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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
A multiplex high-throughput gene expression assay to simultaneously detect disease and functional markers in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium.
Stem Cells Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 05-29-2014
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There is continuing interest in the development of lineage-specific cells from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for use in cell therapies and drug discovery. Although in most cases differentiated cells show features of the desired lineage, they retain fetal gene expression and do not fully mature into "adult-like" cells. Such cells may not serve as an effective therapy because, once implanted, immature cells pose the risk of uncontrolled growth. Therefore, there is a need to optimize lineage-specific stem cell differentiation protocols to produce cells that no longer express fetal genes and have attained "adult-like" phenotypes. Toward that goal, it is critical to develop assays that simultaneously measure cell function and disease markers in high-throughput format. Here, we use a multiplex high-throughput gene expression assay that simultaneously detects endogenous expression of multiple developmental, functional, and disease markers in iPS cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We optimized protocols to differentiate iPS cell-derived RPE that was then grown in 96- and 384-well plates. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate differential expression of eight genes in iPS cells, iPS cell-derived RPE at two different differentiation stages, and primary human RPE using this multiplex assay. The data obtained from the multiplex gene expression assay are significantly correlated with standard quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-based measurements, confirming the ability of this high-throughput assay to measure relevant gene expression changes. This assay provides the basis to screen for compounds that improve RPE function and maturation and target disease pathways, thus providing the basis for effective treatments of several retinal degenerative diseases.
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CORTECON: a temporal transcriptome analysis of in vitro human cerebral cortex development from human embryonic stem cells.
Neuron
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2014
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Many neurological and psychiatric disorders affect the cerebral cortex, and a clearer understanding of the molecular processes underlying human corticogenesis will provide greater insight into such pathologies. To date, knowledge of gene expression changes accompanying corticogenesis is largely based on murine data. Here we present a searchable, comprehensive, temporal gene expression data set encompassing cerebral cortical development from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Using a modified differentiation protocol that yields neurons suggestive of prefrontal cortex, we identified sets of genes and long noncoding RNAs that significantly change during corticogenesis and those enriched for disease-associations. Numerous alternatively spliced genes with varying temporal patterns of expression are revealed, including TGIF1, involved in holoprosencephaly, and MARK1, involved in autism. We have created a database (http://cortecon.neuralsci.org/) that provides online, query-based access to changes in RNA expression and alternatively spliced transcripts during human cortical development.
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Visualization and correction of automated segmentation, tracking and lineaging from 5-D stem cell image sequences.
BMC Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 04-22-2014
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Neural stem cells are motile and proliferative cells that undergo mitosis, dividing to produce daughter cells and ultimately generating differentiated neurons and glia. Understanding the mechanisms controlling neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation will play a key role in the emerging fields of regenerative medicine and cancer therapeutics. Stem cell studies in vitro from 2-D image data are well established. Visualizing and analyzing large three dimensional images of intact tissue is a challenging task. It becomes more difficult as the dimensionality of the image data increases to include time and additional fluorescence channels. There is a pressing need for 5-D image analysis and visualization tools to study cellular dynamics in the intact niche and to quantify the role that environmental factors play in determining cell fate.
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Stem cells for retinal repair.
Dev Ophthalmol
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2014
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Remarkable progress over the past decade has led to the first clinical studies of stem cell therapy for retinal disease. The unique access retina offers for implantation, monitoring, and ablation is well suited for stem cell trials, and retinal applications have now moved to the forefront of the field of regenerative medicine. Retinal progeny derived from either pluripotent stem cells or tissue-specific retinal and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) stem cells have the capacity both to replace damaged retina and to provide trophic support that slows disease progression. In contrast, bone marrow and neural stem cells produce nonretinal progeny that provide trophic support but with limited integration and capacity to differentiate into retinal progeny that can replace damaged retinal tissue. Embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells differentiated into neural retinal and RPE progeny provide an unlimited supply of human cells for transplantation and disease modeling but raise the risks of aberrant differentiation and over proliferation. Tissue-specific stem cells isolated from neural retina or RPE that are naturally committed to retinal fates have a restricted lineage potential that improves the margin of safety. This improved safety of retina and RPE stem cells is balanced, however, by a restricted proliferative potential, which limits the quantity of progeny produced. In this chapter, we review the types of stem cells under development for retinal therapy.
