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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Long-term prognostic value of white coat hypertension: an insight from diagnostic use of both ambulatory and home blood pressure measurements.
Hypertension
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2013
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The prognostic value of white coat hypertension (WCH) is still debated. In 2051 subjects representative of the general population of Monza, we measured office, ambulatory, and home blood pressure (BP). The risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality was assessed over 16 years in normotensive, sustained hypertensive, and WCH subjects, the last group being defined as usually done in clinical practice (ie, by normality of 1 out-of-office [ambulatory or home] BP with an office BP elevation). Compared with normotensive subjects, the risk of cardiovascular mortality, as adjusted for potential confounders, showed a progressive significant increase in WCH and sustained hypertensive subjects (2.04 and 2.94; P=0.006). In either group, a significant increase in adjusted risk was also seen for all-cause mortality. However, when the WCH group was subdivided into 2 subgroups, that is, subjects in whom both out-of-office BPs were normal (true WCH, 42%) or one BP was normal whereas the other was elevated (partial WCH, 58%), only the latter showed a significantly greater adjusted risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality (2.76 and 1.58; P<0.03). Compared with normotensive subjects, the partial WCH group also exhibited a marked increase in adjusted risk of developing sustained hypertension over a 10-year time period (2.58; P<0.0001), but in this case the risk was also increased in true WCH subjects (2.89; P<0.0001). Thus, WCH includes subjects with a widely different long-term risk of a cardiovascular event. To identify those at higher risk, measurements of both out-of-office BPs are desirable.
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The Pamela study: main findings and perspectives.
Curr. Hypertens. Rep.
PUBLISHED: 04-24-2013
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PAMELA (Pressioni Arteriose Monitorate E Loro Associazioni) is an epidemiological study, originally designed to determine the normality of home and ambulatory blood pressure values. The study was performed on 3,200 subjects, aged 25 to 74 years, randomly selected from the general population of Monza (Milan, Italy). In the study context we performed clinical, home and ambulatory blood pressure measurements, echocardiographic assessment of cardiac structure and function as well as laboratory examinations (glucose and lipids). Personal and family histories were collected. The same procedures were repeated 10 years later. During a 12-year follow-up, the incident cardiovascular events were validated. Cardiovascular and all-cause fatal events were collected for a 16-year follow-up. This article will review the main results of the PAMELA study, with particular emphasis on (1) the prognostic value of the different blood pressure measurements, (2) the relationships between metabolic variables and blood pressure and (3) the clinical relevance and prognostic importance of left ventricular mass values and alterations.
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Impact of body mass index and waist circumference on the long-term risk of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiac organ damage.
Hypertension
PUBLISHED: 10-24-2011
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Obesity is associated with a higher risk of developing diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HT), and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). The present study assessed in the general population the impact of body weight and visceral obesity on the development of alterations in glucose metabolism and cardiac structure, as well as of elevation in blood pressure. In 1412 subjects randomly selected and representative of the general population of Monza, we assessed twice (in 1990/1991 and 2000/2001) body mass index (BMI); waist circumference; office, home, and 24-hour ambulatory (24-hour) blood pressure, fasting glycemia, and left ventricular mass (echocardiography). New-onset high-risk conditions were DM; impaired fasting glucose; office, home, and 24-hour HT; and LVH. The incidence of new-onset DM; impaired fasting glucose; office, home, and 24-hour HT; and LVH increased progressively from the quintile with the lowest to the quintile with the highest BMI values. Adjusting for confounders, the risk of developing new-onset DM; impaired fasting glucose; office, home, and 24-hour HT; and LVH increased significantly for an increase of 1 kg/m(2) of BMI and 1 cm of waist circumference (respectively, 8.4% [P<0.01], 9.5% [P<0.0001], 4.2% [P<0.0001], 3.9% [P<0.001], 2.5% [P<0.05], and 5.1% [P<0.001] for BMI and 3.2% [P<0.001], 3.5% [P<0.0001], 1.8% [P<0.0001], 1.5% [P<0.0001], 1.4% [P<0.001], and 2.6% [P<0.0001]). These data provide evidence that an increase in BMI and waist circumference is associated with a linearly increased adjusted risk of developing conditions with high cardiovascular risk, such as DM, impaired fasting glucose, in- and out-of-office HT, and LVH.
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Evaluation of how gene-job strain interaction affects blood pressure in the PAMELA study.
Psychosom Med
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2011
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To see whether there is interaction between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) belonging to candidate genes for hypertension and job strain and its components (job demand and job control) in an accurately phenotyped Italian cohort (Pressioni Arteriose Monitorate E Loro Associazioni).
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The contribution of major risk factors and job strain to occupational class differences in coronary heart disease incidence: the MONICA Brianza and PAMELA population-based cohorts.
Occup Environ Med
PUBLISHED: 12-30-2010
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We investigated the contribution of major coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors and job strain to occupational class differences in CHD incidence in a pooled-cohort prospective study in northern Italy.
