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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Salvaging recurrent scleral buckle exposure with autologous periosteal patch graft.
Retin Cases Brief Rep
PUBLISHED: 11-06-2014
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To describe a surgical technique for salvaging recurrent exposure of scleral buckle.
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Verapamil Increases the Bactericidal Activity of Bedaquiline Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the Mouse Model.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 10-22-2014
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Bedaquiline is a newly approved drug for multidrug resistant tuberculosis with concerns about its safety in humans. We found that co-administration of verapamil with sub-inhibitory doses of bedaquiline gave the same bactericidal effect in mice as full human-bioequivalent bedaquiline dosing. Adding verapamil to bedaquiline monotherapy also protected from development of resistant mutants in vivo. Adjunctive use of verapamil may permit use of lower doses of bedaquiline and thereby reduce its dose-related toxicities in tuberculosis patients.
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MTHFR C677T predisposes to POAG but not to PACG in a North Indian population: a case control study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Hyperhomocysteinemia induced by the C677T genetic variant in MTHFR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) has been implicated in neuronal cell death of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), which is a characteristic feature of glaucoma. However, association of MTHFR C677T with glaucoma has been controversial because of inconsistent results across association studies. Association between MTHFR C677T and glaucoma has not been reported in Indian population. Therefore, with a focus on neurodegenerative death of RGC in glaucoma, the current study aimed to investigate association of MTHFR C677T with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) and Primary Angle Closure Glaucoma (PACG) in a North Indian population. A total of 404 participants (231 patients and 173 controls) were included in this study. Genotyping was performed by Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism. A few random samples were also tested by direct sequencing. Genotypic and allelic distributions of the POAG and PACG cohorts were compared to that of controls by chi-square test and odds ratios were reported with 95% confidence intervals. Genotypic and allelic distributions between POAG cases and controls were significantly different (p?=?0.03 and p?=?0.01 respectively). Unlike POAG, we did not find significant difference in the genotypic and allelic distributions of C677T between PACG cases and controls (p>0.05). We also observed a higher proportion of TT associated POAG in females than that in males. However, this is a preliminary indication of gender specific risk of C677T that needs to be replicated in a larger cohort of males and females. The present investigation on MTHFR C677T and glaucoma reveals that the TT genotype and T allele of this polymorphism are significant risk factors for POAG but not for PACG in North Indian population. Ours is the first report demonstrating association of MTHFR C677T with POAG but not PACG in individuals from North India.
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Aerosol Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection causes rapid loss of diversity in gut microbiota.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an important human pathogen, and yet diagnosis remains challenging. Little research has focused on the impact of M. tuberculosis on the gut microbiota, despite the significant immunological and homeostatic functions of the gastrointestinal tract. To determine the effect of M. tuberculosis infection on the gut microbiota, we followed mice from M. tuberculosis aerosol infection until death, using 16S rRNA sequencing. We saw a rapid change in the gut microbiota in response to infection, with all mice showing a loss and then recovery of microbial community diversity, and found that pre-infection samples clustered separately from post-infection samples, using ecological beta-diversity measures. The effect on the fecal microbiota was observed as rapidly as six days following lung infection. Analysis of additional mice infected by a different M. tuberculosis strain corroborated these results, together demonstrating that the mouse gut microbiota significantly changes with M. tuberculosis infection.
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Efflux Inhibition with Verapamil Potentiates Bedaquiline in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 10-14-2013
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Drug efflux is an important resistance mechanism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We found that verapamil, an efflux inhibitor, profoundly decreases the MIC of bedaquiline and clofazimine to M. tuberculosis by 8- to 16-fold. This exquisite susceptibility was noted among drug-susceptible and drug-resistant clinical isolates. Thus, efflux inhibition is an important sensitizer of bedaquiline and clofazimine, and efflux may emerge as a resistance mechanism to these drugs.
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Acceleration of tuberculosis treatment by adjunctive therapy with verapamil as an efflux inhibitor.
Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med.
PUBLISHED: 06-29-2013
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A major priority in tuberculosis (TB) is to reduce effective treatment times and emergence of resistance. Recent studies in macrophages and zebrafish show that inhibition of mycobacterial efflux pumps with verapamil reduces the bacterial drug tolerance and may enhance drug efficacy.
