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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Floral trait variation and integration as a function of sexual deception in Gorteria diffusa.
Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 07-09-2014
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Phenotypic integration, the coordinated covariance of suites of morphological traits, is critical for proper functioning of organisms. Angiosperm flowers are complex structures comprising suites of traits that function together to achieve effective pollen transfer. Floral integration could reflect shared genetic and developmental control of these traits, or could arise through pollinator-imposed stabilizing correlational selection on traits. We sought to expose mechanisms underlying floral trait integration in the sexually deceptive daisy, Gorteria diffusa, by testing the hypothesis that stabilizing selection imposed by male pollinators on floral traits involved in mimicry has resulted in tighter integration. To do this, we quantified patterns of floral trait variance and covariance in morphologically divergent G. diffusa floral forms representing a continuum in the levels of sexual deception. We show that integration of traits functioning in visual attraction of male pollinators increases with pollinator deception, and is stronger than integration of non-mimicry trait modules. Consistent patterns of within-population trait variance and covariance across floral forms suggest that integration has not been built by stabilizing correlational selection on genetically independent traits. Instead pollinator specialization has selected for tightened integration within modules of linked traits. Despite potentially strong constraint on morphological evolution imposed by developmental genetic linkages between traits, we demonstrate substantial divergence in traits across G. diffusa floral forms and show that divergence has often occurred without altering within-population patterns of trait correlations.
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Paralogous radiations of PIN proteins with multiple origins of noncanonical PIN structure.
Mol. Biol. Evol.
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2014
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The plant hormone auxin is a conserved regulator of development which has been implicated in the generation of morphological novelty. PIN-FORMED1 (PIN) auxin efflux carriers are central to auxin function by regulating its distribution. PIN family members have divergent structures and cellular localizations, but the origin and evolutionary significance of this variation is unresolved. To characterize PIN family evolution, we have undertaken phylogenetic and structural analyses with a massive increase in taxon sampling over previous studies. Our phylogeny shows that following the divergence of the bryophyte and lycophyte lineages, two deep duplication events gave rise to three distinct lineages of PIN proteins in euphyllophytes. Subsequent independent radiations within each of these lineages were taxonomically asymmetric, giving rise to at least 21 clades of PIN proteins, of which 15 are revealed here for the first time. Although most PIN protein clades share a conserved canonical structure with a modular central loop domain, a small number of noncanonical clades dispersed across the phylogeny have highly divergent protein structure. We propose that PIN proteins underwent sub- and neofunctionalization with substantial modification to protein structure throughout plant evolution. Our results have important implications for plant evolution as they suggest that structurally divergent PIN proteins that arose in paralogous radiations contributed to the convergent evolution of organ systems in different land plant lineages.
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A promiscuous intermediate underlies the evolution of LEAFY DNA binding specificity.
Science
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2014
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Transcription factors (TFs) are key players in evolution. Changes affecting their function can yield novel life forms but may also have deleterious effects. Consequently, gene duplication events that release one gene copy from selective pressure are thought to be the common mechanism by which TFs acquire new activities. Here, we show that LEAFY, a major regulator of flower development and cell division in land plants, underwent changes to its DNA binding specificity, even though plant genomes generally contain a single copy of the LEAFY gene. We examined how these changes occurred at the structural level and identify an intermediate LEAFY form in hornworts that appears to adopt all different specificities. This promiscuous intermediate could have smoothed the evolutionary transitions, thereby allowing LEAFY to evolve new binding specificities while remaining a single-copy gene.
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Living stones reveal alternative petal identity programs within the core eudicots.
Plant J.
PUBLISHED: 11-23-2011
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Petals, defined as the showy laminar floral organs in the second floral whorl, have been shown to be under similar genetic control in distantly related core eudicot model organisms. On the basis of these findings, it is commonly assumed that the petal identity program regulated by B-class MADS-box gene homologs is invariant across the core eudicot clade. However, the core eudicots, which comprise >70% of angiosperm species, exhibit numerous instances of petal and sepal loss, transference of petal function between floral whorls, and recurrent petal evolution. In the face of these complex patterns of perianth evolution, the concept of a core eudicot petal identity program has not been tested. We therefore examined the petal identity program in the Caryophyllales, a core eudicot clade in which perianth differentiation into sepals and petals has evolved multiple times. Specifically, we analyzed the expression patterns of B- and C-class MADS-box homologs for evidence of a conserved petal identity program between sepal-derived and stamen-derived petaloid organs in the living stone family Aizoaceae. We found that neither sepal-derived nor stamen-derived petaloid organs exhibit gene expression patterns consistent with the core eudicot petal identity program. B-class gene homologs are not expressed during the development of sepal-derived petals and are not implicated in petal identity in stamen-derived petals, as their transient expression coincides with early expression of the C-class homolog. We therefore provide evidence for petal development that is independent of B-class genes and suggest that different genetic control of petal identity has evolved within this lineage of core eudicots. These findings call for a more comprehensive understanding of perianth variation and its genetic causes within the core eudicots--an endeavor that will have broader implications for the interpretation of perianth evolution across angiosperms.