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Human RPE stem cells grown into polarized RPE monolayers on a polyester matrix are maintained after grafting into rabbit subretinal space.
Stem Cell Reports
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2014
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Transplantation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is being developed as a cell-replacement therapy for age-related macular degeneration. Human embryonic stem cell (hESC) and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived RPE are currently translating toward clinic. We introduce the adult human RPE stem cell (hRPESC) as an alternative RPE source. Polarized monolayers of adult hRPESC-derived RPE grown on polyester (PET) membranes had near-native characteristics. Trephined pieces of RPE monolayers on PET were transplanted subretinally in the rabbit, a large-eyed animal model. After 4 days, retinal edema was observed above the implant, detected by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and fundoscopy. At 1 week, retinal atrophy overlying the fetal or adult transplant was observed, remaining stable thereafter. Histology obtained 4 weeks after implantation confirmed a continuous polarized human RPE monolayer on PET. Taken together, the xeno-RPE survived with retained characteristics in the subretinal space. These experiments support that adult hRPESC-derived RPE are a potential source for transplantation therapies.
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Neural stem cells: generating and regenerating the brain.
Neuron
PUBLISHED: 11-05-2013
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One of the landmark events of the past 25 years in neuroscience research was the establishment of neural stem cells (NSCs) as a life-long source of neurons and glia, a concept that shattered the dogma that the nervous system lacked regenerative power. Stem cells afford the plasticity to generate, repair, and change nervous system function. Combined with reprogramming technology, human somatic cell-derived NSCs and their progeny can model neurological diseases with improved accuracy. As technology advances, we anticipate further important discoveries and novel therapies based on the knowledge and application of these powerful cells.
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Chronic oxidative stress upregulates Drusen-related protein expression in adult human RPE stem cell-derived RPE cells: a novel culture model for dry AMD.
Aging (Albany NY)
PUBLISHED: 08-29-2013
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The goal of this study was to examine changes in the expression of transcripts and proteins associated with drusen in Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) after exposing human retinal pigment epithelium (hRPE) cells to chronic oxidative stress.
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The culture and maintenance of functional retinal pigment epithelial monolayers from adult human eye.
Methods Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-30-2013
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The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is implicated in many eye diseases, including age-related macular degeneration, and therefore isolating and culturing these cells from recently deceased adult human donors is the ideal source for disease studies. Adult RPE could also be used as a cell source for transplantation therapy for RPE degenerative disease, likely requiring first in vitro expansion of the cells obtained from a patient. Previous protocols have successfully extracted RPE from adult donors; however improvements in yield, cell survival, and functionality are needed. We describe here a protocol optimized for adult human tissue that yields expanded cultures of RPE with morphological, phenotypic, and functional characteristics similar to freshly isolated RPE. These cells can be expanded and cultured for several months without senescence, gross cell death, or undergoing morphological changes. The protocol takes around a month to obtain functional RPE monolayers with accurate morphological characteristics and normal protein expression, as shown through immunohistochemistry analysis, RNA expression profiles via quantitative PCR (qPCR), and transepithelial resistance (TER) measurements. Included in this chapter are steps used to extract RPE from human adult globes, cell culture, cell splitting, cell bleaching, immunohistochemistry, and qPCR for RPE markers, and TER measurements as functional test.
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Sustained levels of FGF2 maintain undifferentiated stem cell cultures with biweekly feeding.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2013
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An essential aspect of stem cell culture is the successful maintenance of the undifferentiated state. Many types of stem cells are FGF2 dependent, and pluripotent stem cells are maintained by replacing FGF2-containing media daily, while tissue-specific stem cells are typically fed every 3rd day. Frequent feeding, however, results in significant variation in growth factor levels due to FGF2 instability, which limits effective maintenance due to spontaneous differentiation. We report that stabilization of FGF2 levels using controlled release PLGA microspheres improves expression of stem cell markers, increases stem cell numbers and decreases spontaneous differentiation. The controlled release FGF2 additive reduces the frequency of media changes needed to maintain stem cell cultures, so that human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells can be maintained successfully with biweekly feedings.
