prepare red blood cell-reduced CB units incur significant nucleated cell loss. In contrast, plasma depletion or reduction (PDR) processing of CB units entails the removal of only a portion of the plasma with minimal nucleated cell loss. However, there are relatively limited data regarding outcomes of CB transplants using units processed by PDR.
Related JoVE Video
Vsx1 regulates terminal differentiation of type 7 ON bipolar cells.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Although retinal bipolar cells represent a morphologically well defined population of retinal interneurons, very little is known about the developmental mechanisms that regulate their processing. Furthermore, the identity of specific bipolar cell types that function in distinct visual circuits remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the homeobox gene Vsx1 is expressed in Type 7 ON bipolar cells. In the absence of Vsx1, Type 7 bipolar cells exhibit proper morphological specification but show defects in terminal gene expression. Vsx1 is required for the repression of bipolar cell-specific markers, including Calcium-binding protein 5 and Chx10. This contrasts its genetic requirement as an activator of gene expression in OFF bipolar cells. To assess possible ON signaling defects in Vsx1-null mice, we recorded specifically from ON-OFF directionally selective ganglion cells (DSGCs), which cofasciculate with Type 7 bipolar cell terminals. Vsx1-null ON-OFF DSGCs received more sustained excitatory synaptic input, possibly due to Type 7 bipolar cell defects. Interestingly, in Vsx1-null mice, the directionally selective circuit is functional but compromised. Together, these findings indicate that Vsx1 regulates terminal gene expression in Type 7 bipolar cells and is necessary for proper ON visual signaling within a directionally selective circuit.
Related JoVE Video
Cell recovery comparison between plasma depletion/reduction- and red cell reduction-processing of umbilical cord blood.
Cytotherapy
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Limited cell dose has hampered the use of cord blood transplantation (CBT) in adults. One method of minimizing nucleated cell loss in cord blood (CB) processing is to deplete or reduce plasma but not red blood cells - plasma depletion/reduction (PDR).
Related JoVE Video
A transgenic mouse line expressing cre recombinase in undifferentiated postmitotic mouse retinal bipolar cell precursors.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-18-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Approaches for manipulating cell type-specific gene expression during development depend on the identification of novel genetic tools. Here, we report the generation of a transgenic mouse line that utilizes Vsx2 upstream sequences to direct Cre recombinase to developing retinal bipolar cells. In contrast to the endogenous Vsx2 expression pattern, transgene expression was not detected in proliferating retinal progenitor cells and was restricted to post-mitotic bipolar cells. Cre immunolabeling was detected in rod bipolar cells and a subset of ON and OFF cone bipolar cells. Expression was first observed at postnatal day 3 and was detectable between 24 hours and 36 hours after the last S-phase of the cell cycle. The appearance of Cre-immunolabeled cells preceded the expression of bipolar cell type-specific markers such as PKC? and Cabp5 suggesting that transgene expression is initiated prior to terminal differentiation. In the presence of a constitutive conditional reporter transgene, reporter fluorescence was detected in Cre-expressing bipolar cells in the mature retina as expected, but was also observed in Cre-negative Type 2 bipolar cells and occasionally in Cre-negative photoreceptor cells. Together these findings reveal a new transgenic tool for directing gene expression to post-mitotic retinal precursors that are mostly committed to a bipolar cell fate.
Related JoVE Video
Inappropriate use of D-dimer assay and pulmonary CT angiography in the evaluation of suspected acute pulmonary embolism.
Am J Med Qual
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The authors question whether the d-dimer assay and pulmonary computed tomography angiography (CTA) are being used appropriately to evaluate suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE) at their hospital. To answer this question, a retrospective review was performed on all emergency department (ED) patients who underwent d-dimer assay and/or CTA from August 15, 2008, to August 14, 2009. The authors algorithm for diagnosing PE requires that patients with low or intermediate probability of acute PE undergo a d-dimer assay, followed by CTA if the d-dimer is positive. Patients with high probability of PE should have CTA performed without a d-dimer assay. This result suggests that d-dimer assay and CTA are used inappropriately to evaluate patients with suspected acute PE in our ED. The low threshold for initiating an evaluation for PE decreases the prevalence of PE in this population.
