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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Mechanism of Hb?-35-induced an increase in the activation of the human immune system by endotoxins.
Innate Immun
PUBLISHED: 07-19-2014
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Endotoxins (LPS) are highly potent immune stimulatory molecules and are mainly known for triggering Gram-negative sepsis. However, besides their toxic effects, this stimulatory function may be advantageous, for example when used as an adjuvant during vaccination. Thus, there is always a narrow range between the useful wake-up of the immune system and its overwhelming reaction, which can lead to diseases like sepsis. This raises the question of which conformational properties are responsible for making the LPS aggregates more or less potent. As described previously, the size, type and form of LPS aggregates play a major role in their immune stimulatory activity. In this study we investigate the role of these parameters. On the one hand, we use a peptide (Pep19-2.5; Aspidasept) that causes a change of the LPS aggregate structure into a less toxic state; on the other hand, we use a potent immune stimulating peptide (Hb?-35), leading to higher toxicity. We have found opposing effects on LPS aggregate conformations allowing a better understanding of the processes of immune stimulation.
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Biophysical analysis of the interaction of the serum protein human ?2GPI with bacterial lipopolysaccharide.
FEBS Open Bio
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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There are several human serum proteins for which no clear role is yet known. Among these is the abundant serum protein beta2-glycoprotein-I (?2GPI), which is known to bind to negatively charged phospholipids as well as to bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and was therefore proposed to play a role in the immune response. To understand the details of these interactions, a biophysical analysis of the binding of ?2GPI to LPS and phosphatidylserine (PS) was performed. The data indicate only a moderate tendency of the protein (1) to influence the LPS-induced cytokine production in vitro, (2) to react exothermally with LPS in a non-saturable way, and (3) to change its local microenvironment upon LPS association. Additionally, we found that the protein binds more strongly to phosphatidylserine (PS) than to LPS. Furthermore, ?2GPI converts the LPS bilayer aggregates into a stronger multilamellar form, and reduces the fluidity of the hydrocarbon moiety of LPS due to a rigidification of the acyl chains. From these data it can be concluded that ?2GPI plays a role as an immune-modulating agent, but there is much less evidence for a role in immune defense against bacterial toxins such as LPS.
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Autonomous cure of damaged human intestinal epithelial cells by TLR2 and TLR4-dependent production of IL-22 in response to Spirulina polysaccharides.
Int. Immunopharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 08-07-2013
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In order to analyze the damage of human epithelial cells, we used human quasi-normal FPCK-1-1 cells derived from a colonic polyp in a patient with familial adenomatous polyposis as a monolayer, which is co-cultured with peptidoglycan (PGN)-stimulated THP-1 cells. Co-cultured FPCK-1-1 cells showed a decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and the lower level of claudin-2. When Spirulina complex polysaccharides were added one day before the start of the co-culture, there was no decrease of TER and claudin-2 (early phase damage). In contrast, when Spirulina complex polysaccharides were added to FPCK-1-1 cells after the level of TER had decreased, there was no recovery at the level of claudin-2, though the TER level recovered (late phase damage). The mucosa reconstitution is suggested to be involved in the recovery from the damaged status. Interestingly, autonomous recovery of FPCK-1-1 cells from both the early and late phase damage requires the production of IL-22, because anti-IL-22 antibodies inhibited recovery in these cases. Antibodies against either TLR2 or TLR4 inhibited the production of IL-22 from FPCK-1-1 colon epithelial cells, suggesting that signals through TLR2 and TLR4 are necessary for autonomous recovery of FPCK-1-1 colon epithelial cells by producing IL-22. In conclusion, we have established a useful model for the study of intestinal damage and recovery using human colon epithelial cells and our data suggest that damage to human colon epithelial cells can, at least in part, be recovered by the autonomous production of IL-22 in response to Spirulina complex polysaccharides.
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Direct conversion of silver complexes to nanoscale hexagonal columns on a copper alloy for plasmonic applications.
Phys Chem Chem Phys
PUBLISHED: 08-02-2013
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We introduced a novel method for the rapid synthesis of silver nanohexagonal thin columns from an aqueous mixture of sodium thiosulfate (Na2S2O3) and silver chloride (AgCl) simply added to a phosphor bronze substrate. The reaction is based on galvanic displacement and the products are potentially useful for plasmonic applications.
