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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Physical activity and screen time in metabolically healthy obese phenotypes in adolescents and adults.
J Obes
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2013
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The purpose of this study was to examine levels of physical activity (PA) and screen time (ST) in metabolically healthy obese (MHO) and metabolically unhealthy obese (MUO) adolescents and adults.
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Association of metabolic risk with longitudinal physical activity and fitness: coronary artery risk development in young adults (CARDIA).
Metab Syndr Relat Disord
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2013
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Despite established relationships between physical activity (PA) or physical fitness (fitness) and metabolic risk, the prospective association is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine whether metabolic risk in young adults is associated with 20-year PA or fitness trajectories.
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Sitting and cardiometabolic risk factors in u.s. Adolescents.
J Allied Health
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2013
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To examine sitting time and cardiometabolic disease risk in US adolescents.
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The influence of body mass index on long-term fitness from physical education in adolescent girls.
J Sch Health
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2011
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Physical education (PE) can improve physical fitness; however, little research has evaluated PEs long-term influence. The purpose is to determine PEs longitudinal effects on fitness in a group of adolescent girls and to determine whether body mass index (BMI) status influenced any potential effects.
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Accelerometer-determined lifestyle activities in US adults.
J Phys Act Health
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2011
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Objective physical activity data analyses focus on moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) without considering lower intensity lifestyle-type activities (LA). We describe 1) quantity of LA (minutes and steps per day) across demographic groups, 2) proportion of LA to total physical activity, and 3) relationships between LA and MVPA using NHANES 2005-2006 accelerometer adult data (n = 3744).
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Patterns of adult stepping cadence in the 2005-2006 NHANES.
Prev Med
PUBLISHED: 02-09-2011
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Laboratory studies of adult walking behavior have consistently found that a cadence of 100 steps/min is a reasonable threshold for moderate intensity. The purpose of this study was to determine cadence patterns in free-living adults, and in particular, time spent at increasing cadence increments including 100 steps/min and beyond.
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Prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factor clustering and body mass index in adolescents.
J. Pediatr.
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2011
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To establish prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factor clustering within US adolescent body mass index (BMI) groups.
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Accelerometer-determined moderate intensity lifestyle activity and cardiometabolic health.
Prev Med
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2011
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Objective To assess the relationship between moderate intensity lifestyle activity (LA) and cardiometabolic health using accelerometer data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2005-2006.
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Subclinical atherosclerosis and metabolic risk: role of body mass index and waist circumference.
Metab Syndr Relat Disord
PUBLISHED: 12-06-2010
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Carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) is greater in adults with elevated metabolic risk profiles. However, the influence of body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference (WC) on the relationship between IMT and metabolic risk is unclear.
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The relationship of waist circumference and BMI to visceral, subcutaneous, and total body fat: sex and race differences.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 10-14-2010
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The purpose of this study was to examine sex and race differences in the relationship between anthropometric measurements and adiposity in white and African-American (AA) adults. Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) areas were measured with computed tomography (CT). Fat mass (FM) was measured with dual-energy-X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Correlation coefficients were used to assess the relationship of waist circumference (WC) and BMI to VAT, SAT, and FM within sex-by-race groups. General linear models were used to compare relationships between WC or BMI, and adiposity across sex and race, within age groups (18-39 and 40-64 years). The sample included 1,667 adults (men: 489 white; 120 AA; women: 666 white, 392 AA). WC and BMI correlations were highest for FM and SAT compared to VAT. Women had higher FM levels than men regardless of WC, but the sex difference in FM was attenuated in younger AA adults with a high BMI. For a given level of WC or BMI, women had higher levels of SAT than men; however, significant interactions indicated that the relationship was not consistent across all levels of BMI and WC. Sex and race differences in VAT varied significantly with WC and BMI. In general, white adults had higher levels of VAT than AA adults at higher levels of BMI and WC. Sex differences, and in some instances race differences, in the relationships between anthropometry and fat-specific depots demonstrate that these characteristics need to be considered when predicting adiposity from WC or BMI.
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Predicting adult body mass index-specific metabolic risk from childhood.
Metab Syndr Relat Disord
PUBLISHED: 02-17-2010
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Metabolic risk varies within adult body mass index (BMI) categories; however, the development of BMI-specific metabolic risk from childhood is unknown.
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Accelerometer-determined steps/day and metabolic syndrome.
Am J Prev Med
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2010
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There is a lack of knowledge about the relationship between objectively measured physical activity and the odds of having metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors.
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Leisure time sedentary behavior, occupational/domestic physical activity, and metabolic syndrome in U.S. men and women.
Metab Syndr Relat Disord
PUBLISHED: 11-11-2009
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This study examines leisure time sedentary behavior (LTSB) and usual occupational/domestic activity (UODA) and their relationship with metabolic syndrome and individual cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, independent of physical activity level.