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Mouse TU tagging: a chemical/genetic intersectional method for purifying cell type-specific nascent RNA.
Genes Dev.
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2013
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Transcriptional profiling is a powerful approach for understanding development and disease. Current cell type-specific RNA purification methods have limitations, including cell dissociation trauma or inability to identify all RNA species. Here, we describe "mouse thiouracil (TU) tagging," a genetic and chemical intersectional method for covalent labeling and purification of cell type-specific RNA in vivo. Cre-induced expression of uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) provides spatial specificity; injection of 4-thiouracil (4TU) provides temporal specificity. Only UPRT(+) cells exposed to 4TU produce thio-RNA, which is then purified for RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). This method can purify transcripts from spatially complex and rare (<5%) cells, such as Tie2:Cre(+) brain endothelia/microglia (76% validated by expression pattern), or temporally dynamic transcripts, such as those acutely induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. Moreover, generating chimeric mice via UPRT(+) bone marrow transplants identifies immune versus niche spleen RNA. TU tagging provides a novel method for identifying actively transcribed genes in specific cells at specific times within intact mice.
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Vertebrate neural stem cell segmentation, tracking and lineaging with validation and editing.
Nat Protoc
PUBLISHED: 11-17-2011
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This protocol and the accompanying software program called LEVER (lineage editing and validation) enable quantitative automated analysis of phase-contrast time-lapse images of cultured neural stem cells. Images are captured at 5-min intervals over a period of 5-15 d as the cells proliferate and differentiate. LEVER automatically segments, tracks and generates lineage trees of the stem cells from the image sequence. In addition to generating lineage trees capturing the population dynamics of clonal development, LEVER extracts quantitative phenotypic measurements of cell location, shape, movement and size. When available, the system can include biomolecular markers imaged using fluorescence. It then displays the results to the user for highly efficient inspection and editing to correct any errors in the segmentation, tracking or lineaging. To enable high-throughput inspection, LEVER incorporates features for rapid identification of errors and for learning from user-supplied corrections to automatically identify and correct related errors.
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Stem cells for retinal replacement therapy.
Neurotherapeutics
PUBLISHED: 09-28-2011
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Retinal degenerative disease has limited therapeutic options and the possibility of stem cell-mediated regenerative treatments is being actively explored for these blinding retinal conditions. The relative accessibility of this central nervous system tissue and the ability to visually monitor changes after transplantation make the retina and adjacent retinal pigment epithelium prime targets for pioneering stem cell therapeutics. Prior work conducted for several decades indicated the promise of cell transplantation for retinal disease, and new strategies that combine these established surgical approaches with stem cell-derived donor cells is ongoing. A variety of tissue-specific and pluripotent-derived donor cells are being advanced to replace lost or damaged retinal cells and/or to slow the disease processes by providing neuroprotective factors, with the ultimate aim of long-term improvement in visual function. Clinical trials are in the early stages, and data on safety and efficacy are widely anticipated. Positive outcomes from these stem cell-based clinical studies would radically change the way that blinding disorders are approached in the clinic.
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Translating stem cell studies to the clinic for CNS repair: current state of the art and the need for a Rosetta stone.
Neuron
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2011
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Since their discovery twenty years ago and prospective isolation a decade later, neural stem cells (NSCs), their progenitors, and differentiated cell derivatives along with other stem-cell based strategies have advanced steadily toward clinical trials, spurred by the immense need to find reparative therapeutics for central nervous system (CNS) diseases and injury. Current phase I/II trials using stem cells in the CNS are the vanguard for the widely anticipated next generation of regenerative therapies and as such are pioneering the stem cell therapy process. While translation has typically been the purview of industry, academic researchers are increasingly driven to bring their findings toward treatments and face challenges in knowledge gap and resource access that are accentuated by the unique financial, manufacturing, scientific, and regulatory aspects of cell therapy. Solutions are envisioned that both address the significant unmet medical need and lead to increased funding for basic and translational research.