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Regulatory effects of Spirulina complex polysaccharides on growth of murine RSV-M glioma cells through Toll-like receptor 4.
Microbiol. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 07-05-2013
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This study is the first to report that Spirulina complex polysaccharides (CPS) suppress glioma growth by down-regulating angiogenesis via a Toll-like receptor 4 signal. Murine RSV-M glioma cells were implanted s.c. into C3H/HeN mice and TLR4 mutant C3H/HeJ mice. Treatment with either Spirulina CPS or Escherichia coli (E. coli) lipopolysaccharides (LPS) strongly suppressed RSV-M glioma cell growth in C3H/HeN, but not C3H/HeJ, mice. Glioma cells stimulated production of interleukin (IL)-17 in both C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ tumor-bearing mice. Treatment with E. coli LPS induced much greater IL-17 production in tumor-bearing C3H/HeN mice than in tumor-bearing C3H/HeJ mice. In C3H/HeN mice, treatment with Spirulina CPS suppressed growth of re-transplanted glioma; however, treatment with E. coli LPS did not, suggesting that Spirulina CPS enhance the immune response. Administration of anti-cluster of differentiation (CD)8, anti-CD4, anti-CD8 antibodies, and anti-asialo GM1 antibodies enhanced tumor growth, suggesting that T cells and natural killer cells or macrophages are involved in suppression of tumor growth by Spirulina CPS. Although anti-interferon-? antibodies had no effect on glioma cell growth, anti-IL-17 antibodies administered four days after tumor transplantation suppressed growth similarly to treatment with Spirulina CPS. Less angiogenesis was observed in gliomas from Spirulina CPS-treated mice than in those from saline- or E. coli LPS-treated mice. These findings suggest that, in C3H/HeN mice, Spirulina CPS antagonize glioma cell growth by down-regulating angiogenesis, and that this down-regulation is mediated in part by regulating IL-17 production.
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Biophysical investigations into the interactions of endotoxins with bile acids.
Innate Immun
PUBLISHED: 09-27-2011
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The interaction of selected endotoxin preparations (lipid A from Erwinia carotovora and LPS Re and Ra from Salmonella enterica sv. Minnesota strains R595 and R60, respectively) with selected bile acids was investigated biophysically. Endotoxin aggregates were analyzed for their gel-to-liquid crystalline phase behavior, the type of their aggregates, the conformation of particular functional groups, and their Zeta potential in the absence and presence of the bile acids by applying Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, measurements of the electrophoretic mobility, and synchrotron radiation X-ray scattering. In addition, the ability of the endotoxins to induce cytokines in human mononuclear cells was tested in the absence and presence of varying concentrations of bile acids. The data show that the endotoxin:bile acid interaction is not governed by Coulomb forces, rather a hydrophobic interaction takes place. This leads to an enhanced formation of the inherent cubic aggregate structures of the endotoxins, concomitant with a slight disaggregation, as evidenced by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. Parallel to this, the addition of bile acids increased the bioactivity of lipid A and, to a lower degree, also that of the tested rough mutant LPS at lower concentrations of the endotoxin preparation, a finding similar as reported for the interaction of other agents such as hemoglobin. These data imply that there are general mechanisms that govern the expression of biological activities of endotoxins.
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Molecular basis for endotoxin neutralization by amphipathic peptides derived from the alpha-helical cationic core-region of NK-lysin.
Biophys. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2010
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An analysis of the interaction of the NK-lysin derived peptide NK-2 and of analogs thereof with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) was performed to determine the most important biophysical parameters for an effective LPS neutralization. We used microcalorimetry, FTIR spectroscopy, Zeta potential measurements, and small-angle X-ray scattering to analyze the peptide:LPS binding enthalpy, the accessible LPS surface charge, the fluidity of the LPS hydrocarbon chains, their phase transition enthalpy change, the aggregate structure of LPS, and how these parameters are modulated by the peptides. We conclude that (i) a high peptide:LPS binding affinity, which is facilitated by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions and which leads to a positive Zeta potential, (ii) the formation of peptide-enriched domains, which destabilize the lipid packing, demonstrated by a drastic decrease of phase transition enthalpy change of LPS, and (iii) the multilamellarization of the LPS aggregate structure are crucial for an effective endotoxin neutralization by cationic peptides.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.