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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
A statistical method of identifying interactions in neuron-glia systems based on functional multicell Ca2+ imaging.
PLoS Comput. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2014
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Crosstalk between neurons and glia may constitute a significant part of information processing in the brain. We present a novel method of statistically identifying interactions in a neuron-glia network. We attempted to identify neuron-glia interactions from neuronal and glial activities via maximum-a-posteriori (MAP)-based parameter estimation by developing a generalized linear model (GLM) of a neuron-glia network. The interactions in our interest included functional connectivity and response functions. We evaluated the cross-validated likelihood of GLMs that resulted from the addition or removal of connections to confirm the existence of specific neuron-to-glia or glia-to-neuron connections. We only accepted addition or removal when the modification improved the cross-validated likelihood. We applied the method to a high-throughput, multicellular in vitro Ca2+ imaging dataset obtained from the CA3 region of a rat hippocampus, and then evaluated the reliability of connectivity estimates using a statistical test based on a surrogate method. Our findings based on the estimated connectivity were in good agreement with currently available physiological knowledge, suggesting our method can elucidate undiscovered functions of neuron-glia systems.
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Efficient Monte Carlo Image Analysis for the Location Of Vascular Entity.
IEEE Trans Med Imaging
PUBLISHED: 10-28-2014
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Tubular shaped networks appear not only in medical images like X-ray-, time-of-flight MRI- or CT-angiograms but also in microscopic images of neuronal networks. We present EMILOVE (Efficient Monte-carlo Image-analysis for the Location Of Vascular Entity), a novel modeling algorithm for tubular networks in biomedical images. The model is constructed using tablet shaped particles and edges connecting them. The particles encode the intrinsic information of tubular structure, including position, scale and orientation. The edges connecting the particles determine the topology of the networks. For simulated data, EMILOVE was able to accurately extract the tubular network. EMILOVE showed high performance in real data as well; it successfully modeled vascular networks in real cerebral Xray and time-of-flight MRI angiograms. We also show some promising, preliminary results on microscopic images of neurons.
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A critical time window for dopamine actions on the structural plasticity of dendritic spines.
Science
PUBLISHED: 09-27-2014
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Animal behaviors are reinforced by subsequent rewards following within a narrow time window. Such reward signals are primarily coded by dopamine, which modulates the synaptic connections of medium spiny neurons in the striatum. The mechanisms of the narrow timing detection, however, remain unknown. Here, we optically stimulated dopaminergic and glutamatergic inputs separately and found that dopamine promoted spine enlargement only during a narrow time window (0.3 to 2 seconds) after the glutamatergic inputs. The temporal contingency was detected by rapid regulation of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in thin distal dendrites, in which protein-kinase A was activated only within the time window because of a high phosphodiesterase activity. Thus, we describe a molecular basis of reinforcement plasticity at the level of single dendritic spines.
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Mathematical modeling of neuronal polarization during development.
Prog Mol Biol Transl Sci
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2014
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During development of the brain, morphogenesis of neurons is dynamically organized from a simple rounded shape to a highly polarized morphology consisting of soma, one axon, and dendrites, which is a basis for establishing the unidirectional transfer of electric signals between neurons. The mechanism of such polarization is thought to be "local activation-global inhibition"; however, globally diffusing inhibitor molecules have not been identified. In this chapter, we present a theoretical modeling approach of such neuronal development. We first summarize biological research on neuronal polarization and then develop a biophysical model. Through mathematical analysis, principles of local activation-global inhibition are illustrated based on active transport, protein degradation, and neurite growth, but not on globally diffusing inhibitor.
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In vitro reconstitution of a CaMKII memory switch by an NMDA receptor-derived peptide.
Biophys. J.
