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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Predictors of surgical site infection in women undergoing hysterectomy for benign gynecologic disease: a multicenter analysis using the national surgical quality improvement program data.
J Minim Invasive Gynecol
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2014
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To estimate the rate and predictors of surgical site infection (SSI) after hysterectomy performed for benign indications and to identify any association between SSI and other postoperative complications.
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Acute gastrointestinal toxicity after robotic stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for treatment of metastatic gynecological malignancies.
Future Oncol
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2014
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The aim of this study was to assess acute and subacacute gastrointestinal toxicity after fractionated stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in women having recurrent gynecological cancers in the upper abdomen.
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Cyberknife radiotherapy and anastrozole for the treatment of advanced progressive low-grade papillary serous ovarian carcinoma: A case report.
Gynecol Oncol Case Rep
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2013
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•Low-grade papillary serous ovarian carcinoma has unique epidemiologic and disease-specific characteristics•Cyberknife radiotherapy is a unique treatment that may successfully be used to treat unresectable disease•Anastrozole is an effective treatment for hormone receptor-positive low-grade papillary serous ovarian carcinoma.
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Evaluation of the cost of CA-125 measurement, physical exam, and imaging in the diagnosis of recurrent ovarian cancer.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2013
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Ovarian cancer accounts for 50% of deaths from gynecologic malignancies. We sought to determine the cost of common methods of surveillance of women with ovarian cancer in first clinical remission. The current standard for post treatment surveillance is the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines.
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Management of early stage, high-risk endometrial carcinoma: preoperative and surgical considerations.
Obstet Gynecol Int
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2013
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Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in the developed world. Most cases are diagnosed at an early stage and have low-grade histology, portending an overall excellent prognosis. There exists a subgroup of patients with early, high-risk disease, whose management remains controversial, as current data is clouded by inclusion of early stage tumors with different high-risk features for recurrence, unstandardized protocols for surgical staging, and an evolving staging system by which we are grouping these patients. Here, we present preoperative and intraoperative considerations that should be taken into account when planning surgical management for this population of patients.
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Radiochemotherapy plus 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (3-AP, NSC #663249) in advanced-stage cervical and vaginal cancers.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2013
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Cervical and vaginal cancers have virally-mediated or mutated defects in DNA damage repair responses, making these cancers sensible targets for ribonucleotide reductase inhibition during radiochemotherapy.
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Impaired T-cell responses to sphingosine-1-phosphate in HIV-1 infected lymph nodes.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2013
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The determinants of HIV-1-associated lymphadenopathy are poorly understood. We hypothesized that lymphocytes could be sequestered in the HIV-1+ lymph node (LN) through impairments in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) responsiveness. To test this hypothesis, we developed novel assays for S1P-induced Akt phosphorylation and actin polymerization. In the HIV-1+ LN, naïve CD4 T cells and central memory CD4 and CD8 T cells had impaired Akt phosphorylation in response to S1P, whereas actin polymerization responses to S1P were impaired dramatically in all LN maturation subsets. These defects were improved with antiretroviral therapy. LN T cells expressing CD69 were unable to respond to S1P in either assay, yet impaired S1P responses were also seen in HIV-1+ LN T cells lacking CD69 expression. Microbial elements, HIV-1, and interferon ? - putative drivers of HIV-1 associated immune activation all tended to increase CD69 expression and reduce T-cell responses to S1P in vitro. Impairment in T-cell egress from lymph nodes through decreased S1P responsiveness may contribute to HIV-1-associated LN enlargement and to immune dysregulation in a key organ of immune homeostasis.