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Adult SVZ lineage cells home to and leave the vascular niche via differential responses to SDF1/CXCR4 signaling.
Cell Stem Cell
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2010
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Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in the adult subventricular zone (SVZ) are associated with ependymal and vasculature niches, which regulate stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Activated Type B stem cells and their progeny, the transit-amplifying type C cells, which express EGFR, are most highly associated with vascular cells, indicating that this niche supports lineage progression. Here, we show that proliferative SVZ progenitor cells home to endothelial cells in a stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF1)- and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4)-dependent manner. We show that SDF1 strongly upregulates EGFR and alpha6 integrin in activated type B and type C cells, enhancing their activated state and their ability to bind laminin in the vascular niche. SDF1 increases the motility of type A neuroblasts, which migrate from the SVZ toward the olfactory bulb. Thus, differential responses to SDF1 can regulate progenitor cell occupancy of and exit from the adult SVZ vascular niche.
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Spred1, a negative regulator of Ras-MAPK-ERK, is enriched in CNS germinal zones, dampens NSC proliferation, and maintains ventricular zone structure.
Genes Dev.
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2010
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Neural stem cells (NSCs) have great potential for self-renewal, which must be tightly regulated to generate appropriate cell numbers during development and to prevent tumor formation. The Ras-MAPK-ERK pathway affects mitogen-stimulated proliferation, and negative regulators are likely to be important for keeping self-renewal in check. Sprouty-related protein with an EVH1 domain (Spred1) is a recently discovered negative Ras-MAPK-ERK regulator linked to a neurofibromatosis 1 (NF-1)-like human syndrome; however, its role in CNS development has not been explored. We show that Spred1 is highly enriched in CNS germinal zones during neurogenesis. Spred1 knockdown increases NSC self-renewal and progenitor proliferation cell-autonomously, and overexpression causes premature differentiation. Surprisingly, Spred1 knockdown in vivo in the embryonic mouse forebrain frequently resulted in periventricular heterotopia, developmental abnormalities often associated with mutations in genes in the vesicular trafficking pathway that cause disruption of germinal zones and impair cell migration. In cortical progenitor cells, Spred1 localizes within distinct vesicles, indicating a potential role in transport. Spred1 knockdown gradually leads to disruption of the apical ventricular zone and loss of radial glia alignment. This impairs late neuronal migration, resulting in the formation of periventricular masses. Thus, Spred1 is critical for normal cortical development, as it modulates progenitor self-renewal/proliferation and helps maintain the integrity and organization of germinal zones.
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Sense and serendipity aid RPE generation.
Cell Stem Cell
PUBLISHED: 10-03-2009
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Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a valuable cell type for a number of blinding disorders. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Idelson et al. (2009) use Nicotinamide and Activin A to markedly improve RPE yield from human embryonic stem cells.
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Baby got brain: Fgf10 sets rostral cortical size.
Neuron
PUBLISHED: 07-18-2009
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Brain growth occurs throughout embryogenesis and early postnatal life, but its foundation is laid in the primitive neuroepithelium. In this issue of Neuron, Sahara and OLeary identify Fgf10 as a key regulator of the neuroepithelial to radial glial transition and subsequently of size of the rostral forebrain.
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Automatic summarization of changes in biological image sequences using algorithmic information theory.
IEEE Trans Pattern Anal Mach Intell
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2009
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An algorithmic information-theoretic method is presented for object-level summarization of meaningful changes in image sequences. Object extraction and tracking data are represented as an attributed tracking graph (ATG). Time courses of object states are compared using an adaptive information distance measure, aided by a closed-form multidimensional quantization. The notion of meaningful summarization is captured by using the gap statistic to estimate the randomness deficiency from algorithmic statistics. The summary is the clustering result and feature subset that maximize the gap statistic. This approach was validated on four bioimaging applications: 1) It was applied to a synthetic data set containing two populations of cells differing in the rate of growth, for which it correctly identified the two populations and the single feature out of 23 that separated them; 2) it was applied to 59 movies of three types of neuroprosthetic devices being inserted in the brain tissue at three speeds each, for which it correctly identified insertion speed as the primary factor affecting tissue strain; 3) when applied to movies of cultured neural progenitor cells, it correctly distinguished neurons from progenitors without requiring the use of a fixative stain; and 4) when analyzing intracellular molecular transport in cultured neurons undergoing axon specification, it automatically confirmed the role of kinesins in axon specification.
