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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Immunotherapy reduces allergen-mediated CD66b expression and myeloperoxidase levels on human neutrophils from allergic patients.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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CD66b is a member of the carcinoembryonic antigen family, which mediates the adhesion between neutrophils and to endothelial cells. Allergen-specific immunotherapy is widely used to treat allergic diseases, and the molecular mechanisms underlying this therapy are poorly understood. The present work was undertaken to analyze A) the in vitro effect of allergens and immunotherapy on cell-surface CD66b expression of neutrophils from patients with allergic asthma and rhinitis and B) the in vivo effect of immunotherapy on cell-surface CD66b expression of neutrophils from nasal lavage fluid during the spring season. Myeloperoxidase expression and activity was also analyzed in nasal lavage fluid as a general marker of neutrophil activation. Results: CD66b cell-surface expression is upregulated in vitro in response to allergens, and significantly reduced by immunotherapy (p<0.001). Myeloperoxidase activity in nasal lavage fluid was also significantly reduced by immunotherapy, as were the neutrophil cell-surface expression of CD66b and myeloperoxidase (p<0.001). Interestingly, CD66b expression was higher in neutrophils from nasal lavage fluid than those from peripheral blood, and immunotherapy reduced the number of CD66+MPO+ cells in nasal lavage fluid. Thus, immunotherapy positive effects might, at least in part, be mediated by the negative regulation of the CD66b and myeloperoxidase activity in human neutrophils.
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Allergen immunotherapy decreases LPS-induced NF-?B activation in neutrophils from allergic patients.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol
PUBLISHED: 09-05-2013
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Allergen-specific immunotherapy (IT) is widely used to treat allergic diseases. The molecular mechanisms have not been clarified yet completely. The present work was undertaken to analyze the effect of IT in the activation of NF-?B.
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Histamine production by human neutrophils.
FASEB J.
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2013
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Histamine is an important mediator in the development of allergic reactions. Only a small subset of human cell types is able to produce histamine. No previous studies have shown that human neutrophils are among them. The present work was undertaken to analyze whether human neutrophils produce histamine, and to determine what agonists are involved in histamine production by human neutrophils. The expression of histidine decarboxylase in human neutrophils was established by quantitative PCR, Western blotting, and flow cytometry analysis. The activity of the enzyme was determined by ELISA, which measured histamine in the culture supernatant of neutrophils stimulated with a set of classical agonists. Human neutrophils are bona fide histamine-producing cells. Neutrophils store ?0.29 pg/cell and release ?50% of the histamine content in an antigen-dependent manner and on stimulation with other neutrophil agonists. Basal expression of histidine decarboxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in histamine production, is higher in neutrophils from patients with allergies than from healthy donors. Our results cannot be ascribed to cell contamination for several reasons. LPS failed to induce histamine release by basophils, whereas it induced histamine release by neutrophils; and we did not detect basophils, monocytes, or lymphocytes in our neutrophil preparations. Eosinophils, albeit detected, were only 0.001-0.004% of the final cell population, and they did not store or release histamine on antigen or LPS stimulation. Antigens to which patients with allergies were sensitized stimulated release of histamine from neutrophils. These observations represent a novel view of neutrophils as possible source of histamine in the allergic diseases.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.