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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Acute flaccid paralysis with anterior myelitis - california, june 2012-june 2014.
MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.
PUBLISHED: 10-10-2014
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In August 2012, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) was contacted by a San Francisco Bay area clinician who requested poliovirus testing for an unvaccinated man aged 29 years with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) associated with anterior myelitis (i.e., evidence of inflammation of the spinal cord involving the grey matter including anterior horn cell bodies) and no history of international travel during the month before symptom onset. Within 2 weeks, CDPH had received reports of two additional cases of AFP with anterior myelitis of unknown etiology. Testing at CDPH's Viral and Rickettsial Disease Laboratory for stool, nasopharyngeal swab, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) did not detect the presence of an enterovirus (EV), the genus of the family Picornaviridae that includes poliovirus. Additional laboratory testing for infectious diseases conducted at the CDPH Viral and Rickettsial Disease Laboratory did not identify a causative agent to explain the observed clinical syndrome reported among the patients. To identify other cases of AFP with anterior myelitis and elucidate possible common etiologies, CDPH posted alerts in official communications for California local health departments during December 2012, July 2013, and February 2014. Reports of cases of neurologic illness received by CDPH were investigated throughout this period, and clinicians were encouraged to submit clinical samples for testing. A total of 23 cases of AFP with anterior myelitis of unknown etiology were identified. Epidemiologic and laboratory investigation did not identify poliovirus infection as a possible cause for the observed cases. No common etiology was identified to explain the reported cases, although EV-D68 was identified in upper respiratory tract specimens of two patients. EV infection, including poliovirus infection, should be considered in the differential diagnosis in cases of AFP with anterior myelitis and testing performed per CDC guidelines.
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A novel adenovirus species associated with an acute respiratory outbreak in a baboon colony and evidence of coincident human infection.
MBio
PUBLISHED: 04-18-2013
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Adenoviruses (AdVs) are DNA viruses that infect many vertebrate hosts, including humans and nonhuman primates. Here we identify a novel AdV species, provisionally named "simian adenovirus C (SAdV-C)," associated with a 1997 outbreak of acute respiratory illness in captive baboons (4 of 9) at a primate research facility in Texas. None of the six AdVs recovered from baboons (BaAdVs) during the outbreak, including the two baboons who died from pneumonia, were typeable. Since clinical samples from the two fatal cases were not available, whole-genome sequencing of nasal isolates from one sick baboon and three asymptomatic baboons during the outbreak was performed. Three AdVs were members of species SAdV-C (BaAdV-2 and BaAdV-4 were genetically identical, and BaAdV-3), while one (BaAdV-1) was a member of the recently described SAdV-B species. BaAdV-3 was the only AdV among the 4 isolated from a sick baboon, and thus was deemed to be the cause of the outbreak. Significant divergence (<58% amino acid identity) was found in one of the fiber proteins of BaAdV-3 relative to BaAdV-2 and -4, suggesting that BaAdV-3 may be a rare SAdV-C recombinant. Neutralizing antibodies to the other 3 AdVs, but not BaAdV-3, were detected in healthy baboons from 1996 to 2003 and staff personnel from 1997. These results implicate a novel adenovirus species (SAdV-C) in an acute respiratory outbreak in a baboon colony and underscore the potential for cross-species transmission of AdVs between humans and nonhuman primates. IMPORTANCE Adenoviruses (AdVs) are DNA viruses that infect many animals, including humans and monkeys. In 1997, an outbreak of acute respiratory illness from AdVs occurred in a baboon colony in Texas. Here we use whole-genome sequencing and antibody testing to investigate new AdVs in baboons (BaAdVs) during the outbreak, one of which, BaAdV-3, came from a sick animal. By sequence analysis, BaAdV-3 may be a recombinant strain that arose from a related BaAdV found in baboons nearby in the colony (who were not sick) and yet another unknown AdV. We also found antibodies to these new BaAdVs in baboons and staff personnel at the facility. Taken together, our findings of a new AdV species as the cause of an acute respiratory outbreak in a baboon colony underscore the ongoing threat from emerging viruses that may carry the potential for cross-species transmission between monkeys and humans.