Related JoVE Video
Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor 1 mutation perturbs glucose homeostasis and enhances susceptibility to diet-induced diabetes.
J. Endocrinol.
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) as ligand-gated Ca(2)(+) channels are key modulators of cellular processes. Despite advances in understanding their critical role in regulating neuronal function and cell death, how this family of proteins impact cell metabolism is just emerging. Unexpectedly, a transgenic mouse line (D2D) exhibited progressive glucose intolerance as a result of transgene insertion. Inverse PCR was used to identify the gene disruption in the D2D mice. This led to the discovery that Itpr1 is among the ten loci disrupted in chromosome 6. Itpr1 encodes for IP3R1, the most abundant IP3R isoform in mouse brain and also highly expressed in pancreatic ?-cells. To study IP3R1 function in glucose metabolism, we used the Itpr1 heterozygous mutant mice, opt/+. Glucose homeostasis in male mice cohorts was examined by multiple approaches of metabolic phenotyping. Under regular diet, the opt/+ mice developed glucose intolerance but no insulin resistance. Decrease in second-phase glucose-stimulated blood insulin level was observed in opt/+ mice, accompanied by reduced ?-cell mass and insulin content. Strikingly, when fed with high-fat diet, the opt/+ mice were more susceptible to the development of hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Collectively, our studies identify the gene Itpr1 being interrupted in the D2D mice and uncover a novel role of IP3R1 in regulation of in vivo glucose homeostasis and development of diet-induced diabetes.
Related JoVE Video
Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: suture anchor properties, modes of failure and technical considerations.
Expert Rev Med Devices
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Rotator cuff injury and tears are a common source of shoulder pain, particularly among the elderly. Arthroscopic repair has now become the mainstay in the treatment of significant injuries that have failed conservative therapy. Compared with the traditional open technique, arthroscopic repair offers patients smaller incisions and less soft-tissue trauma, which result in improved postoperative pain and rehabilitation. The advances that have made arthroscopic repairs a reality includes improvement in arthroscopic rotator cuff instrumentation, particularly suture anchors. Suture anchors are used to reattach the torn rotator cuff tissue back onto the bone. Current rotator cuff anchors vary by design, anchor composition and suture materials. A treating physician should be aware of the advantages and limitations of these implants, which may influence the choice of one anchor over another. In addition to anchor variables, other factors that may affect the success of the repair include the local environment and surgical technique. In this article, various aspects of anchor design will be discussed. In addition, a concise review of technical considerations will also be discussed.
Related JoVE Video
Resolution of the epiretinal prosthesis is not limited by electrode size.
IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Epiretinal prostheses for the blind bypass diseased photosensitive cells in the retina, directly stimulating retinal neurons electrically and evoking signals that are relayed to the brain. Current clinical implants have few electrodes and provide limited visual acuity. Acuity may be improved by identifying electrode array design features and operational details that enhance or interfere with visual percept formation. We labeled all retinal ganglion cells in whole mount retina with a calcium reporter and then measured the number and pattern of cells responding, over a range of electrode diameters and stimulus durations. Span of the response scaled with electrode diameter for electrodes 60 ?m and larger. Short stimulation pulse widths selectively activated cells nearest the electrode. Our measurements in the salamander retina suggest that the spatial resolution is 150 ?m, which on a human retina is equivalent to 0.55(°) of human visual field and corresponding Snellen acuity of 20/660. Reading large print could be possible with such a prosthesis.
Related JoVE Video
Guidelines for the development and validation of new potency assays for the evaluation of umbilical cord blood.
Cytotherapy
PUBLISHED: 03-30-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The following commentary was developed by the National Marrow Donor Program Cord Blood Advisory Group and is intended to provide an overview of umbilical cord blood (UCB) processing, summarize the current state of potency assays used to characterize UCB, and define limitations of the assays and future needs of the cord blood banking and transplant community. The UCB banking industry is eager to participate in the development of standardized assays to uniformly characterize cellular therapy products that are manufactured in a variety of ways. This paper describes the desired qualities of these assays and how the industry proposes to co-operate with developers to bring relevant assays to market. To that end, the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) Cord Blood Bank Network is available to serve as a resource for UCB testing material, research and development consulting, and product/assay testing in an accredited UCB manufacturing environment.