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Cell types to order: temporal specification of CNS stem cells.
Curr. Opin. Neurobiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2009
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Spatial and temporal specification of neural progenitor cells is integral to their production of a wide variety of central nervous system (CNS) cells. For a given region, cells arise on a precise and predictable temporal schedule, with sub-types of neurons appearing in a defined order, followed by glial cell generation. Single cell studies have shown that the timing of cell generation can be encoded within individual early progenitor cells as a cell-intrinsic program. Environmental cues are important modulators of this program, allowing it to unfold and coordinating the process within the embryo. Here we review recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of epigenetic and transcription factor regulation, which are involved in temporal specification of CNS stem cells.
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Bmi-1 cooperates with Foxg1 to maintain neural stem cell self-renewal in the forebrain.
Genes Dev.
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2009
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Neural stem cells (NSCs) persist throughout life in two forebrain areas: the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the hippocampus. Why forebrain NSCs self-renew more extensively than those from other regions remains unclear. Prior studies have shown that the polycomb factor Bmi-1 is necessary for NSC self-renewal and that it represses the cell cycle inhibitors p16, p19, and p21. Here we show that overexpression of Bmi-1 enhances self-renewal of forebrain NSCs significantly more than those derived from spinal cord, demonstrating a regional difference in responsiveness. We show that forebrain NSCs require the forebrain-specific transcription factor Foxg1 for Bmi-1-dependent self-renewal, and that repression of p21 is a focus of this interaction. Bmi-1 enhancement of NSC self-renewal is significantly greater with increasing age and passage. Importantly, when Bmi-1 is overexpressed in cultured adult forebrain NSCs, they expand dramatically and continue to make neurons even after multiple passages, when control NSCs have become restricted to glial differentiation. Together these findings demonstrate the importance of Bmi-1 and Foxg1 cooperation to maintenance of NSC multipotency and self-renewal, and establish a useful method for generating abundant forebrain neurons ex vivo, outside the neurogenic niche.
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Cell lineage tree models of neurogenesis.
J. Theor. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2009
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The production of neurons to form the mammalian cortex, known as embryonic cortical neurogenesis, is a complex developmental process. Insight into the process of cell division during neurogenesis is provided by murine cortical cell lineage trees, recorded through experimental observation. Recurring patterns within cell lineage trees may be indicative of predetermined cell behaviour. The application of mathematical modelling to this process requires careful consideration and identification of the key features to be incorporated into the model. A biologically plausible stochastic model of evolution of cell lineage trees is developed, based on the most important known features of neurogenesis. Tractable means of measuring lineage tree shape are discussed. Symmetry is identified as a significant feature of shape and is measured using Collesss Index of Imbalance. Distributions of tree size and imbalance for large tree sizes are computed and results compared to experimental data. Several refinements to the model are investigated, when the cell division probabilities are weighted according to cell generation. Two models involving generation-dependent cell division probabilities produce imbalance distributions which are the most consistent with the available experimental results. The results indicate that a stochastic cell division mechanism is a plausible basis of mammalian neurogenesis.
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Identifying the perpetrator in medulloblastoma: Dorian Gray versus Benjamin Button.
Cancer Cell
PUBLISHED: 02-03-2009
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Tumors contain a subpopulation of tumor-propagating cells (TPCs) that are critical for their growth. In this issue, Read, Wechsler-Reya, and colleagues show that in an animal model of medulloblastoma, TPCs express the surface marker CD15 and have properties distinct from neural stem cells.
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Ophthalmologic stem cell transplantation therapies.