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Imaging dynamics of CD11c? cells and Foxp3? cells in progressive autoimmune insulitis in the NOD mouse model of type 1 diabetes.
Diabetologia
PUBLISHED: 04-24-2013
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The aim of this study was to visualise the dynamics and interactions of the cells involved in autoimmune-driven inflammation in type 1 diabetes.
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Global and 3D spatial assessment of neuroinflammation in rodent models of Multiple Sclerosis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a progressive autoimmune inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). T cells play a key role in the progression of neuroinflammation in MS and also in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) animal models for the disease. A technology for quantitative and 3 dimensional (3D) spatial assessment of inflammation in this and other CNS inflammatory conditions is much needed. Here we present a procedure for 3D spatial assessment and global quantification of the development of neuroinflammation based on Optical Projection Tomography (OPT). Applying this approach to the analysis of rodent models of MS, we provide global quantitative data of the major inflammatory component as a function of the clinical course. Our data demonstrates a strong correlation between the development and progression of neuroinflammation and clinical disease in several mouse and a rat model of MS refining the information regarding the spatial dynamics of the inflammatory component in EAE. This method provides a powerful tool to investigate the effect of environmental and genetic forces and for assessing the therapeutic effects of drug therapy in animal models of MS and other neuroinflammatory/neurodegenerative disorders.
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A young female patient of neuromyelitis optica presenting with hypocalcemic tetany.
J Assoc Physicians India
PUBLISHED: 07-21-2011
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Neuromyelitis optica, a variant of multiple sclerosis, presenting with hypocalcemic tetany is an unusual presentation. We report here a case of 25 years old female who was a case of neuromyelitis optica and had hypocalcemic tetany as the initial presentation among others. The case is interesting in that the hypocalcemic tetany was not coincidental. The patient had low vitamin D status and probably, this was correlated etiologically to neuromyelitis optica. Vitamin D has immunomodulatory effect and low vitamin D status has been implicated in the etiology of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel disease.
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Suppressors of cytokine signaling inhibit effector T cell responses during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.
Immunol. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2011
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Protective immune responses during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infection are regulated at multiple levels and critically dependent on the balance in the secretion of pro-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines. A key factor that governs this balance at the cellular level is suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS). We recently demonstrated that toll-like receptor 2 and dendritic cell (DC)-SIGNR1 differentially regulate SOCS1 expression in DCs during M. tuberculosis infection. This consecutively regulated IL-12 production and determined M. tuberculosis survival. In this study, we characterized the role of SOCS1 in regulating effector responses from CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells during M. tuberculosis infection. Our data indicate that T cells from M. tuberculosis-infected mice show increased and differential association of SOCS1 with CD3 and CD28, when compared with uninfected mice. While SOCS1 displays increased association with CD3 than CD28 in CD4(+) T cells; SOCS1 is associated more with CD28 than CD3 in CD8(+) T cells. Further, SOCS1 shows increased association with IL-12 and IL-2 receptors in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from infected mice when compared with naive mice. Silencing SOCS1 in T cells increased signal transduction from T cell receptor (TCR) and CD28 with enhanced activation of key signaling molecules and proliferation. Significantly, SOCS1-silenced T cells mediated enhanced clearance of M. tuberculosis inside macrophages. Finally, adoptive transfer of SOCS1-silenced T cells in M. tuberculosis-infected mice mediated significant reduction in M. tuberculosis loads in spleen. These results exemplify the negative role played by SOCS1 during T cell priming and effector functions during M. tuberculosis infection.