Related JoVE Video
Absence of Vsx1 expression in the normal and damaged mouse cornea.
Mol. Vis.
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To examine the expression of visual system homeobox 1 (Vsx1) in the mouse cornea and its potential role in the corneal wound response pathway.
Related JoVE Video
Acute and long-term response of dopamine nigrostriatal synapses to a single, low-dose episode of 3-nitropropionic acid-mediated chemical hypoxia.
Synapse
PUBLISHED: 07-26-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The goal of the present investigation was to determine the persistence of striatal (DA) dopaminergic dysfunction after a mild chemically induced hypoxic event in Fisher 344 rats. To this end, we gave a single injection of the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP; 16.5 mg/kg, i.p.) to 2-month old male F344 rats and measured various indices of striatal DA functioning and lipid peroxidation over a 3-month span. Separate groups of rats were used to measure rod walking, evoked DA release, DA content, malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation, DA receptor binding, and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity. The results showed that 3-NP exposure reduced most measures of DA functioning including motoric ability, DA release, and D(2) receptor densities for 1 to 3 months postdrug administration. Interestingly, DA content was reduced 1 week after 3-NP exposure, but rose to 147% of control values 1 month after 3-NP treatment. MDA accumulation, a measure of lipid peroxidation activity, was increased 24 h and 1 month after 3-NP treatment. 3-NP did not affect TH activity, suggesting that alterations in DA functioning were not the result of nigrostriatal terminal loss. These data demonstrate that a brief mild hypoxic episode caused by 3-NP exposure has long-term detrimental effects on the functioning of the nigrostriatal DA system.
Related JoVE Video
Characteristics and functions of {alpha}-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptors expressed in mouse pancreatic {alpha}-cells.
Endocrinology
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Pancreatic islet cells use neurotransmitters such as l-glutamate to regulate hormone secretion. We determined which cell types in mouse pancreatic islets express ionotropic glutamate receptor channels (iGluRs) and describe the detailed biophysical properties and physiological roles of these receptors. Currents through iGluRs and the resulting membrane depolarization were measured with patch-clamp methods. Ca(2+) influx through voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and Ca(2+)-evoked exocytosis were detected by Ca(2+) imaging and carbon-fiber microamperometry. Whereas iGluR2 glutamate receptor immunoreactivity was detected using specific antibodies in immunocytochemically identified mouse alpha- and beta-cells, functional iGluRs were detected only in the alpha-cells. Fast application of l-glutamate to cells elicited rapidly activating and desensitizing inward currents at -60 mV. By functional criteria, the currents were identified as alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptors. They were activated and desensitized by AMPA, and were activated only weakly by kainate. The desensitization by AMPA was inhibited by cyclothiazide, and the currents were blocked by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). Islet iGluRs showed nonselective cation permeability with a low Ca(2+) permeability (P(Ca)/P(Na) = 0.16). Activation of the AMPA receptors induced a sequence of cellular actions in alpha-cells: 1) depolarization of the membrane by 27 +/- 3 mV, 2) rise in intracellular Ca(2+) mainly mediated by voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels activated during the membrane depolarization, and 3) increase of exocytosis by the Ca(2+) rise. In conclusion, iGluRs expressed in mouse alpha-cells resemble the low Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptor in brain and can stimulate exocytosis.
Related JoVE Video
Kummells disease: delayed post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the vertebral body.
