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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Outcome of lower-intensity allogeneic transplantation in non-Hodgkin lymphoma after autologous transplantation failure.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2011
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We studied the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation after lower-intensity conditioning regimens (reduced-intensity conditioning and nonmyeloablative) in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma who relapsed after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Nonrelapse mortality, lymphoma progression/relapse, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival were analyzed in 263 patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. All 263 patients had relapsed after a previous autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and then had undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from a related (n = 26) or unrelated (n = 237) donor after reduced-intensity conditioning (n = 128) or nonmyeloablative (n = 135) and were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 1996 and 2006. The median follow-up of survivors was 68 months (range, 3-111 months). Three-year nonrelapse mortality was 44% (95% confidence interval [CI], 37%-50%). Lymphoma progression/relapse at 3 years was 35% (95% CI, 29%-41%). Three-year probabilities of PFS and overall survival were 21% (95% CI, 16%-27%) and 32% (95% CI, 27%-38%), respectively. Superior Karnofsky Performance Score, longer interval between transplantations, total body irradiation-based conditioning regimen, and lymphoma remission at transplantation were correlated with improved PFS. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation after lower-intensity conditioning is associated with significant nonrelapse mortality but can result in long-term PFS. We describe a quantitative risk model based on pretransplantation risk factors to identify those patients likely to benefit from this approach.
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Molecular monitoring of imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia patients in complete cytogenetic remission: does achievement of a stable major molecular response at any time point identify a privileged group of patients? A multicenter experience in Argentina
Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2011
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Monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD) by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients is mandatory in the era of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Achieving a major molecular response (MMR) at 12 and 18 months predicts a better progression and event-free survival.
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Outcome of patients with IgD and IgM multiple myeloma undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a retrospective CIBMTR study.
Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk
PUBLISHED: 12-16-2010
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Immunoglobulin D (IgD) and IgM multiple myeloma represent uncommon immunoglobulin isotypes, accounting for 2% and 0.5% of cases, respectively. Limited information is available regarding the prognosis of these isotypes, but they have been considered to have a more aggressive course than the more common immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA isotypes. In particular, the outcome after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HCT) has not been well defined.
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Risk-adapted therapy with three or six cycles of doxorubicin/bleomycin/vinblastine/dacarbazine plus involved-field radiation therapy in Hodgkin lymphoma, based on prognosis at diagnosis and early response: results from the GATLA study.
Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2010
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Doxorubicin/bleomycin/vinblastine/dacarbazine (ABVD) plus involved-field radiation therapy (IFRT) is the gold-standard treatment for early and advanced stages of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). We evaluated the outcomes of patients according to prognosis at diagnosis and over time to determine who achieved complete remission (CR).
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Oligoclonal bands and immunoglobulin isotype switch during monitoring of patients with multiple myeloma and autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation: a 16-year experience.
Clin. Chem. Lab. Med.
PUBLISHED: 05-11-2010
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Over the last 20 years, high dose therapy followed by hemopoietic stem cell transplantation has been employed in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). During 16 years of follow-up, the degree of tumor response and survival in 238 patients with autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and changes in the serum protein electrophoretic pattern were analyzed.
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Imatinib mesylate pharmacokinetics before and after sleeve gastrectomy in a morbidly obese patient with chronic myeloid leukemia.