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Characterization of structural features controlling the receptiveness of empty class II MHC molecules.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2011
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MHC class II molecules (MHC II) play a pivotal role in the cell-surface presentation of antigens for surveillance by T cells. Antigen loading takes place inside the cell in endosomal compartments and loss of the peptide ligand rapidly leads to the formation of a non-receptive state of the MHC molecule. Non-receptiveness hinders the efficient loading of new antigens onto the empty MHC II. However, the mechanisms driving the formation of the peptide inaccessible state are not well understood. Here, a combined approach of experimental site-directed mutagenesis and computational modeling is used to reveal structural features underlying "non-receptiveness." Molecular dynamics simulations of the human MHC II HLA-DR1 suggest a straightening of the ?-helix of the ?1 domain during the transition from the open to the non-receptive state. The movement is mostly confined to a hinge region conserved in all known MHC molecules. This shift causes a narrowing of the two helices flanking the binding site and results in a closure, which is further stabilized by the formation of a critical hydrogen bond between residues ?Q9 and ?N82. Mutagenesis experiments confirmed that replacement of either one of the two residues by alanine renders the protein highly susceptible. Notably, loading enhancement was also observed when the mutated MHC II molecules were expressed on the surface of fibroblast cells. Altogether, structural features underlying the non-receptive state of empty HLA-DR1 identified by theoretical means and experiments revealed highly conserved residues critically involved in the receptiveness of MHC II. The atomic details of rearrangements of the peptide-binding groove upon peptide loss provide insight into structure and dynamics of empty MHC II molecules and may foster rational approaches to interfere with non-receptiveness. Manipulation of peptide loading efficiency for improved peptide vaccination strategies could be one of the applications profiting from the structural knowledge provided by this study.
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Beta-cell specific deletion of Dicer1 leads to defective insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2011
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Mature microRNAs (miRNAs), derived through cleavage of pre-miRNAs by the Dicer1 enzyme, regulate protein expression in many cell-types including cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. To investigate the importance of miRNAs in mouse insulin secreting ?-cells, we have generated mice with a ?-cells specific disruption of the Dicer1 gene using the Cre-lox system controlled by the rat insulin promoter (RIP). In contrast to their normoglycaemic control littermates (RIP-Cre(+/-) Dicer1(?/wt)), RIP-Cre(+/-)Dicer1(flox/flox) mice (RIP-Cre Dicer1(?/?)) developed progressive hyperglycaemia and full-blown diabetes mellitus in adulthood that recapitulated the natural history of the spontaneous disease in mice. Reduced insulin gene expression and concomitant reduced insulin secretion preceded the hyperglycaemic state and diabetes development. Immunohistochemical, flow cytometric and ultrastructural analyses revealed altered islet morphology, marked decreased ?-cell mass, reduced numbers of granules within the ?-cells and reduced granule docking in adult RIP-Cre Dicer1(?/?) mice. ?-cell specific Dicer1 deletion did not appear to disrupt fetal and neonatal ?-cell development as 2-week old RIP-Cre Dicer1(?/?) mice showed ultrastructurally normal ?-cells and intact insulin secretion. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that a ?-cell specific disruption of the miRNAs network, although allowing for apparently normal ?-cell development, leads to progressive impairment of insulin secretion, glucose homeostasis and diabetes development.
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Identification of host-dependent survival factors for intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis through an siRNA screen.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 03-03-2010
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The stable infection of host macrophages by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) involves, and depends on, the attenuation of the diverse microbicidal responses mounted by the host cell. This is primarily achieved through targeted perturbations of the host cellular signaling machinery. Therefore, in view of the dependency of the pathogen on host molecules for its intracellular survival, we wanted to test whether targeting such factors could provide an alternate route for the therapeutic management of tuberculosis. To first identify components of the host signaling machinery that regulate intracellular survival of Mtb, we performed an siRNA screen against all known kinases and phosphatases in murine macrophages infected with the virulent strain, H37Rv. Several validated targets could be identified by this method where silencing led either to a significant decrease, or enhancement in the intracellular mycobacterial load. To further resolve the functional relevance of these targets, we also screened against these identified targets in cells infected with different strains of multiple drug-resistant mycobacteria which differed in terms of their intracellular growth properties. The results obtained subsequently allowed us to filter the core set of host regulatory molecules that functioned independently of the phenotypic variations exhibited by the pathogen. Then, using a combination of both in vitro and in vivo experimentation, we could demonstrate that at least some of these host factors provide attractive targets for anti-TB drug development. These results provide a "proof-of-concept" demonstration that targeting host factors subverted by intracellular Mtb provides an attractive and feasible strategy for the development of anti-tuberculosis drugs. Importantly, our findings also emphasize the advantage of such an approach by establishing its equal applicability to infections with Mtb strains exhibiting a range of phenotypic diversifications, including multiple drug-resistance. Thus the host factors identified here may potentially be exploited for the development of anti-tuberculosis drugs.