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Interferon-? is the primary plasma type-I IFN in HIV-1 infection and correlates with immune activation and disease markers.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2013
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Type-I interferon (IFN-I) has been increasingly implicated in HIV-1 pathogenesis. Various studies have shown elevated IFN-I and an IFN-I-induced gene and protein expression signature in HIV-1 infection, yet the elevated IFN-I species has not been conclusively identified, its source remains obscure and its role in driving HIV-1 pathogenesis is controversial. We assessed IFN-I species in plasma by ELISAs and bioassay, and we investigated potential sources of IFN-I in blood and lymph node tissue by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we measured the effect of therapeutic administration of IFN? in HCV-infected subjects to model the effect of IFN? on chronic immune activation. IFN-I bioactivity was significantly increased in plasma of untreated HIV-1-infected subjects relative to uninfected subjects (p = 0.012), and IFN? was the predominant IFN-I subtype correlating with IFN-I bioactivity (r = 0.658, p<0.001). IFN? was not detectable in plasma of subjects receiving anti-retroviral therapy. Elevated expression of IFN? mRNA was limited to lymph node tissue cells, suggesting that peripheral blood leukocytes are not a major source of IFN? in untreated chronic HIV-1 infection. Plasma IFN-I levels correlated inversely with CD4 T cell count (p = 0.003) and positively with levels of plasma HIV-1 RNA and CD38 expression on CD8 T cells (p = 0.009). In hepatitis C virus-infected subjects, treatment with IFN-I and ribavirin increased expression of CD38 on CD8 T cells (p = 0.003). These studies identify IFN? derived from lymph nodes, rather than blood leukocytes, as a possible source of the IFN-I signature that contributes to immune activation in HIV-1 infection.
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Chemotherapy plus radiation in advanced-stage endometrial cancer.
Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 09-08-2011
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We hypothesize that adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy improve the clinical benefit from treatment of advanced-stage endometrial adenocarcinoma.
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Robotic surgery in gynecologic oncology.
Obstet Gynecol Int
PUBLISHED: 06-28-2011
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Robotic surgery for the management of gynecologic cancers allows for minimally invasive surgical removal of cancer-bearing organs and tissues using sophisticated surgeon-manipulated, robotic surgical instrumentation. Early on, gynecologic oncologists recognized that minimally invasive surgery was associated with less surgical morbidity and that it shortened postoperative recovery. Now, robotic surgery represents an effective alternative to conventional laparotomy. Since its widespread adoption, minimally invasive surgery has become an option not only for the morbidly obese but for women with gynecologic malignancy where conventional laparotomy has been associated with significant morbidity. As such, this paper considers indications for robotic surgery, reflects on outcomes from initial robotic surgical outcomes data, reviews cost efficacy and implications in surgical training, and discusses new roles for robotic surgery in gynecologic cancer management.
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Phase I feasibility study of intraperitoneal cisplatin and intravenous paclitaxel followed by intraperitoneal paclitaxel in untreated ovarian, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal carcinoma: a gynecologic oncology group study.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 06-08-2011
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Intraperitoneal chemotherapy has shown a survival advantage over intravenous chemotherapy for women with newly diagnosed optimally debulked epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal carcinoma. However, significant toxicity has limited its acceptance. In an effort to reduce toxicity, the Gynecologic Oncology Group conducted a Phase I study to evaluate the feasibility of day 1 intravenous (IV) paclitaxel and intraperitoneal (IP) cisplatin followed by day 8 IP paclitaxel on an every 21-day cycle.
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Management of a Type I Hypersensitivity Reaction to IV Etoposide in a Woman with a Yolk Sac Tumor: A Case Report.
Case Rep Obstet Gynecol
PUBLISHED: 06-08-2011
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Type I hypersensitivity reactions to intravenous administration of etoposide are extremely rare. Etoposide is an essential component of several chemotherapy regimens used in gynecologic oncology, and discontinuation of this drug during a course of treatment should only be due to severe patient intolerance. We report the successful use of intravenous etoposide phosphate as a substitute drug in a patient with a yolk sac tumor who manifested a Type I hypersensitivity to intravenous etoposide. The patient ultimately completed all 4 cycles of bleomycin, etoposide, cisplatin (BEP) using etoposide phosphate as a substitute drug.
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Endometrial stromal sarcoma metastasis to the lumbar spine and sphenoid bone.