Eur Spine J
PUBLISHED: 10-21-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Delayed post-traumatic osteonecrosis, also known by its eponym Kummells disease, is a rarely reported clinical entity that likely occurs with higher frequency than recognized. We highlight a case of a 75-year-old female household ambulator who presented with significant thoracolumbar pain and delayed T12 collapse after a ground-level fall. The patient had sustained a trivial fall at home 4 months prior to this presentation and had been hospitalized in our institution at that time for a general medical workup. Dedicated spine radiographs were not obtained during this visit. However, lateral chest radiograph demonstrated an intact T12 vertebral body. The patient was able to mobilize successfully with therapy and was discharged home. During the interim between the initial fall and subsequent presentation, she resumed physical activity including ambulating independently and performing various housework. Approximately 4 months following her initial injury, the patient returned to a local emergency department with vague complaints of abdominal pain without any history of recent fall or injury. After an unremarkable workup, the patient was sent home. Ten days later, she represented to our institutions emergency room with worsening pain. Radiographs and CT scan demonstrated interval collapse of the T12 vertebral body. A linear vacuum cleft was noted on X-rays and CT. An extensive workup to exclude other processes such as malignancy or infection, which was negative, ensued. Delayed post-traumatic vertebral collapse was diagnosed. A trial of medical management and therapy was attempted, but she continued to experience significant pain. A T12 vertebroplasty was therefore offered and performed to stabilize the injury and to relieve the pain. She was subsequently able to be discharged from the hospital and transitioned back to home life. At approximately 2 years following her injury, the patient was noted to be able to ambulate with a walking aid. Her final radiograph after her surgery demonstrated that the T12 vertebroplasty had maintained its height and sagittal alignment. This Grand Round case highlights the clinical presentation of Kummells disease. Aspects of the clinical entity that will be discussed include a historical review of the disease, hallmark radiographic findings and treatment options.
Related JoVE Video
Ezrin mediates tethering of the gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter GAT1 to actin filaments via a C-terminal PDZ-interacting domain.
Biophys. J.
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
A high density of neurotransmitter transporters on axons and presynaptic boutons is required for the efficient clearance of neurotransmitters from the synapse. Therefore, regulators of transporter trafficking (insertion, retrieval, and confinement) can play an important role in maintaining the transporter density necessary for effective function. We determined the interactions that confine GAT1 at the membrane by investigating the lateral mobility of GAT1-yellow fluorescent protein-8 (YFP8) expressed in neuroblastoma 2a cells. Through fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we found that a significant fraction ( approximately 50%) of membrane-localized GAT1 is immobile on the time scale investigated ( approximately 150 s). The mobility of the transporter can be increased by depolymerizing actin or by interrupting the GAT1 postsynaptic density 95/Discs large/zona occludens 1 (PDZ)-interacting domain. Microtubule depolymerization, in contrast, does not affect GAT1 membrane mobility. We also identified ezrin as a major GAT1 adaptor to actin. Förster resonance energy transfer suggests that GAT1-YFP8 and cyan fluorescent (CFP) tagged ezrin (ezrin-CFP) exist within a complex that has a Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency of 19% +/- 2%. This interaction can be diminished by disrupting the actin cytoskeleton. In addition, the disruption of actin results in a >3-fold increase in gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake, apparently via a mechanism distinct from the PDZ-interacting protein. Our data reveal that actin confines GAT1 to the plasma membrane via ezrin, and this interaction is mediated through the PDZ-interacting domain of GAT1.
Related JoVE Video
Cytopathology and exocrine dysfunction induced in ex vivo rabbit lacrimal gland acinar cell models by chronic exposure to histamine or serotonin.
Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Lacrimal immunohistopathology has diverse clinical presentations, suggesting that inflammatory mediators exert diverse influences. Chronic exposure to agonistic acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies has been studied previously; the present work addressed mediators that signal through other G protein-coupled receptors.
Related JoVE Video
Mechanisms and functional significance of inhibition of neuronal T-type calcium channels by isoflurane.