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Complex pigment evolution in the Caryophyllales.
New Phytol.
PUBLISHED: 06-30-2011
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Carotenoids and flavonoids including anthocyanins are the predominant pigments in flowering plants, where they play important roles in pollination, seed dispersal, protection against stress and signalling. In certain families within the Pentapetalae order Caryophyllales, an unusual class of pigments, known as betalains, replaces the more common anthocyanins. This isolated occurrence of betalains in the Caryophyllales has stimulated over half a century of debate and experimentation. Numerous hypotheses have been suggested to explain the phylogenetically restricted occurrence of betalains and their apparent mutual exclusion with anthocyanins. In this review, we evaluate these hypotheses in the face of a changing interpretation of Caryophyllales phylogeny and new comparative genetic data. Phylogenetic analyses expose substantial gaps in our knowledge of the early evolution of pigments in the Caryophyllales and suggest pigmentation to be much more labile than previously recognized. Reconstructions of character evolution imply multiple switches from betalain to anthocyanin pigmentation, but also allow for possible multiple origins of betalains. Comparative genetic studies propose possible mechanisms underlying switches between pigment types and suggest that transcriptional down-regulation of late-acting enzymes is responsible for a loss of anthocyanins. Given these insights from molecular phylogenetics and comparative genetics, we discuss outstanding questions and define key goals for future research.
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Angiosperm phylogeny: 17 genes, 640 taxa.
Am. J. Bot.
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2011
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Recent analyses employing up to five genes have provided numerous insights into angiosperm phylogeny, but many relationships have remained unresolved or poorly supported. In the hope of improving our understanding of angiosperm phylogeny, we expanded sampling of taxa and genes beyond previous analyses.
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Conservation and canalization of gene expression during angiosperm diversification accompany the origin and evolution of the flower.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 12-13-2010
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The origin and rapid diversification of the angiosperms (Darwins "Abominable Mystery") has engaged generations of researchers. Here, we examine the floral genetic programs of phylogenetically pivotal angiosperms (water lily, avocado, California poppy, and Arabidopsis) and a nonflowering seed plant (a cycad) to obtain insight into the origin and subsequent evolution of the flower. Transcriptional cascades with broadly overlapping spatial domains, resembling the hypothesized ancestral gymnosperm program, are deployed across morphologically intergrading organs in water lily and avocado flowers. In contrast, spatially discrete transcriptional programs in distinct floral organs characterize the more recently derived angiosperm lineages represented by California poppy and Arabidopsis. Deep evolutionary conservation in the genetic programs of putatively homologous floral organs traces to those operating in gymnosperm reproductive cones. Female gymnosperm cones and angiosperm carpels share conserved genetic features, which may be associated with the ovule developmental program common to both organs. However, male gymnosperm cones share genetic features with both perianth (sterile attractive and protective) organs and stamens, supporting the evolutionary origin of the floral perianth from the male genetic program of seed plants.
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A contoured gap coaxial plasma gun with injected plasma armature.
Rev Sci Instrum
PUBLISHED: 09-04-2009
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A new coaxial plasma gun is described. The long term objective is to accelerate 100-200 microg of plasma with density above 10(17) cm(-3) to greater than 200 km/s with a Mach number above 10. Such high velocity dense plasma jets have a number of potential fusion applications, including plasma refueling, magnetized target fusion, injection of angular momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, high energy density plasmas, and others. The approach uses symmetric injection of high density plasma into a coaxial electromagnetic accelerator having an annular gap geometry tailored to prevent formation of the blow-by instability. The injected plasma is generated by numerous (currently 32) radially oriented capillary discharges arranged uniformly around the circumference of the angled annular injection region of the accelerator. Magnetohydrodynamic modeling identified electrode profiles that can achieve the desired plasma jet parameters. The experimental hardware is described along with initial experimental results in which approximately 200 microg has been accelerated to 100 km/s in a half-scale prototype gun. Initial observations of 64 merging injector jets in a planar cylindrical testing array are presented. Density and velocity are presently limited by available peak current and injection sources. Steps to increase both the drive current and the injected plasma mass are described for next generation experiments.
