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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Multisite longitudinal reliability of tract-based spatial statistics in diffusion tensor imaging of healthy elderly subjects.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2014
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Large-scale longitudinal neuroimaging studies with diffusion imaging techniques are necessary to test and validate models of white matter neurophysiological processes that change in time, both in healthy and diseased brains. The predictive power of such longitudinal models will always be limited by the reproducibility of repeated measures acquired during different sessions. At present, there is limited quantitative knowledge about the across-session reproducibility of standard diffusion metrics in 3T multi-centric studies on subjects in stable conditions, in particular when using tract based spatial statistics and with elderly people. In this study we implemented a multi-site brain diffusion protocol in 10 clinical 3T MRI sites distributed across 4 countries in Europe (Italy, Germany, France and Greece) using vendor provided sequences from Siemens (Allegra, Trio Tim, Verio, Skyra, Biograph mMR), Philips (Achieva) and GE (HDxt) scanners. We acquired DTI data (2 × 2 × 2 mm(3), b = 700 s/mm(2), 5 b0 and 30 diffusion weighted volumes) of a group of healthy stable elderly subjects (5 subjects per site) in two separate sessions at least a week apart. For each subject and session four scalar diffusion metrics were considered: fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), radial diffusivity (RD) and axial (AD) diffusivity. The diffusion metrics from multiple subjects and sessions at each site were aligned to their common white matter skeleton using tract-based spatial statistics. The reproducibility at each MRI site was examined by looking at group averages of absolute changes relative to the mean (%) on various parameters: i) reproducibility of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the b0 images in centrum semiovale, ii) full brain test-retest differences of the diffusion metric maps on the white matter skeleton, iii) reproducibility of the diffusion metrics on atlas-based white matter ROIs on the white matter skeleton. Despite the differences of MRI scanner configurations across sites (vendors, models, RF coils and acquisition sequences) we found good and consistent test-retest reproducibility. White matter b0 SNR reproducibility was on average 7 ± 1% with no significant MRI site effects. Whole brain analysis resulted in no significant test-retest differences at any of the sites with any of the DTI metrics. The atlas-based ROI analysis showed that the mean reproducibility errors largely remained in the 2-4% range for FA and AD and 2-6% for MD and RD, averaged across ROIs. Our results show reproducibility values comparable to those reported in studies using a smaller number of MRI scanners, slightly different DTI protocols and mostly younger populations. We therefore show that the acquisition and analysis protocols used are appropriate for multi-site experimental scenarios.
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Entacapone reduces cortical activation in Parkinson's disease with wearing-off: a f-MRI study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Wearing-off is one of the most frequent problems encountered by levodopa-treated patients. Entacapone, a peripheral inhibitor of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), reduces this motor complication by prolonging the effect of levodopa. We sought to understand the impact of COMT-inhibition on movement execution in PD patients with wearing-off by comparing functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI) activation patterns prior to and during entacapone treatment. Our hypothesis was to determine whether changes in cortical activation are associated to COMT-inhibitor treatment.
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Long-term anorectal function after postoperative chemoradiotherapy in high-risk rectal cancer patients.
Tumori
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2010
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After sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer and postoperative radiochemotherapy, many patients have unsatisfactory anorectal functional results which are not considered by the most common toxicity scales. The aim of the present study was to retrospectively assess the long-term incidence of impaired anorectal function in rectal cancer patients who underwent anterior resection and postoperative radiochemotherapy.
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PET and PET-CT in radiation treatment planning for lung cancer.
Expert Rev Anticancer Ther
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2010
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This review analyzes PET images in radiotherapy treatment planning for lung cancer patients and discusses the most controversial current issues. Computed tomography images are commonly used to assess location and extension of target volumes and organs at risk in radiotherapy treatment planning. Although PET is more sensitive and specific, contouring on PET images is difficult because tumor margins are indistinct, due to heterogeneous (18)fluorodeoxyglucose uptake distribution and limited spatial resolution. The best target delineation criteria have not yet been established. In non-small-cell lung cancer, PET appears to improve sparing of organs at risk and reduce the risk of toxicity; prescribed doses can be increased. Data are scarce on small-cell lung cancer.
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Computed tomography for excision cavity localization and 3D-treatment planning in partial breast irradiation with high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy.
Radiother Oncol
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2009
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When high-dose-rate brachytherapy is used for partial breast irradiation (PBI) precise pre-implant definition of planning target volume (PTV) and implant geometry is required. After implantation, accurate PTV localization, catheter reconstruction and optimization of dose distribution are needed for good PTV coverage and dose conformity. We applied image-guidance using computed tomography (CT) for pre-implant PTV definition and post-implant dosimetry.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.