Mol. Pharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Previous data have indicated that T-type calcium channels (low-voltage activated T-channels) are potently inhibited by volatile anesthetics. Although the interactions of T-channels with a number of anesthetics have been described, the mechanisms by which these agents modulate channel activity, and the functional consequences of such interactions, are not well studied. Here, we used patch-clamp recordings to explore the actions of a prototypical volatile anesthetic, isoflurane (Iso), on recombinant human Ca(V)3.1 and Ca(V)3.2 isoforms of T-channels. We also performed behavioral testing of anesthetic endpoints in mice lacking Ca(V)3.2. Iso applied at resting channel states blocked current through both isoforms in a similar manner at clinically relevant concentrations (1 minimum alveolar concentration, MAC). Inhibition was more prominent at depolarized membrane potentials (-65 versus -100 mV) as evidenced by hyperpolarizing shifts in channel availability curves and a 2.5-fold decrease in IC(50) values. Iso slowed recovery from inactivation and enhanced deactivation in both Ca(V)3.1 and Ca(V)3.2 in a comparable manner but caused a depolarizing shift in activation curves and greater use-dependent block of Ca(V)3.2 channels. In behavioral tests, Ca(V)3.2 knockout (KO) mice showed significantly decreased MAC in comparison with wild-type (WT) litter mates. KO and WT mice did not differ in loss of righting reflex, but mutant mice displayed a delayed onset of anesthetic induction. We conclude that state-dependent inhibition of T-channel isoforms in the central and peripheral nervous systems may contribute to isofluranes important clinical effects.
Related JoVE Video
Fluorescent cargo proteins in peptidergic endocrine cells: cell type determines secretion kinetics at exocytosis.
Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Fluorescent fusion proteins are an important tool for the study of vesicle trafficking and exocytosis, especially when combined with newer types of microscopy. We previously reported that the design of a vesicle-targeted fluorescent fusion construct strongly influences the kinetics of fluorescence change at exocytosis. In the present study we demonstrate that the cell in which a construct is expressed also affects the kinetics of fluorescence change at exocytosis. We fused enhanced green fluorescent protein to the carboxy terminus of the vesicular cargo protein rodent islet amyloid polypeptide. The two proteins were separated by a "linker" sequence of 18 amino acids. We then compared kinetics of fluorescence change at exocytosis for this fluorescent cargo protein expressed in three different types of peptidergic endocrine cell: pancreatic alpha cell, pancreatic beta cell, and adrenal chromaffin cell. In resting cells of all three types, fluorescent spots of similar size and membrane-proximal density appeared near the plasma membrane as expected if the probe is stored in large dense-core secretory vesicles. Upon stimulation, the fluorescent spots displayed sudden changes in fluorescence intensity that were consistent with exocytosis. In beta and alpha cells the fluorescent spots consistently brightened and persisted, whereas in chromaffin cells the fluorescent spots always dispersed rapidly. Thus, for fluorescent cargo proteins in peptidergic endocrine cells, cell type influences the kinetics of fluorescence change at exocytosis. Together with our previous findings, this observation strongly highlights the fact that the behavior of vesicle-targeted fluorescent cargo may be unrelated to that of native cargo, and it emphasizes the need for caution in interpreting fluorescence kinetics in terms of an exocytosis mechanism.
Related JoVE Video
Selective labeling of retinal ganglion cells with calcium indicators by retrograde loading in vitro.
J. Neurosci. Methods
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Here we present a retrograde loading technique that makes it possible for the first time to rapidly load a calcium indicator in the majority of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in salamander retina, and then to observe physiological activity of these dye-loaded cells. Dextran-conjugated calcium indicator, dissolved in water, was applied to the optic nerve stump. Following dye loading, the isolated retina was mounted on a microelectrode array to demonstrate that electrical activity and calcium activity were preserved, as the retina responded to electrical stimuli.
Related JoVE Video
The expression of NOTCH2, HES1 and SOX9 during mouse retinal development.
Gene Expr. Patterns
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Notch signaling is an important regulator of both developmental and post-developmental processes. In the developing retina, Notch1 is required for the maintenance of retinal progenitor cells and for inhibiting photoreceptor cell fate, while Notch3 is required for inhibiting ganglion cell fate. Here we used immunolabeling coupled with a knock-in reporter approach to obtain a detailed spatiotemporal expression pattern of Notch2 during mouse retinal development. Although previous in situ hybridization studies did not reveal appreciable levels of Notch2 in the developing retina, we detected NOTCH2 protein and reporter expression in early embryonic retinal progenitors that also expressed the Notch downstream gene, HES1. In the postnatal retina, NOTCH2, as well as the Notch downstream genes, HES1 and SOX9, were detected in VSX2/Cyclin D1/SOX2-expressing cells in the postnatal retina, and in the mature retina NOTCH2 was most abundant in Müller glia. Our findings indicate a potential role for Notch2 in the developing and mature retina.