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Rosid radiation and the rapid rise of angiosperm-dominated forests.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 02-17-2009
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The rosid clade (70,000 species) contains more than one-fourth of all angiosperm species and includes most lineages of extant temperate and tropical forest trees. Despite progress in elucidating relationships within the angiosperms, rosids remain the largest poorly resolved major clade; deep relationships within the rosids are particularly enigmatic. Based on parsimony and maximum likelihood (ML) analyses of separate and combined 12-gene (10 plastid genes, 2 nuclear; >18,000 bp) and plastid inverted repeat (IR; 24 genes and intervening spacers; >25,000 bp) datasets for >100 rosid species, we provide a greatly improved understanding of rosid phylogeny. Vitaceae are sister to all other rosids, which in turn form 2 large clades, each with a ML bootstrap value of 100%: (i) eurosids I (Fabidae) include the nitrogen-fixing clade, Celastrales, Huaceae, Zygophyllales, Malpighiales, and Oxalidales; and (ii) eurosids II (Malvidae) include Tapisciaceae, Brassicales, Malvales, Sapindales, Geraniales, Myrtales, Crossosomatales, and Picramniaceae. The rosid clade diversified rapidly into these major lineages, possibly over a period of <15 million years, and perhaps in as little as 4 to 5 million years. The timing of the inferred rapid radiation of rosids [108 to 91 million years ago (Mya) and 107-83 Mya for Fabidae and Malvidae, respectively] corresponds with the rapid rise of angiosperm-dominated forests and the concomitant diversification of other clades that inhabit these forests, including amphibians, ants, placental mammals, and ferns.
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Floral variation and floral genetics in basal angiosperms.
Am. J. Bot.
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2009
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Recent advances in phylogeny reconstruction and floral genetics set the stage for new investigations of the origin and diversification of the flower. We review the current state of angiosperm phylogeny, with an emphasis on basal lineages. With the surprising inclusion of Hydatellaceae with Nymphaeales, recent studies support the topology of Amborella sister to all other extant angiosperms, with Nymphaeales and then Austrobaileyales as subsequent sisters to all remaining angiosperms. Notable modifications from most recent analyses are the sister relationships of Chloranthaceae with the magnoliids and of Ceratophyllaceae with eudicots. We review "trends" in floral morphology and contrast historical, intuitive interpretations with explicit character-state reconstructions using molecular-based trees, focusing on (1) the size, number, and organization of floral organs; (2) the evolution of the perianth; (3) floral symmetry; and (4) floral synorganization. We provide summaries of those genes known to affect floral features that contribute to much of floral diversity. Although most floral genes have not been investigated outside of a few model systems, sufficient information is emerging to identify candidate genes for testing specific hypotheses in nonmodel plants. We conclude with a set of evo-devo case studies in which floral genetics have been linked to variation in floral morphology.
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Evolutionary analysis of the MIXTA gene family highlights potential targets for the study of cellular differentiation.
Mol. Biol. Evol.
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Differentiated epidermal cells such as trichomes and conical cells perform numerous essential functions in plant biology and are important for our understanding of developmental patterning and cell shape regulation. Many are also commercially significant, such as cotton fibers and trichomes that secrete pharmaceutically useful or herbivore-deterring compounds. Here, we focus on the phylogeny and evolution of the subgroup 9 R2R3 MYB gene transcription factors, which include the MIXTA gene, and that are important for the specification and regulation of plant cellular differentiation. We have sequenced 49 subgroup 9 R2R3 MYB genes from key experimental taxa and combined these sequences with those identified by an exhaustive bioinformatic search, to compile a data set of 223 subgroup 9 R2R3 MYB genes. Our phylogenetic analyses demonstrate, for the first time, the complex evolutionary history of the subgroup 9 R2R3 MYB genes. A duplication event is inferred before the origin of seed plants giving rise to two major gene lineages, here termed SBG9-A and SBG9-B. The evolutionary conservation of the SBG9-B gene lineage has not been previously recognized and its role in cellular differentiation is unknown, thus an entire clade of potential candidate genes for epidermal cell regulation remains to be explored. Using a heterologous transformation bioassay, we provide functional data that implicate members of the SBG9-B lineage in the specification of epidermal projections. Furthermore, we reveal numerous putative duplication events in both SBG9-A and SBG9-B lineages, resolving uncertainty about orthology and paralogy among the subgroup 9 R2R3 MYB genes. Finally, we provide a robust framework over which to interpret existing functional data and to direct ongoing comparative genetic research into the evolution of plant cellular diversity.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.