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Experimental cross-species infection of common marmosets by titi monkey adenovirus.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Adenoviruses are DNA viruses that infect a number of vertebrate hosts and are associated with both sporadic and epidemic disease in humans. We previously identified a novel adenovirus, titi monkey adenovirus (TMAdV), as the cause of a fulminant pneumonia outbreak in a colony of titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus) at a national primate center in 2009. Serological evidence of infection by TMAdV was also found in a human researcher at the facility and household family member, raising concerns for potential cross-species transmission of the virus. Here we present experimental evidence of cross-species TMAdV infection in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). Nasal inoculation of a cell cultured-adapted TMAdV strain into three marmosets produced an acute, mild respiratory illness characterized by low-grade fever, reduced activity, anorexia, and sneezing. An increase in virus-specific neutralization antibody titers accompanied the development of clinical signs. Although serially collected nasal swabs were positive for TMAdV for at least 8 days, all 3 infected marmosets spontaneously recovered by day 12 post-inoculation, and persistence of the virus in tissues could not be established. Thus, the pathogenesis of experimental inoculation of TMAdV in common marmosets resembled the mild, self-limiting respiratory infection typically seen in immunocompetent human hosts rather than the rapidly progressive, fatal pneumonia observed in 19 of 23 titi monkeys during the prior 2009 outbreak. These findings further establish the potential for adenovirus cross-species transmission and provide the basis for development of a monkey model useful for assessing the zoonotic potential of adenoviruses.
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HB-EGF and PDGF mediate reciprocal interactions of carcinoma cells with cancer-associated fibroblasts to support progression of uterine cervical cancers.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-18-2011
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Tumor stroma drives the growth and progression of cancers. A heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor, HB-EGF, is an EGF receptor ligand that stimulates cell growth in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. While elevated expression of HB-EGF in cancer cells and its contribution to tumor progression are well documented, the effects of HB-EGF expression in the tumor stroma have not been clarified. Here, we show that HB-EGF is expressed in stromal fibroblasts where it promotes cancer cell proliferation. In uterine cervical cancers, HB-EGF was detected immunohistochemically in the stroma proximal to the cancer epithelium. Proliferation of cervical cancer cells in vitro was enhanced by coculture with fibroblasts isolated from tumor tissues of patients with cervical cancer. Inhibition of HB-EGF function or treatment with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) inhibitors abrogated cancer cell growth enhanced by cervical cancer-associated fibroblast (CCF) coculture. Furthermore, tumor formation in a mouse xenograft model was enhanced by cotransplantation of CCF or mouse embryonic fibroblasts, but not with embryonic fibroblasts from HB-EGF-deficient mice. Conversely, conditioned medium from cancer cells induced HB-EGF expression in CCF. Mechanistic investigations established that PDGF was the primary factor responsible. Together, our findings indicate that HB-EGF and PDGF reciprocally mediate the interaction of cancer cells with cancer-associated fibroblasts, promoting cancer cell proliferation in a paracrine manner that has implications for novel combinatorial cancer therapies.
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Cross-species transmission of a novel adenovirus associated with a fulminant pneumonia outbreak in a new world monkey colony.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2011
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Adenoviruses are DNA viruses that naturally infect many vertebrates, including humans and monkeys, and cause a wide range of clinical illnesses in humans. Infection from individual strains has conventionally been thought to be species-specific. Here we applied the Virochip, a pan-viral microarray, to identify a novel adenovirus (TMAdV, titi monkey adenovirus) as the cause of a deadly outbreak in a closed colony of New World monkeys (titi monkeys; Callicebus cupreus) at the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC). Among 65 titi monkeys housed in a building, 23 (34%) developed upper respiratory symptoms that progressed to fulminant pneumonia and hepatitis, and 19 of 23 monkeys, or 83% of those infected, died or were humanely euthanized. Whole-genome sequencing of TMAdV revealed that this adenovirus is a new species and highly divergent, sharing <57% pairwise nucleotide identity with other adenoviruses. Cultivation of TMAdV was successful in a human A549 lung adenocarcinoma cell line, but not in primary or established monkey kidney cells. At the onset of the outbreak, the researcher in closest contact with the monkeys developed an acute respiratory illness, with symptoms persisting for 4 weeks, and had a convalescent serum sample seropositive for TMAdV. A clinically ill family member, despite having no contact with the CNPRC, also tested positive, and screening of a set of 81 random adult blood donors from the Western United States detected TMAdV-specific neutralizing antibodies in 2 individuals (2/81, or 2.5%). These findings raise the possibility of zoonotic infection by TMAdV and human-to-human transmission of the virus in the population. Given the unusually high case fatality rate from the outbreak (83%), it is unlikely that titi monkeys are the native host species for TMAdV, and the natural reservoir of the virus is still unknown. The discovery of TMAdV, a novel adenovirus with the capacity to infect both monkeys and humans, suggests that adenoviruses should be monitored closely as potential causes of cross-species outbreaks.