Regen Med
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Vision loss is a major social issue, with more than 20 million people over the age of 18 years affected in the USA alone. Loss of vision is feared more than premature death or cardiovascular disease, according to a recent Society for Consumer Research group survey. The annual direct cost of medical care for the most prevalent eye disease, age-related macular degeneration, was estimated at US$255 billion in 2010 with an additional economic impact of US$88 billion due to lost productivity and the burden of family and community care for visual disability. With the blossoming of human stem cell research, regenerative treatments are now being developed that can help reduce this burden. Positive results from animal studies demonstrate that stem cell-based transplants can preserve and potentially improve vision. This has led to new clinical trials for several eye diseases that are yielding encouraging results. In the next few years, additional trials and longer-term results are anticipated to further develop ocular regenerative therapies, with the potential to revolutionize our approach to ophthalmic disease and damage.
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The niche factor syndecan-1 regulates the maintenance and proliferation of neural progenitor cells during mammalian cortical development.
PLoS ONE
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Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) divide and differentiate in a precisely regulated manner over time to achieve the remarkable expansion and assembly of the layered mammalian cerebral cortex. Both intrinsic signaling pathways and environmental factors control the behavior of NPCs during cortical development. Heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPG) are critical environmental regulators that help modulate and integrate environmental cues and downstream intracellular signals. Syndecan-1 (Sdc1), a major transmembrane HSPG, is highly enriched in the early neural germinal zone, but its function in modulating NPC behavior and cortical development has not been explored. In this study we investigate the expression pattern and function of Sdc1 in the developing mouse cerebral cortex. We found that Sdc1 is highly expressed by cortical NPCs. Knockdown of Sdc1 in vivo by in utero electroporation reduces NPC proliferation and causes their premature differentiation, corroborated in isolated cells in vitro. We found that Sdc1 knockdown leads to reduced levels of ?-catenin, indicating reduced canonical Wnt signaling. Consistent with this, GSK3? inhibition helps rescue the Sdc1 knockdown phenotype, partially restoring NPC number and proliferation. Moreover, exogenous Wnt protein promotes cortical NPC proliferation, but this is prevented by Sdc1 knockdown. Thus, Sdc1 in the germinal niche is a key HSPG regulating the maintenance and proliferation of NPCs during cortical neurogenesis, in part by modulating the ability of NPCs to respond to Wnt ligands.
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Asymmetric segregation of the double-stranded RNA binding protein Staufen2 during mammalian neural stem cell divisions promotes lineage progression.
Cell Stem Cell
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Asymmetric cell divisions are a fundamental feature of neural development, and misregulation can lead to brain abnormalities or tumor formation. During an asymmetric cell division, molecular determinants are segregated preferentially into one daughter cell to specify its fate. An important goal is to identify the asymmetric determinants in neural progenitor cells, which could be tumor suppressors or inducers of specific neural fates. Here, we show that the double-stranded RNA-binding protein Stau2 is distributed asymmetrically during progenitor divisions in the developing mouse cortex, preferentially segregating into the Tbr2(+) neuroblast daughter, taking with it a subset of RNAs. Knockdown of Stau2 stimulates differentiation and overexpression produces periventricular neuronal masses, demonstrating its functional importance for normal cortical development. We immunoprecipitated Stau2 to examine its cargo mRNAs, and found enrichment for known asymmetric and basal cell determinants, such as Trim32, and identified candidates, including a subset involved in primary cilium function.
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VCAM1 is essential to maintain the structure of the SVZ niche and acts as an environmental sensor to regulate SVZ lineage progression.
Cell Stem Cell
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Neurons arise in the adult forebrain subventricular zone (SVZ) from Type B neural stem cells (NSCs), raising considerable interest in the molecules that maintain this life-long neurogenic niche. Type B cells are anchored by specialized apical endfeet in the center of a pinwheel of ependymal cells. Here we show that the apical endfeet express high levels of the adhesion and signaling molecule vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM1). Disruption of VCAM1 in vivo causes loss of the pinwheels, disrupted SVZ cytoarchitecture, proliferation and depletion of the normally quiescent apical Type B cells, and increased neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb, demonstrating a key role in niche structure and function. We show that VCAM1 signals via NOX2 production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to maintain NSCs. VCAM1 on Type B cells is increased by IL-1?, demonstrating that it can act as an environmental sensor, responding to chemokines involved in tissue repair.