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Metabolic syndrome and changes in body fat from a low-fat diet and/or exercise randomized controlled trial.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2009
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It is difficult to identify the successful component(s) related to changes in metabolic syndrome (MetS) from lifestyle interventions: the weight loss, the behavior change, or the combination. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of a weight-stable randomized controlled trial of low-fat diet and exercise, alone and in combination, on MetS. Men (n = 179) and postmenopausal women (n = 149) with elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were randomized into a 1-year, weight-stable trial with four treatment groups: control (C), diet (D), exercise (E), or diet plus exercise (D+E). MetS was defined using a continuous score. Changes in MetS score (DeltaMetS) were compared between groups using analysis of covariance, stratified by gender and using two models, with and without baseline and change in percent body fat (DeltaBF) as a covariate. In men, DeltaMetS was higher for D vs. C (P = 0.04), D+E vs. C (P = 0.0002), and D+E vs. E (P = 0.02). For women, DeltaMetS was greater for D vs. C (P = 0.045), E vs. C (P = 0.02), and D+E vs. C (P = 0.004). After adjusting for DeltaBF, all differences between groups were attenuated and no longer significant. DeltaMetS were associated with DeltaBF for both men (P < 0.0001) and women (P = 0.004). After adjustment for DeltaBF, low-fat diet alone and in combination with exercise had no effect on MetS. The key component for MetS from low-fat diet and/or increased physical activity appears to be body fat loss.
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Changes in C-reactive protein from low-fat diet and/or physical activity in men and women with and without metabolic syndrome.
Metab. Clin. Exp.
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2009
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Change in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) from low-fat diet (diet) and physical activity (PA) interventions is relatively unknown for adults with metabolic syndrome. The objective of the study was to assess CRP change (DeltaCRP) with diet and/or PA in men and women with and without metabolic syndrome. Men (n = 149) and postmenopausal women (n = 125) with elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were recruited into a 1-year randomized controlled trial. Treatment groups were as follows: control, diet (reduced total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol intake), PA (45-60 minutes at 60%-85% maximum heart rate), or diet + PA. Weight loss was not an intervention focus. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute criteria. Stored plasma samples were analyzed for CRP. Change in CRP was compared between treatments, within sex and metabolic syndrome status, using analysis of covariance, including covariates for baseline CRP and body fat change. For women with metabolic syndrome (n = 39), DeltaCRP was greater in diet vs control (-1.2 +/- 0.4, P = .009), diet + PA vs control (-1.3 +/- 0.4, P = .006), and diet + PA vs PA (-1.1 +/- 0.4, P = .02). Women with metabolic syndrome receiving the diet component (diet or diet + PA) had greater DeltaCRP compared with those who did not (control or PA) (P = .001). Change in CRP was not significantly different between intervention groups in men overall, women overall, men with (n = 47) or without metabolic syndrome (n = 102), or women without metabolic syndrome (n = 86). Low-fat diet may be the most effective treatment for reducing CRP in women with metabolic syndrome.
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Total and femoral neck bone mineral density and physical activity in a sample of men and women.
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab
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Physical activity (PA), total body fat (TBF), and lean body mass (LBM) are associated with bone mineral density (BMD). However, the independent influence of PA on BMD, while controlling for body composition is not understood as well and is the purpose of the current study. Whole-body BMD (g·cm?²), femoral neck BMD (g·cm?²), TBF (kg), and LBM (kg) were measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. PA levels (total, work, sport, non-sport) were estimated using the Baecke questionnaire. General linear models determined the independent effects of PA on BMD (whole-body and femoral neck), with adjustment for age, sex, ethnicity, smoking, menopausal status (as appropriate), LBM, and TBF. These associations were also examined by sex and age group (20-34, 35-49, and 50-64 years). The sample included 802 adults (65% women; 13% African American) from the Pennington Center Longitudinal Study that were 20 to 64 years of age (mean ± SD: 46.9 ± 11.0 years). Higher sports scores were associated with higher femoral neck BMD in the total group, men and women, and in 20- to 34-year-olds and 35- to 49-year-olds, but not significant in those 50-64 years of age. Similar significant associations were found for sports score with total body BMD; however, this relationship was not significant for women or for those 50-64 years of age. Total PA had inconsistent relationships with both femoral neck BMD and total body BMD. Higher levels of sport-related PA are associated with higher femoral neck BMD; however, these relationships vary by PA domain and site of BMD measurement.
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A catalog of rules, variables, and definitions applied to accelerometer data in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2003-2006.
Prev Chronic Dis
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The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) included accelerometry in the 2003-2006 data collection cycles. Researchers have used these data since their release in 2007, but the data have not been consistently treated, examined, or reported. The objective of this study was to aggregate data from studies using NHANES accelerometry data and to catalogue study decision rules, derived variables, and cut point definitions to facilitate a more uniform approach to these data.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.