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Pharmacological profile of AW-814141, a novel, potent, selective and orally active inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase.
Int. Immunopharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2010
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The p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) is a key signaling molecule that plays a crucial role in the progression of various inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of a p38 MAPK inhibitor, AW-814141. AW-814141 inhibited enzymatic activity of recombinant p38-alpha and beta isoforms with IC(50) value of 100nM and 158nM, respectively. AW-814141 also inhibited the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with an IC(50) value of 212nM and demonstrated selectivity against a panel of few kinases. Oral administration of AW-814141 (10mpk) in LPS-injected mice resulted in a significant reduction in TNF-alpha production in the circulation. In a carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model and collagen-induced arthritis model (CIA), AW-814141 dose dependently inhibited paw swelling. In different in vivo efficacy models, efficacy of AW-814141 was found to be better as compared to the reference compounds (Vx-745 and BIRB-796). This study demonstrated that AW-814141 is a novel p38 MAPK inhibitor and it displays promising in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory activities and can be used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
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Toll-like receptor 2 and DC-SIGNR1 differentially regulate suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 in dendritic cells during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2009
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A hallmark of protective immunity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection is the regulated secretion of pro-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines. Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) are key regulators of cytokine secretion and function. In this study we investigated regulation of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3 grabbing non-integrin receptor 1 (DC-SIGNR1)-mediated SOCS1 expression in DCs during M. tb infection. We show that, compared with TLR2, stimulating DC-SIGNR1 on DCs induces higher SOCS1 expression and lower interleukin-12 production. Co-stimulating DC-SIGNR1 and TLR2 differentially regulates SOCS1 expression depending on the relative concentration of their ligands. Stimulating DC-SIGNR1 with M. tb infection increases SOCS1 expression, while stimulating TLR2 with M. tb infection reduces SOCS1 expression. Knockdown of SOCS1 in DCs by siRNA enhances interleukin-12 transcription and protein expression upon DC-SIGNR1 stimulation. Raf-1 and Syk differentially regulate TLR2- and DC-SIGNR1-mediated SOCS1 expression. In addition, DC-SIGNR1 shows greater association with SOCS1 when compared with TLR2. Interestingly, compared with healthy asymptomatic individuals, peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with active tuberculosis disease showed higher expression of SOCS1, which was reduced following chemotherapy. Similarly, stimulating DC-SIGNR1 on DCs from M. tb-infected TLR2(-/-) mice enhanced SOCS1 expression that was reduced following chemotherapy. Further, knockdown of SOCS1 in mouse DCs or human peripheral blood mononuclear cells resulted in increased killing of virulent M. tb. These results indicate that TLR2 and DC-SIGNR1 differentially regulate SOCS1 expression during M. tb infection. This in turn regulates M. tb survival by governing key cytokine expression.
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Proteome analysis of Plasmodium falciparum extracellular secretory antigens at asexual blood stages reveals a cohort of proteins with possible roles in immune modulation and signaling.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2009
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The highly co-evolved relationship of parasites and their hosts appears to include modulation of host immune signals, although the molecular mechanisms involved in the host-parasite interplay remain poorly understood. Characterization of these key genes and their cognate proteins related to the host-parasite interplay should lead to a better understanding of this intriguing biological phenomenon. The malaria agent Plasmodium falciparum is predicted to export a cohort of several hundred proteins to remodel the host erythrocyte. However, proteins actively exported by the asexual intracellular parasite beyond the host red blood cell membrane (before merozoite egress) have been poorly investigated so far. Here we used two complementary methodologies, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis/MS and LC-MS/MS, to examine the extracellular secreted antigens at asexual blood stages of P. falciparum. We identified 27 novel antigens exported by P. falciparum in the culture medium of which some showed clustering with highly polymorphic genes on chromosomes, suggesting that they may encode putative antigenic determinants of the parasite. Immunolocalization of four novel secreted proteins confirmed their export beyond the infected red blood cell membrane. Of these, preliminary functional characterization of two novel (Sel1 repeat-containing) parasite proteins, PfSEL1 and PfSEL2 revealed that they down-regulate expression of cell surface Notch signaling molecules in host cells. Also a novel protein kinase (PfEK) and a novel protein phosphatase (PfEP) were found to, respectively, phosphorylate/dephosphorylate parasite-specific proteins in the extracellular culture supernatant. Our study thus sheds new light on malaria parasite extracellular secreted antigens of which some may be essential for parasite development and could constitute promising new drug targets.