Rare Tumors
PUBLISHED: 06-06-2011
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Endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS) is typically associated with metastasis to the abdomen, pelvis, and lung. We found three case reports of ESS metastasis to the bone (two to the thoracic spine, and one to the parietal bone). Our objective is to review the literature on ESS spinal and intracranial metastases and, report the first case of ESS metastatic to the lumbar paraspinal region and sphenoid bone. A 53-year-old female with ESS status-post radiation, chemotherapy, and pelvic exenteration surgery presented with right hip weakness, back pain, and radicular leg pain that were explained by chemotherapy-induced neuropathy, radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy, and femoral nerve and obturator nerve injury during pelvic exenteration surgery. During routine positron emission tomography, we found metastasis to the L3 lumbar spinal region. L3 laminectomy and subtotal resection of the mass was performed with tumor residual in the neuroforamina and pedicles. One month later, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed for persistent headaches revealed a large lesion in the sphenoid bone that was biopsied transsphenoidally with the same diagnosis, but no further surgery was performed. She is intolerant of chemotherapy and currently undergoing whole brain radiation. Delay in the diagnosis and management of lumbar paraspinal and sphenoid bone metastasis of ESS likely occurred because of the uniqueness of the location and aggressiveness of ESS metastasis. Health care providers should be aware of potentially aggressive metastasis of ESS to bone, in particular the unusual locations of the lumbar paraspinal region and sphenoid bone.
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A double-blind, randomized trial of pyridoxine versus placebo for the prevention of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin-related hand-foot syndrome in gynecologic oncology patients.
Cancer
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2010
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The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of hand-foot syndrome (HFS) in patients who received pyridoxine versus placebo during pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) chemotherapy for recurrent ovarian, breast, or endometrial cancer.
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Stereotactic body radiosurgery for pelvic relapse of gynecologic malignancies.
Technol. Cancer Res. Treat.
PUBLISHED: 09-17-2009
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Clinical management of pelvic relapses from gynecologic malignancies remains challenging. Bulky pelvic relapses often lead to symptomatic cancer-related complications and poor clinical outcomes. Options may be limited by prior surgical, chemotherapeutic, and radiation treatment. Stereotactic body radiosurgery is a novel treatment modality which allows high radiation dose delivery in a non-coplanar fashion with sub-millimeter precision utilizing a linear accelerator mounted on a robotic arm. This study details our clinical experience with stereotactic body radiosurgery for treatment of patients with pelvic relapses of gynecologic malignancies after prior pelvic radiation.
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Sunitinib malate in the treatment of recurrent or persistent uterine leiomyosarcoma: a Gynecologic Oncology Group phase II study.
Gynecol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 07-13-2009
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New agents are needed for patients with metastatic uterine leiomyosarcoma who progress after treatment with doxorubicin or gemcitabine-docetaxel. Agents targeting tumor vasculature have potential for activity in leiomyosarcoma. We aimed to assess the activity of sunitinib in patients with recurrent uterine leiomyosarcoma who had received one or two prior therapies by determining the frequency of patients who survived progression-free for at least 6 months or who achieved objective tumor response. We also aimed to characterize the toxicity of sunitinib and to estimate time-to-progression.
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Surgical management of malignant bowel obstruction: strategies toward palliation of patients with advanced cancer.
Curr Oncol Rep
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2009
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The management of malignant bowel obstruction is a challenging problem because of the poor definition of malignant bowel obstruction compounded by its myriad clinical presentations. Surgeons are called upon to perform invasive procedures designed to alleviate symptoms or correct the underlying obstruction. Unfortunately, interventions may carry a high rate of morbidity and mortality. Balancing these risks and potential benefits is complicated, and there is a paucity of data to help guide these difficult decisions. The surgeon is further handicapped when he or she is not understanding of the patients disease status, prognosis, or long-term goals. Diligent discussion with the primary team and frank discussions with the patient and his or her family are essential to formulate an appropriate plan. It is also essential that the surgeon have a thorough understanding of the surgical options to relieve or palliate malignant bowel obstruction as well as effective nonsurgical interventions. The best approach may be appropriate surgical intervention coupled with aggressive medical management.
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Phase II Clinical Trial of Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiosurgery for Metastatic Gynecologic Malignancies.