Related JoVE Video
Regulation of retinal interneuron subtype identity by the Iroquois homeobox gene Irx6.
Development
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Interneuronal subtype diversity lies at the heart of the distinct molecular properties and synaptic connections that shape the formation of the neuronal circuits that are necessary for the complex spatial and temporal processing of sensory information. Here, we investigate the role of Irx6, a member of the Iroquois homeodomain transcription factor family, in regulating the development of retinal bipolar interneurons. Using a knock-in reporter approach, we show that, in the mouse retina, Irx6 is expressed in type 2 and 3a OFF bipolar interneurons and is required for the expression of cell type-specific markers in these cells, likely through direct transcriptional regulation. In Irx6 mutant mice, presumptive type 3a bipolar cells exhibit an expansion of their axonal projection domain to the entire OFF region of the inner plexiform layer, and adopt molecular features of both type 2 and 3a bipolar cells, highlighted by the ectopic upregulation of neurokinin 3 receptor (Nk3r) and Vsx1. These findings reveal Irx6 as a key regulator of type 3a bipolar cell identity that prevents these cells from adopting characteristic features of type 2 bipolar cells. Analysis of the Irx6;Vsx1 double null retina suggests that the terminal differentiation of type 2 bipolar cells is dependent on the combined expression of the transcription factors Irx6 and Vsx1, but also points to the existence of Irx6;Vsx1-independent mechanisms in regulating OFF bipolar subtype-specific gene expression. This work provides insight into the generation of neuronal subtypes by revealing a mechanism in which opposing, yet interdependent, transcription factors regulate subtype identity.
Related JoVE Video
Hematopoietic cell transplantation with cord blood for cure of HIV infections.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) using CCR5-?32/?32 stem cells from an adult donor has resulted in the only known cure of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, it is not feasible to repeat this procedure except rarely because of the low incidence of the CCR5-?32 allele, the availability of only a small number of potential donors for most patients, and the need for a very close human leukocyte antigen (HLA) match between adult donors and recipients. In contrast, cord blood (CB) transplantations require significantly less stringent HLA matching. Therefore, our hypothesis is that cure of HIV infections by HCT can be accomplished much more readily using umbilical CB stem cells obtained from a modestly sized inventory of cryopreserved CCR5-?32/?32 CB units. To test this hypothesis, we developed a screening program for CB units and are developing an inventory of CCR5-?32/?32 cryopreserved units available for HCT. Three hundred such units are projected to provide for white pediatric patients a 73.6% probability of finding an adequately HLA matched unit with a cell dose of ?2.5 × 10(7) total nucleated cells (TNCs)/kg and a 27.9% probability for white adults. With a cell dose of ?1 × 10(7) TNCs/kg, the corresponding projected probabilities are 85.6% and 82.1%. The projected probabilities are lower for ethnic minorities. Impetus for using CB HCT was provided by a transplantation of an adult with acute myelogenous leukemia who was not HIV infected. The HCT was performed with a CCR5-?32/?32 CB unit, and posttransplantation in vitro studies indicated that the patients peripheral blood mononuclear cells were resistant to HIV infection.
