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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Opportunities and challenges for the use of large-scale surveys in public health research: A comparison of the assessment of cancer screening behaviors.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 10-11-2014
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Large-scale surveys that assess cancer prevention and control behaviors are a readily-available, rich resource for public health researchers. Although these data are used by a subset of researchers who are familiar with them, their potential is not fully realized by the research community for reasons including lack of awareness of the data, and limited understanding of their content, methodology, and utility. Until now, no comprehensive resource existed to describe and facilitate use of these data. To address this gap and maximize use of these data, we catalogued the characteristics and content of four surveys that assessed cancer screening behaviors in 2005, the most recent year with concurrent periods of data collection: the National Health Interview Survey, Health Information National Trends Survey, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, and California Health Interview Survey. We documented each survey's characteristics, measures of cancer screening, and relevant correlates; examined how published studies (n=78) have used the surveys' cancer screening data; and reviewed new cancer screening constructs measured in recent years. This information can guide researchers in deciding how to capitalize on the opportunities presented by these data resources.
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National evidence on the use of shared decision making in prostate-specific antigen screening.
Ann Fam Med
PUBLISHED: 07-10-2013
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Recent clinical practice guidelines on prostate cancer screening using the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test (PSA screening) have recommended that clinicians practice shared decision making-a process involving clinician-patient discussion of the pros, cons, and uncertainties of screening. We undertook a study to determine the prevalence of shared decision making in both PSA screening and nonscreening, as well as patient characteristics associated with shared decision making.
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Sources of uncertainty and their association with medical decision making: exploring mechanisms in Fanconi anemia.
Ann Behav Med
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2013
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Effects of different sources of medical uncertainty on peoples health-related cognitions, emotions, and decision making have yet to be systematically examined.
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Grid-enabled measures: using Science 2.0 to standardize measures and share data.
Am J Prev Med
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2011
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Scientists are taking advantage of the Internet and collaborative web technology to accelerate discovery in a massively connected, participative environment--a phenomenon referred to by some as Science 2.0. As a new way of doing science, this phenomenon has the potential to push science forward in a more efficient manner than was previously possible. The Grid-Enabled Measures (GEM) database has been conceptualized as an instantiation of Science 2.0 principles by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) with two overarching goals: (1) promote the use of standardized measures, which are tied to theoretically based constructs; and (2) facilitate the ability to share harmonized data resulting from the use of standardized measures. The first is accomplished by creating an online venue where a virtual community of researchers can collaborate together and come to consensus on measures by rating, commenting on, and viewing meta-data about the measures and associated constructs. The second is accomplished by connecting the constructs and measures to an ontological framework with data standards and common data elements such as the NCI Enterprise Vocabulary System (EVS) and the cancer Data Standards Repository (caDSR). This paper will describe the web 2.0 principles on which the GEM database is based, describe its functionality, and discuss some of the important issues involved with creating the GEM database such as the role of mutually agreed-on ontologies (i.e., knowledge categories and the relationships among these categories--for data sharing).
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Physicians colorectal cancer screening discussion and recommendation patterns.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2011
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Primary care physician (PCP) actions are pivotal to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening performance, and guidelines recommend discussion with patients about test options and potential benefits and harms. This article profiles patterns of discussion about and recommendations for screening and explores potential associations with multilevel factors (patient, clinician, practice, and environment).
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Knowledge and intention to participate in cervical cancer screening after the human papillomavirus vaccine.
Vaccine
PUBLISHED: 01-04-2011
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If women who receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine are unduly reassured about the cancer prevention benefits of vaccination, they may choose not to participate in screening, thereby increasing their risk for cervical cancer. This study assesses adult womens knowledge of the need to continue cervical cancer screening after HPV vaccination, describes Pap test intentions of vaccinated young adult women, and evaluates whether knowledge and intentions differ across groups at greatest risk for cervical cancer.
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Cervical cancer screening with both human papillomavirus and Papanicolaou testing vs Papanicolaou testing alone: what screening intervals are physicians recommending?
Arch. Intern. Med.
PUBLISHED: 06-16-2010
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Guidelines recommend screening for cervical cancer among women 30 years or older 3 years after a normal Papanicolaou test (hereinafter referred to as Pap test) result or a combined normal screening result (normal Pap/negative human papillomavirus [HPV] test results). We assessed reported recommendations by US primary care physicians (PCPs) on screening intervals that incorporate HPV cotesting compared with Pap testing alone.
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Effects of socioeconomic status and health care access on low levels of human papillomavirus vaccination among Spanish-speaking Hispanics in California.
Am J Public Health
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Little is known about the effect of language preference, socioeconomic status, and health care access on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. We examined these factors in Hispanic parents of daughters aged 11 to 17 years in California (n = 1090). Spanish-speaking parents were less likely to have their daughters vaccinated than were English speakers (odds ratio [OR] = 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.31, 0.98). Adding income and access to multivariate analyses made language nonsignificant (OR = 0.68; 95% CI = 0.35, 1.29). This confirms that health care use is associated with language via income and access. Low-income Hispanics, who lack access, need information about free HPV vaccination programs.
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Human papillomavirus vaccine knowledge and hypothetical acceptance among women in Appalachia Ohio.
Vaccine
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To assess hypothetical acceptance of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for themselves and a daughter age 9-12 years among Appalachia Ohio women.
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Screening colonoscopy in the US: attitudes and practices of primary care physicians.
J Gen Intern Med
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Rising colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates in the last decade are attributable almost entirely to increased colonoscopy use. Little is known about factors driving the increase, but primary care physicians (PCPs) play a central role in CRC screening delivery.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.