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Gender differences in the association between education and the incidence of cardiovascular events in Northern Italy.
Eur J Public Health
PUBLISHED: 11-10-2010
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The educational differences in the incidence of major cardiovascular events are under-studied in Southern Europe and among women.
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Impact of different definitions of the metabolic syndrome on the prevalence of organ damage, cardiometabolic risk and cardiovascular events.
J. Hypertens.
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2010
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We compared definitions of metabolic syndrome performed by ATPIII [the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III; three criteria of the following: systolic blood pressure >or=130 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure >or=85 mmHg, fasting serum glucose >or=110 mg/dl, high-density lipoprotein plasma cholesterol or=150 mg/dl, waist circumference >or=102 cm (men) or 88 cm (women)], AHA (the American Heart Association; same cut-off of ATPIII except serum glucose >or= 100 mg/dl) and IDF [the International Diabetes Federation; mandatory criteria of visceral obesity with reduced cut-off of 94 cm (men) or 80 cm (women), and at least two criteria with the same cut-off as in AHA] for their impact on metabolic syndrome prevalence, cardiac organ damage, long-term risk of cardiovascular events and death for any cause and risk of developing diabetes mellitus, in-office and out-of-office hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH).
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Simultaneous validation of the SunTech 247 diagnostic station blood pressure measurement device according to the British Hypertension Society protocol, the International Protocol and the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation standards
Blood Press Monit
PUBLISHED: 09-11-2009
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SunTech 247 is an oscillometric blood pressure (BP) monitor manufactured by SunTech Medical Inc., Morrisville, North Carolina, USA. The aims of this study were (i) to determine its accuracy using the 1993 modified British Hypertension Society (BHS) protocol, the 2002 International Protocol (IP) and the 2002/2003 Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) standards, (ii) to compare the performance of BHS protocol and IP.
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Left ventricular hypertrophy increases cardiovascular risk independently of in-office and out-of-office blood pressure values.
J. Hypertens.
PUBLISHED: 08-06-2009
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Previous studies have shown that left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) represents a cardiovascular risk factor independently of clinic blood pressure (BP). The present study was aimed at determining the impact of LVH on the incidence of cardiovascular morbid and fatal events taking into account not only classical risk factors but also home and ambulatory BP values, which have been shown to have an important independent prognostic impact.
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Long-term risk of sustained hypertension in white-coat or masked hypertension.
Hypertension
PUBLISHED: 06-29-2009
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It is debated whether white-coat (WCHT) and masked hypertension (MHT) are at greater risk of developing a sustained hypertensive state (SHT). In 1412 subjects of the Pressioni Arteriose Monitorate e Loro Associazioni Study, we measured office blood pressure (BP), 24-hour ambulatory BP, and home BP. The condition of WCHT was identified as office BP >140/90 mm Hg and 24-hour BP mean <125/79 mm Hg or home BP <132/82 mm Hg. Corresponding values for MHT diagnosis were office BP <140/90 mm Hg, 24-hour BP > or =125/79 mm Hg, and home BP >or =132/82 mm Hg. SHT was identified when both office and 24-hour BP means or home BP were over threshold values and normotension was under the threshold value. Subjects were reassessed 10 years later to evaluate the BP status of the various conditions defined previously. At the first examination, 758 (54.1%), 225 (16.1%), 124 (8.9%), and 293 (20.9%) subjects were normotensive, WCHT, MHT, and SHT subjects, respectively. At the second examination, 136 normotensives (18.2%), 95 WCHT (42.6%), and 56 MHT (47.1%) subjects became SHT. As compared with normotensives, adjusting for age and sex, the risk of becoming SHT was significantly higher for WCHT and MHT subjects (odds ratio: 2.51 and 1.78, respectively; P<0.0001). Similar results were obtained when the definition of the various conditions was based on home BP. Independent contributors of worsening of hypertension status were not only baseline BP, but also, although to a lesser extent, metabolic variables and age. Subjects with WCHT and MHT are at increased risk of developing SHT. This may contribute to their prognosis that appears to be worse as compared with that of normotensive subjects.
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Increased long-term risk of new-onset diabetes mellitus in white-coat and masked hypertension.
J. Hypertens.
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2009
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A sustained blood pressure elevation is associated with an increased risk of new-onset diabetes mellitus. Whether this is the case also in white-coat and masked hypertension is unknown.
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Normal values of left-ventricular mass: echocardiographic findings from the PAMELA study.
J. Hypertens.
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Upper reference values of echocardiographic left-ventricular mass in the European population are based on scanty data mostly derived from northern European population-based samples. Furthermore, data in apparently healthy populations have included individuals with conditions affecting left-ventricular mass such as obesity, diabetes and masked hypertension. Thus, from 1051 individuals with normal office blood pressure (BP) belonging to the PAMELA (Pressioni Arteriose Monitorate E Loro Associazioni) study population, we selected a group of 675 sustained normotensive individuals in order to provide reliable echocardiographic reference values for defining the criteria of left-ventricular hypertrophy (LVH).
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.