Related JoVE Video
Late effects in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients with acquired severe aplastic anemia: a report from the late effects working committee of the center for international blood and marrow transplant research.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
With improvements in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) outcomes for severe aplastic anemia (SAA), there is a growing population of SAA survivors after HCT. However, there is a paucity of information regarding late effects that occur after HCT in SAA survivors. This study describes the malignant and nonmalignant late effects in survivors with SAA after HCT. A descriptive analysis was conducted of 1718 patients post-HCT for acquired SAA between 1995 and 2006 reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR). The prevalence and cumulative incidence estimates of late effects are reported for 1-year HCT survivors with SAA. Of the HCT recipients, 1176 (68.5%) and 542 (31.5%) patients underwent a matched sibling donor (MSD) or unrelated donor (URD) HCT, respectively. The median age at the time of HCT was 20 years. The median interval from diagnosis to transplantation was 3 months for MSD HCT and 14 months for URD HCT. The median follow-up was 70 months and 67 months for MSD and URD HCT survivors, respectively. Overall survival at 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years for the entire cohort was 76% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 74-78), 73% (95% CI: 71-75), and 70% (95% CI: 68-72). Among 1-year survivors of MSD HCT, 6% had 1 late effect and 1% had multiple late effects. For 1-year survivors of URD HCT, 13% had 1 late effect and 2% had multiple late effects. Among survivors of MSD HCT, the cumulative incidence estimates of developing late effects were all <3% and did not increase over time. In contrast, for recipients of URD HCT, the cumulative incidence of developing several late effects exceeded 3% by 5 years: gonadal dysfunction 10.5% (95% CI: 7.3-14.3), growth disturbance 7.2% (95% CI: 4.4-10.7), avascular necrosis 6.3% (95% CI: 3.6-9.7), hypothyroidism 5.5% (95% CI: 2.8-9.0), and cataracts 5.1% (95% CI: 2.9-8.0). Our results indicated that all patients undergoing HCT for SAA remain at risk for late effects, must be counseled about, and should be monitored for late effects for the remainder of their lives.
Related JoVE Video
Effect of HLA-matching recipients to donor noninherited maternal antigens on outcomes after mismatched umbilical cord blood transplantation for hematologic malignancy.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Transplantation-related mortality (TRM) is high after HLA-mismatched umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation (UCBT). In utero, exposure to noninherited maternal antigen (NIMA) is recognized by the fetus, which induces T regulator cells to that haplotype. It is plausible that UCBTs in which recipients are matched to donor NIMAs may alleviate some of the excess mortality associated with this treatment. To explore this concept, we used marginal matched-pair Cox regression analysis to compare outcomes in 48 NIMA-matched UCBTs (ie, the NIMA of the donor UCB unit matched to the patient) and in 116 non-NIMA-matched UCBTs. All patients had a hematologic malignancy and received a single UCB unit. Cases and controls were matched on age, disease, disease status, transplantation-conditioning regimen, HLA match, and infused cell dose. TRM was lower after NIMA-matched UCBTs compared with NIMA-mismatched UCBTs (relative risk, 0.48; P = .05; 18% versus 32% at 5 years posttransplantation). Consequently, overall survival was higher after NIMA-matched UCBT. The 5-year probability of overall survival was 55% after NIMA-matched UCBTs versus 38% after NIMA-mismatched UCBTs (P = .04). When faced with the choice of multiple HLA-mismatched UCB units containing adequate cell doses, selecting an NIMA-matched UCB unit may improve survival after mismatched UCBT.
Related JoVE Video
A novel dual-color reporter for identifying insulin-producing beta-cells and classifying heterogeneity of insulinoma cell lines.
PLoS ONE
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Many research studies use immortalized cell lines as surrogates for primary beta- cells. We describe the production and use of a novel "indirect" dual-fluorescent reporter system that leads to mutually exclusive expression of EGFP in insulin-producing (INS(+)) beta-cells or mCherry in non-beta-cells. Our system uses the human insulin promoter to initiate a Cre-mediated shift in reporter color within a single transgene construct and is useful for FACS selection of cells from single cultures for further analysis. Application of our reporter to presumably clonal HIT-T15 insulinoma cells, as well as other presumably clonal lines, indicates that these cultures are in fact heterogeneous with respect to INS(+) phenotype. Our strategy could be easily applied to other cell- or tissue-specific promoters. We anticipate its utility for FACS purification of INS(+) and glucose-responsive beta-like-cells from primary human islet cell isolates or in vitro differentiated pluripotent stem cells.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.