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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Cost sensitive hierarchical document classification to triage PubMed abstracts for manual curation.
BMC Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2011
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The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) project manually curates information from published journal articles that describe immune epitopes derived from a wide variety of organisms and associated with different diseases. In the past, abstracts of scientific articles were retrieved by broad keyword queries of PubMed, and were classified as relevant (curatable) or irrelevant (not curatable) to the scope of the database by a Naïve Bayes classifier. The curatable abstracts were subsequently manually classified into categories corresponding to different disease domains. Over the past four years, we have examined how to further improve this approach in order to enhance classification performance and to reduce the need for manual intervention.
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The immune epitope database 2.0.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 11-11-2009
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The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB, www.iedb.org) provides a catalog of experimentally characterized B and T cell epitopes, as well as data on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) binding and MHC ligand elution experiments. The database represents the molecular structures recognized by adaptive immune receptors and the experimental contexts in which these molecules were determined to be immune epitopes. Epitopes recognized in humans, nonhuman primates, rodents, pigs, cats and all other tested species are included. Both positive and negative experimental results are captured. Over the course of 4 years, the data from 180,978 experiments were curated manually from the literature, which covers approximately 99% of all publicly available information on peptide epitopes mapped in infectious agents (excluding HIV) and 93% of those mapped in allergens. In addition, data that would otherwise be unavailable to the public from 129,186 experiments were submitted directly by investigators. The curation of epitopes related to autoimmunity is expected to be completed by the end of 2010. The database can be queried by epitope structure, source organism, MHC restriction, assay type or host organism, among other criteria. The database structure, as well as its querying, browsing and reporting interfaces, was completely redesigned for the IEDB 2.0 release, which became publicly available in early 2009.
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Classification of the universe of immune epitope literature: representation and knowledge gaps.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-05-2009
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A significant fraction of the more than 18 million scientific articles currently indexed in the PubMed database are related to immune responses to various agents, including infectious microbes, autoantigens, allergens, transplants, cancer antigens and others. The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) is an online repository that catalogs immune epitope reactivity data derived from articles listed in the National Library of Medicine PubMed database. The IEDB is maintained and continually updated by monitoring PubMed for new, potentially relevant references.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.