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Molecular characterisation of transport mechanisms at the developing mouse blood-CSF interface: a transcriptome approach.
PLoS ONE
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Exchange mechanisms across the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier in the choroid plexuses within the cerebral ventricles control access of molecules to the central nervous system, especially in early development when the brain is poorly vascularised. However, little is known about their molecular or developmental characteristics. We examined the transcriptome of lateral ventricular choroid plexus in embryonic day 15 (E15) and adult mice. Numerous genes identified in the adult were expressed at similar levels at E15, indicating substantial plexus maturity early in development. Some genes coding for key functions (intercellular/tight junctions, influx/efflux transporters) changed expression during development and their expression patterns are discussed in the context of available physiological/permeability results in the developing brain. Three genes: Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc), Glycophorin A (Gypa) and C (Gypc), were identified as those whose gene products are candidates to target plasma proteins to choroid plexus cells. These were investigated using quantitative- and single-cell-PCR on plexus epithelial cells that were albumin- or total plasma protein-immunopositive. Results showed a significant degree of concordance between plasma protein/albumin immunoreactivity and expression of the putative transporters. Immunohistochemistry identified SPARC and GYPA in choroid plexus epithelial cells in the embryo with a subcellular distribution that was consistent with transport of albumin from blood to cerebrospinal fluid. In adult plexus this pattern of immunostaining was absent. We propose a model of the cellular mechanism in which SPARC and GYPA, together with identified vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs) may act as receptors/transporters in developmentally regulated transfer of plasma proteins at the blood-CSF interface.
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The effect of long-term release of Shh from implanted biodegradable microspheres on recovery from spinal cord injury in mice.
Biomaterials
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After spinal cord injury (SCI), loss of cells and damage to ascending and descending tracts can result in paralysis. Current treatments for SCI are based on patient stabilization, and much-needed regenerative therapies are still under development. To activate and instruct stem and progenitor cells or injured tissue to aid SCI repair, it is important to modify the injury environment for a protracted period, to allow time for cell activation, proliferation and appropriate fate differentiation. Shh plays a critical role in spinal cord formation, being involved in multiple processes: it promotes production of motor neurons and oligodendrocytes from ventral cord progenitor cells and serves as an axon guidance molecule. Hence Shh is a candidate pleiotropic beneficial environmental factor for spinal cord regeneration. Here we show that administration of biodegradable microspheres that provide sustained, controlled delivery of Shh resulted in significant functional improvement in two different mouse models of SCI: contusion and dorsal hemioversection. The mechanism is multifactorial, involving increased proliferation of endogenous NG2+ oligodendrocyte lineage cells, decreased astrocytic scar formation and increased sprouting and growth of corticospinal (CST) and raphespinal tract (RST) fibers. Thus, long-term administration of Shh is a potential valuable therapeutic intervention for SCI.
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Adult human RPE can be activated into a multipotent stem cell that produces mesenchymal derivatives.
Cell Stem Cell
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The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a monolayer of cells underlying and supporting the neural retina. It begins as a plastic tissue, capable, in some species, of generating lens and retina, but differentiates early in development and remains normally nonproliferative throughout life. Here we show that a subpopulation of adult human RPE cells can be activated in vitro to a self-renewing cell, the retinal pigment epithelial stem cell (RPESC) that loses RPE markers, proliferates extensively, and can redifferentiate into stable cobblestone RPE monolayers. Clonal studies demonstrate that RPESCs are multipotent and in defined conditions can generate both neural and mesenchymal progeny. This plasticity may explain human pathologies in which mesenchymal fates are seen in the eye, for example in proliferative vitroretinopathy (PVR) and phthisis bulbi. This study establishes the RPESC as an accessible, human CNS-derived multipotent stem cell, useful for the study of fate choice, replacement therapy, and disease modeling.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.