Pharmacotherapy
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2009
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Abstract Imatinib is widely used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The agent, administered orally, has approximately 98% oral bioavailability, achieves maximum plasma concentration approximately 2-4 hours after ingestion, and has a plasma half-life of approximately 18 hours. As maintaining an adequate plasma imatinib concentration is essential to achieving a favorable therapeutic response, it is important to determine whether gastrointestinal surgery, pathologic conditions, or anatomic changes negatively affect imatinib absorption, and thereby result in subtherapeutic plasma imatinib concentrations. We describe a 36-year-old, morbidly obese woman with chronic myeloid leukemia who received treatment with alpha-interferon and cytarabine over 5 years. Her chemotherapy was then switched to imatinib 400 mg/day because she failed to achieve a molecular response with the other two agents. A complete molecular response was achieved with imatinib. Four years later, she underwent a sleeve gastrectomy while receiving imatinib. Imatinib plasma pharmacokinetic values were assessed before and on four occasions during the year after the sleeve gastrectomy. The patients trough plasma concentration before surgery (1558 ng/ml) was consistent with those found in the literature (>/= 1000 ng/ml), whereas her trough concentrations after surgery were 46-60% lower (629-836 ng/ml) than the preoperative value. Despite this, the patient remained in complete molecular remission for 1 year after surgery. Monitoring plasma imatinib concentrations is recommended in morbidly obese patients with chronic myeloid leukemia or gastrointestinal stromal tumors who undergo gastric procedures. Additional pharmacokinetic studies, however, are needed in these patients.
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Utilization study of filgrastim (Neutromax) during autologous haematopoietic precursor transplantation for myeloma and lymphoma patients.
Transfus. Apher. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 08-20-2009
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To describe utilization of a biosimilar product containing filgrastim (Neutromax), data of 414 myeloma or lymphoma patients subjected to autologous SCT between 1998 and 2007 were analyzed. Filgrastim was used for mobilization of progenitors (5 days at 300 microg/day) and for the recovery of neutropenia after transplantation (100 microg/day, since day +5). In 2003, the excipient mannitol was replaced by sorbitol. A mean dose of 9.47 x 10(6)CD34(+)cells/kg was infused; 100 neutrophils/mm(3) required 5-day treatment; 500 neutrophils/mm(3), 6 days and 1000 neutrophils/mm(3), 7 days. Neutromax effect in SCT is similar to reports with other brands. No difference was found between formulations.
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A comparison of HLA-identical sibling allogeneic versus autologous transplantation for diffuse large B cell lymphoma: a report from the CIBMTR.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 06-29-2009
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We compared outcomes of 916 diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients aged >or=18 years undergoing first autologous (n = 837) or myeloablative (MA) allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) (n = 79) between 1995 and 2003 reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR). Median follow-up was 81 months for allogeneic HCT versus 60 months for autologous HCT. Allogeneic HCT recipients were more likely to have high-risk disease features including higher stage, more prior chemotherapy regimens, and resistant disease. Allogeneic HCT was associated with a higher 1 year treatment-related mortality (TRM) (relative risk [RR] 4.88, 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.21-7.40, P < .001), treatment failure (RR 2.06, 95% CI, 1.54-2.75, P < .001), and mortality (RR 2.75, 95% CI, 2.03-3.72, P < .001). Risk of disease progression was similar in the 2 groups (RR 1.12, 95% CI, 0.73-1.72, P = .59). In fact, for 1-year survivors, no significant differences were observed for TRM, progression, progression-free (PFS) or overall survival (OS). Increased risks of TRM and mortality were associated with older age (>50 years), lower performance score, chemoresistance, and earlier year of transplant. In a cohort of mainly high-risk DLBCL patients, upfront MA allogeneic HCT, although associated with increased early mortality, was associated with a similar risk of disease progression compared to lower risk patients receiving autologous HCT.
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Serum free light chains and oligoclonal bands in patients with multiple myeloma and autologous stem cell transplantation.
Clin. Chem. Lab. Med.
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To establish stringent complete remission (SCR) in patients with multiple myeloma (MM), it is currently recommended to obtain a normal serum free light chains (sFLC) ratio. The appearance of serum oligoclonal bands (OB) after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is considered a favorable prognostic factor. The objective of this study was to examine sFLC for assessing SCR in patients with MM, and ASCT with OB. We also examined how capillary electrophoresis (CE) compares with agarose gel electrophoresis (Aga) in identifying oligoclonal bands.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.