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Quantitative real-time PCR for rhinovirus, and its use in determining the relationship between TCID50 and the number of viral particles.
J. Virol. Methods
PUBLISHED: 08-02-2010
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The development of a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for human rhinovirus serotype 16 (HRV16) is described using the plasmid pR16.11, which contains the full-length genome of HRV16. A standard curve was generated by plotting the critical threshold (C(t)) against numbers of plasmid. The limit of sensitivity was less than10 cDNA copies, and the curve showed a high degree of linearity over a range of 10(1) to 10(6) cDNA copies with r(2)?0.9989. Amplification efficiency of the qPCR was greater than 97.6 percent. The standard curve was highly reproducible with low intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation. Standard curves were also generated from cDNA derived from two viral suspensions of known TCID(50), and were exactly parallel to those generated from the plasmid. Comparison of the curves generated from the plasmid or viral cDNA showed that for the two suspensions, TCID(50) corresponded to either 142 or 2088 viral particles. This new qPCR will permit quantitative assessments of interactions between virus and epithelium such as determinations of the affinity and number of viral binding sites or of the number of virus produced per infected cell.
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High antimetastatic efficacy of MEN4901/T-0128, a novel camptothecin carboxymethyldextran conjugate.
J. Surg. Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2010
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The antimetastatic activity of a novel camptothecan conjugate, MEN4901/T-0128, in which 7-ethyl-10-aminopropyloxy-camptothecin (T-2513) is bound to a biodegradable carboxymethyldextran via a Gly-Gly-Gly linker, was observed in this study. High antimetastatic activity of MEN4901/T-0128 was demonstrated in a clinically-relevant orthotopic mouse model of human colon cancer. MEN4901/T-0128 and irinotecan were compared for anti-metastatic activity as well as efficacy against the primary tumor. An imageable, metastatic model was made by surgical orthotopic implantation (SOI) of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing HT-29 tumor in nude mice. MEN4901/T-0128 and irinotecan were administered intravenously at various doses and schedules. MEN4901/T-0128, with treatment beginning on d 49 after SOI, was highly effective on lymph node metastasis as well as against the primary tumor. Both GFP imaging and histology demonstrated a markedly lower metastatic incidence of lymph nodes in all MEN4901/T-0128 treated mice compared with irinotecan-treated and untreated mice. At the most efficacious dose of MEN4901/T-0128, only 1 of 12 animals had lymph node metastasis compared with 19 of 20 in the control group. The present study demonstrates the principle that when a camptothecan is conjugated to an appropriate polymer, the drug can become extremely effective with important clinical potential for antimetastatic therapy, a most urgent need.
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Rhinovirus associated with severe lower respiratory tract infections in children.
Pediatr. Infect. Dis. J.
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2009
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Rhinovirus is a respiratory virus most typically associated with the common cold and asthma exacerbations, and has not traditionally been considered to play a major role in severe lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). As part of a surveillance program for respiratory pathogens of public health importance, children consecutively admitted to intensive care for LRTI at a large tertiary childrens hospital were tested with polymerase chain reaction for 11 respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae from February 21 to October 31, 2007; 43 cases were enrolled and rhinovirus was the most frequently detected pathogen, with 21 (49%) positive. Rhinovirus cases frequently were young (median age, 1.4 years [range, 44 days-15 years]), hospitalized for pneumonia (10; 48%), had chronic underlying illnesses (15; 71%), had abnormal chest radiographs (18; 86%), required mechanical ventilation (12; 57%), and had prolonged hospitalization (median length, 7 days [range, 1-29 days]). Coinfection with other viruses or bacteria was common (10; 47%). Rhinovirus may be associated with more severe LRTI in children than previously reported, particularly in the noninfluenza, nonrespiratory syncytial virus season.
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In vitro susceptibility to rhinovirus infection is greater for bronchial than for nasal airway epithelial cells in human subjects.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2009
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Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) characteristically cause upper respiratory tract infection, but they also infect the lower airways, causing acute bronchitis and exacerbating asthma.
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Under the radar: balamuthia amebic encephalitis.
Clin. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2009
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We present data from 9 years (1999-2008) of tests for Balamuthia mandrillaris, an agent of amebic encephalitis that were conducted as part of the California Encephalitis Project.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.