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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Wnt-Fzd signaling sensitizes peripheral sensory neurons via distinct noncanonical pathways.
Neuron
PUBLISHED: 05-19-2014
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Wnt signaling represents a highly versatile signaling system, which plays diverse and critical roles in various aspects of neural development. Sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia require Wnt signaling for initial cell-fate determination as well as patterning and synapse formation. Here we report that Wnt signaling pathways persist in adult sensory neurons and play a functional role in their sensitization in a pathophysiological context. We observed that Wnt3a recruits the Wnt-calcium signaling pathway and the Wnt planar cell polarity pathway in peripheral nerves to alter pain sensitivity in a modality-specific manner and we elucidated underlying mechanisms. In contrast, biochemical, pharmacological, and genetic studies revealed lack of functional relevance for the classical canonical ?-catenin pathway in peripheral sensory neurons in acute modulation of nociception. Finally, this study provides proof-of-concept for a translational potential for Wnt3a-Frizzled3 signaling in alleviating disease-related pain hypersensitivity in cancer-associated pain in vivo.
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Hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors: new players in tumor-nerve interactions.
J. Mol. Med.
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2010
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A variety of cancers are accompanied by debilitating pain, which constitutes the primary reason for poor quality of life in cancer patients. There is an urgent demand for the development of specific mechanism-based therapies against cancer pain. Recently, important advances have been made in mechanisms contributing to cancer pain. A notable finding was that the tumor-derived hematopoietic growth factors, granulocyte- and granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF/GM-CSF), subserve important functions in the generation of pain hypersensitivity in tumor-affected regions. In this context, their receptors were unexpectedly found on pain-sensing nerves and were observed to be functionally linked to nociceptive sensitization and tumor-induced pain. Here, we review evidence supporting a role for G-/GM-CSF in sensitization of pain-sensing nerves, the underlying signaling pathways and the cross-talk with other pronociceptive cytokines, peptides and modulators derived from immune cells, osteoclasts and tumor cells. These findings hold implications in the therapy of pain in disease states, such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis.
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An improved behavioural assay demonstrates that ultrasound vocalizations constitute a reliable indicator of chronic cancer pain and neuropathic pain.
Mol Pain
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2010
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On-going pain is one of the most debilitating symptoms associated with a variety of chronic pain disorders. An understanding of mechanisms underlying on-going pain, i.e. stimulus-independent pain has been hampered so far by a lack of behavioural parameters which enable studying it in experimental animals. Ultrasound vocalizations (USVs) have been proposed to correlate with pain evoked by an acute activation of nociceptors. However, literature on the utility of USVs as an indicator of chronic pain is very controversial. A majority of these inconsistencies arise from parameters confounding behavioural experiments, which include novelty, fear and stress due to restrain, amongst others.
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Dissecting the functional significance of endothelin A receptors in peripheral nociceptors in vivo via conditional gene deletion.
Pain
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2009
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The peptide endothelin-1 (ET1), which was originally identified as a vasoconstrictor, has emerged as a critical regulator of a number of painful conditions, including inflammatory pain and tumor-associated pain. There is considerable pharmacological evidence supporting a role for endothelin A receptors (ET(A)) in mediating ET1-induced pro-algesic functions. ET(A) receptors are expressed in small-diameter nociceptive neurons, but also found in a variety of other cell types in peripheral tissues, including immune cells, keratinocytes, endothelial cells, which have the potential to modulate nociception. To elucidate the functional contribution of ET(A) receptors expressed in sensory neurons towards the functions of the ET1 axis in pathological pain states, we undertook a conditional gene deletion approach to selectively deplete expression of ET(A) in sensory nerves, preserving expression in non-neural peripheral tissues; the expression of ET(B) remained unchanged. Behavioural and pharmacological experiments showed that only late nociceptive hypersensitivity caused by ET1 is abrogated upon a loss of ET(A) receptors on nociceptors and further suggest that ET1-induced early nociceptive hypersensitivity involves activation of ET(A) as well as ET(B) receptors in non-neural peripheral cells. Furthermore, in the context of alleviation of cancer pain and chronic inflammatory pain by ET(A) receptor antagonists, we observed in corresponding mouse models that the contribution of ET(A) receptors expressed in nociceptors is most significant. These results help understand the role of ET(A) receptors in complex biological processes and peripheral cell-cell interactions involved in inflammatory and tumor-associated pain.
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Hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors mediate tumor-nerve interactions and bone cancer pain.
Nat. Med.
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2009
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Pain is one of the most severe and debilitating symptoms associated with several forms of cancer. Various types of carcinomas and sarcomas metastasize to skeletal bones and cause spontaneous bone pain and hyperalgesia, which is accompanied by bone degradation and remodeling of peripheral nerves. Despite recent advances, the molecular mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of cancer-evoked pain are not well understood. Several types of non-hematopoietic tumors secrete hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors that act on myeloid cells and tumor cells. Here we report that receptors and signaling mediators of granulocyte- and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF and GM-CSF) are also functionally expressed on sensory nerves. GM-CSF sensitized nerves to mechanical stimuli in vitro and in vivo, potentiated CGRP release and caused sprouting of sensory nerve endings in the skin. Interruption of G-CSF and GM-CSF signaling in vivo led to reduced tumor growth and nerve remodeling, and abrogated bone cancer pain. The key significance of GM-CSF signaling in sensory neurons was revealed by an attenuation of tumor-evoked pain following a sensory nerve-specific knockdown of GM-CSF receptors. These results show that G-CSF and GM-CSF are important in tumor-nerve interactions and suggest that their receptors on primary afferent nerve fibers constitute potential therapeutic targets in cancer pain.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.