Front Oncol
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Background: Recurrent gynecologic cancers are often difficult to manage without significant morbidity. We conducted a phase II study to assess the safety and the efficacy of ablative robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) in women with metastatic gynecologic cancers. Methods: A total of 50 patients with recurrent gynecologic cancer who had single or multiple (?4) metastases underwent robotic-armed Cyberknife SBRT (24Gy/3 daily doses). Toxicities were graded prospectively by common toxicity criteria for adverse events (version 4.0). SBRT target responses were recorded following RECIST criteria (version 1.0). Rates of clinical benefit for SBRT and non-radiosurgical disease relapse were calculated. Disease-free and overall survivals were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model was used to control for prognostic variables. Findings: SBRT was safely delivered, with 49 (98%) of 50 patients completing three prescribed fractions. The most frequent grade 2 or higher adverse events attributed to SBRT included fatigue (16%), nausea (8%), and diarrhea (4%). One (2%) grade four hyperbilirubinemia occurred. SBRT target response was 96% (48 of 50 patients). A 6-month clinical benefit was recorded in 34 [68% (95% CI, 53.2, 80.1)] patients. No SBRT targeted disease progressed. Non-radiosurgical disease relapse occurred in 31 (62%) patients. Median disease-free survival was 7.8?months (95% CI, 4.0, 11.6). Median overall survival was 20.2?months (95% CI, 10.9, 29.5). Interpretation: SBRT safely controlled metastatic gynecologic cancer targets. Given an observed high rate of non-radiosurgical disease relapse, a phase I trial assessing co-administration of SBRT and cytotoxic chemotherapy is underway. Funding: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center.
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Sweets syndrome: a cutaneous harbinger of ovarian carcinoma.
J Gynecol Oncol
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Sweets syndrome, or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, is a condition characterized by fever, neutrophilia, erythematous skin lesions, and a dermal infiltrate consisting predominantly of mature neutrophils on histology. Sweets syndrome is a reactive phenomenon and should be considered a cutaneous marker of systemic disease, including underlying malignancy. We present a case of a 56-year-old woman who presented with vague abdominal symptoms and a tender, erythematous rash on her extremities. Biopsy of her skin lesions revealed Sweets syndrome. A work-up for malignancy eventually demonstrated a pelvic mass and carcinomatosis, and a diagnosis of advanced-stage papillary serous ovarian carcinoma was subsequently made. In postmenopausal women who present with Sweets syndrome, a comprehensive evaluation for malignancy is indicated. In women with a known diagnosis of cancer, Sweets syndrome may manifest in the detection of persistent or recurrent disease.
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A Novel Technique for Transvaginal Retrieval of Enlarged Pelvic Viscera during Minimally Invasive Surgery.
Minim Invasive Surg
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Introduction. With the widespread adoption of laparoscopic and robotic surgery, more and more women are undergoing minimally invasive surgery for complex gynecological procedures. The rate-limiting step is often the delivery of an intact uterus or an unruptured adnexal mass. To avoid conversion to a minilaparotomy for specimen retrieval, we describe a novel technique using an Anchor Tissue Retrieval System bag in conjunction with a pneumo-occluder to easily retrieve large specimens through a colpotomy incision. Surgical Technique. After completion of the robotic-assisted hysterectomy, the uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries were too large to be retrieved intact despite multiple attempts of delivery through the colpotomy incision. Prior to resorting to a minilaparotomy or morcellation of the specimen, a 15?mm anchor retrieval bag with a pneumo-occluder was placed through the vagina and the intact specimen was easily placed inside the bag under direct visualization and removed through the colpotomy incision intact. Conclusion. We routinely utilize this technique to retrieve hysterectomy specimens that are not readily delivered through the colpotomy incision and find this technique to be safe, highly efficient, and cost effective when there is a need to remove large intact specimens during minimally invasive surgery.
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Toxicity of weekly oral topotecan in relation to dosage for gynecologic malignancies: a phase I study.