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Development of cell death-based method for the selectivity screening of caspase-1 inhibitors.
Cytotechnology
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2009
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Caspase-1 selective inhibitors are novel therapeutic agents for inflammatory diseases. Selectivity assays for caspases can be initiated with purified enzyme, making these assays very costly and time consuming. Therefore, there is a need to develop a fast and reliable cell-based assay, which can be used for the selectivity screening of multiple caspases in a biologically relevant context in a single assay. In this study, we have developed an assay in which DNA fragmentation, a hallmark of apoptosis, of Jurkat cell line was examined post induction with etoposide in the presence or absence of inhibitors of caspases 1, 3, 8, 9 and pan-caspase inhibitors. We observed that caspases-3, -8, -9 and pan caspase inhibitors resulted in significant inhibition of etoposide-induced DNA fragmentation. However, caspase-1 specific inhibitor failed to prevent DNA fragmentation, suggesting that either caspases belonging to caspase-1 family (1, 4 and 5) are not present in the Jurkat cells or might not be involved in the etoposide-induced DNA fragmentation. Since the inhibition of caspases 3, 8 and 9 is accompanied by the down regulation of the activity of a cascade of caspases (caspases 2, 6, 7, 9 and 10), selectivity of caspase-I inhibitors can be ascertained for the above panel (caspases 2, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10) of caspases from this single assay.
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Voltage gated calcium channels negatively regulate protective immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2009
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Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulates levels and activity of key intracellular second messengers to evade protective immune responses. Calcium release from voltage gated calcium channels (VGCC) regulates immune responses to pathogens. In this study, we investigated the roles of VGCC in regulating protective immunity to mycobacteria in vitro and in vivo. Inhibiting L-type or R-type VGCC in dendritic cells (DCs) either using antibodies or by siRNA increased calcium influx in an inositol 1,4,5-phosphate and calcium release calcium activated channel dependent mechanism that resulted in increased expression of genes favoring pro-inflammatory responses. Further, VGCC-blocked DCs activated T cells that in turn mediated killing of M. tuberculosis inside macrophages. Likewise, inhibiting VGCC in infected macrophages and PBMCs induced calcium influx, upregulated the expression of pro-inflammatory genes and resulted in enhanced killing of intracellular M. tuberculosis. Importantly, compared to healthy controls, PBMCs of tuberculosis patients expressed higher levels of both VGCC, which were significantly reduced following chemotherapy. Finally, blocking VGCC in vivo in M. tuberculosis infected mice using specific antibodies increased intracellular calcium and significantly reduced bacterial loads. These results indicate that L-type and R-type VGCC play a negative role in M. tuberculosis infection by regulating calcium mobilization in cells that determine protective immunity.
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CD4(+) type II NKT cells mediate ICOS and programmed death-1-dependent regulation of type 1 diabetes.
J. Immunol.
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Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease that results from T cell-mediated destruction of pancreatic ? cells. CD1d-restricted NKT lymphocytes have the ability to regulate immunity, including autoimmunity. We previously demonstrated that CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells, which carry diverse TCRs, prevented T1D in the NOD mouse model for the human disease. In this study, we show that CD4(+) 24?? type II NKT cells, but not CD4/CD8 double-negative NKT cells, were sufficient to downregulate diabetogenic CD4(+) BDC2.5 NOD T cells in adoptive transfer experiments. CD4(+) 24?? NKT cells exhibited a memory phenotype including high ICOS expression, increased cytokine production, and limited display of NK cell markers, compared with double-negative 24?? NKT cells. Blocking of ICOS or the programmed death-1/programmed death ligand 1 pathway was shown to abolish the regulation that occurred in the pancreas draining lymph nodes. To our knowledge, these results provide for the first time cellular and molecular information on how type II CD1d-restricted NKT cells regulate T1D.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.