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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
The Arctic A?PP mutation leads to Alzheimers disease pathology with highly variable topographic deposition of differentially truncated A?.
Acta Neuropathol Commun
PUBLISHED: 08-05-2013
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The Arctic mutation (p.E693G/p.E22G)fs within the ?-amyloid (A?) region of the ?-amyloid precursor protein gene causes an autosomal dominant disease with clinical picture of typical Alzheimers disease. Here we report the special character of Arctic AD neuropathology in four deceased patients.
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CALHM1 P86L polymorphism does not alter amyloid-beta or tau in cerebrospinal fluid.
Neurosci. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 10-22-2009
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Recently, the P86L alteration in CALHM1 (calcium homeostasis modulator-1) was reported to be associated with Alzheimers disease (AD). Moreover, the risk allele increased amyloid-beta (A beta) levels in conditioned media from cultured cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that CALHM1 P86L may modulate A beta or tau levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Nearly 200 individuals with AD or other cognitive disorders were included for CSF analysis and CALHM1 genotyping. No significant differences in CSF levels of A beta 42, tau or phospho-tau were found across the various CALHM1 genotypes. In conclusion, we found no evidence that CALHM1 P86L is associated with altered CSF levels of the investigated AD biomarkers.
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No evidence of PGRN or MAPT gene dosage alterations in a collection of patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration.
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord
PUBLISHED: 08-03-2009
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Alterations in gene dosage have recently been associated with neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimers disease and Parkinsons disease, and deletions of the progranulin (PGRN) locus were recently described in patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). FTLD is a genetically complex neurodegenerative disorder with mutations in the PGRN and the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) genes being the most common known causes of familial FTLD. In this study, we investigated 39 patients with FTLD, previously found negative for mutations in PGRN and MAPT, for copy number alterations of these 2 genes.
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Frontotemporal dementia in a large Swedish family is caused by a progranulin null mutation.
Neurogenetics
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2009
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Mutations in the progranulin (PGRN) gene have recently been identified in families with frontotemporal lobar degeneration and ubiquitin-positive brain inclusions linked to chromosome 17q21. We have previously described a Swedish family displaying frontotemporal dementia with rapid progression and linkage to chromosome 17q21. In this study, we performed an extended clinical and neuropathological investigation of affected members of the family and a genetic analysis of the PGRN gene. There was a large variation of the initial presenting symptoms in this family, but common clinical features were non-fluent aphasia and loss of spontaneous speech as well as personality and behavioural changes. Mean age at onset was 54 years with disease duration of close to 4 years. Neuropathological examination revealed frontotemporal neurodegeneration with ubiquitin and TAR DNA binding protein-43 immunoreactive intraneuronal inclusions. Mutation screening of the PGRN gene identified a 1 bp deletion in exon 1 causing a frameshift of the coding sequence and introducing a premature termination codon in exon 2 (Gly35GlufsX19). Analysis of PGRN messenger RNA (mRNA) levels revealed a considerable decrease in lymphoblasts from mutation carriers and fragment size separation, and sequence analysis confirmed that the mutated mRNA allele was almost absent in these samples. In conclusion, the PGRN Gly35fs mutation causes frontotemporal dementia with variable clinical presentation in a large Swedish family, most likely through nonsense-mediated decay of mutant PGRN mRNA and resulting haploinsufficiency.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.