Anticancer Drugs
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The aim of this study was to determine the dose of weekly oral topotecan that allows safe administration and to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of this dose in patients with recurrent gynecologic malignancies. The first cohort of patients received oral topotecan 6 mg/week administered orally on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day regimen. A standard 3+3 dose-escalating phase design was used for dose levels II-V (8, 10, 12 and 14 mg/week). Toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Cumulative toxicity was summarized in the 6-12 mg/week combined cohort and 14 mg/week cohort separately. Pharmacokinetic samples were obtained for day 1, cycle 1 only in the expansion cohort (dose level V). Twenty-five patients received a total of 88 cycles of therapy. Hematologic toxicities of grade 3 (6-12 mg dose) were neutropenia (25%) and anemia (8.3%). Gastrointestinal toxicities of grade 3 were diarrhea (16.7%) and obstruction (8.3%, disease-related). Grade 3 or 4 (14 mg/week) hematologic toxicities consisted of neutropenia (38.5%), platelets (15.4%), anemia (15.4%), infection with neutropenia (7.7%), and thrombosis (7.7%). Gastrointestinal toxicities of grade 3 were diarrhea (7.7%), obstruction (7.7%), and vomiting (7.7%). One patient died secondary to neutropenic sepsis. One patient (4%; 95% confidence interval: 2.1, 22.3) showed a partial response and five patients (20%; 95% confidence interval: 7.6, 41.3) had stable disease. An oral topotecan dose of 14 mg/week for 3 consecutive weeks out of 4 is mostly associated with acceptable toxicities and may be considered for use in future single-agent phase II trials.
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Stereotactic radiosurgery for gynecologic cancer.
J Vis Exp
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Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) distinguishes itself by necessitating more rigid patient immobilization, accounting for respiratory motion, intricate treatment planning, on-board imaging, and reduced number of ablative radiation doses to cancer targets usually refractory to chemotherapy and conventional radiation. Steep SBRT radiation dose drop-off permits narrow pencil beam treatment fields to be used for ablative radiation treatment condensed into 1 to 3 treatments. Treating physicians must appreciate that SBRT comes at a bigger danger of normal tissue injury and chance of geographic tumor miss. Both must be tackled by immobilization of cancer targets and by high-precision treatment delivery. Cancer target immobilization has been achieved through use of indexed customized Styrofoam casts, evacuated bean bags, or body-fix molds with patient-independent abdominal compression.(1-3) Intrafraction motion of cancer targets due to breathing now can be reduced by patient-responsive breath hold techniques,(4) patient mouthpiece active breathing coordination,(5) respiration-correlated computed tomography,(6) or image-guided tracking of fiducials implanted within and around a moving tumor.(7-9) The Cyberknife system (Accuray [Sunnyvale, CA]) utilizes a radiation linear accelerator mounted on a industrial robotic arm that accurately follows patient respiratory motion by a camera-tracked set of light-emitting diodes (LED) impregnated on a vest fitted to a patient.(10) Substantial reductions in radiation therapy margins can be achieved by motion tracking, ultimately rendering a smaller planning target volumes that are irradiated with submillimeter accuracy.(11-13) Cancer targets treated by SBRT are irradiated by converging, tightly collimated beams. Resultant radiation dose to cancer target volume histograms have a more pronounced radiation "shoulder" indicating high percentage target coverage and a small high-dose radiation "tail." Thus, increased target conformality comes at the expense of decreased dose uniformity in the SBRT cancer target. This may have implications for both subsequent tumor control in the SBRT target and normal tissue tolerance of organs at-risk. Due to the sharp dose falloff in SBRT, the possibility of occult disease escaping ablative radiation dose occurs when cancer targets are not fully recognized and inadequate SBRT dose margins are applied. Clinical target volume (CTV) expansion by 0.5 cm, resulting in a larger planning target volume (PTV), is associated with increased target control without undue normal tissue injury.(7,8) Further reduction in the probability of geographic miss may be achieved by incorporation of 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET).(8) Use of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in SBRT treatment planning is only the beginning of attempts to discover new imaging target molecular signatures for gynecologic cancers.
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Hematological toxicity after robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery for treatment of metastatic gynecologic malignancies.
Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
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To evaluate hematological toxicity after robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) for treatment of women with metastatic abdominopelvic gynecologic malignancies.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.