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2014
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Ca(2+)/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) has been shown to play a major role in establishing memories through complex molecular interactions including phosphorylation of multiple synaptic targets. However, it is still controversial whether CaMKII itself serves as a molecular memory because of a lack of direct evidence. Here, we show that a single holoenzyme of CaMKII per se serves as an erasable molecular memory switch. We reconstituted Ca(2+)/Calmodulin-dependent CaMKII autophosphorylation in the presence of protein phosphatase 1 in vitro, and found that CaMKII phosphorylation shows a switch-like response with history dependence (hysteresis) only in the presence of an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-derived peptide. This hysteresis is Ca(2+) and protein phosphatase 1 concentration-dependent, indicating that the CaMKII memory switch is not simply caused by an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-derived peptide lock of CaMKII in an active conformation. Mutation of a phosphorylation site of the peptide shifted the Ca(2+) range of hysteresis. These functions may be crucial for induction and maintenance of long-term synaptic plasticity at hippocampal synapses.
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Spiking network simulation code for petascale computers.
Front Neuroinform
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Brain-scale networks exhibit a breathtaking heterogeneity in the dynamical properties and parameters of their constituents. At cellular resolution, the entities of theory are neurons and synapses and over the past decade researchers have learned to manage the heterogeneity of neurons and synapses with efficient data structures. Already early parallel simulation codes stored synapses in a distributed fashion such that a synapse solely consumes memory on the compute node harboring the target neuron. As petaflop computers with some 100,000 nodes become increasingly available for neuroscience, new challenges arise for neuronal network simulation software: Each neuron contacts on the order of 10,000 other neurons and thus has targets only on a fraction of all compute nodes; furthermore, for any given source neuron, at most a single synapse is typically created on any compute node. From the viewpoint of an individual compute node, the heterogeneity in the synaptic target lists thus collapses along two dimensions: the dimension of the types of synapses and the dimension of the number of synapses of a given type. Here we present a data structure taking advantage of this double collapse using metaprogramming techniques. After introducing the relevant scaling scenario for brain-scale simulations, we quantitatively discuss the performance on two supercomputers. We show that the novel architecture scales to the largest petascale supercomputers available today.
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Decoding spatial attention by using cortical currents estimated from electroencephalography with near-infrared spectroscopy prior information.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 12-09-2013
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For practical brain-machine interfaces (BMIs), electroencephalography (EEG) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) are the only current methods that are non-invasive and available in non-laboratory environments. However, the use of EEG and NIRS involves certain inherent problems. EEG signals are generally a mixture of neural activity from broad areas, some of which may not be related to the task targeted by BMI, hence impairing BMI performance. NIRS has an inherent time delay as it measures blood flow, which therefore detracts from practical real-time BMI utility. To try to improve real environment EEG-NIRS-based BMIs, we propose here a novel methodology in which the subjects mental states are decoded from cortical currents estimated from EEG, with the help of information from NIRS. Using a Variational Bayesian Multimodal EncephaloGraphy (VBMEG) methodology, we incorporated a novel form of NIRS-based prior to capture event related desynchronization from isolated current sources on the cortical surface. Then, we applied a Bayesian logistic regression technique to decode subjects mental states from further sparsified current sources. Applying our methodology to a spatial attention task, we found our EEG-NIRS-based decoder exhibited significant performance improvement over decoding methods based on EEG sensor signals alone. The advancement of our methodology, decoding from current sources sparsely isolated on the cortex, was also supported by neuroscientific considerations; intraparietal sulcus, a region known to be involved in spatial attention, was a key responsible region in our task. These results suggest that our methodology is not only a practical option for EEG-NIRS-based BMI applications, but also a potential tool to investigate brain activity in non-laboratory and naturalistic environments.
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High-speed multineuron calcium imaging using Nipkow-type confocal microscopy.
Curr Protoc Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 10-06-2011
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Conventional confocal and two-photon microscopy scan the field of view sequentially with single-point laser illumination. This raster-scanning method constrains video speeds to tens of frames per second, which are too slow to capture the temporal patterns of fast electrical events initiated by neurons. Nipkow-type spinning-disk confocal microscopy resolves this problem by the use of multiple laser beams. We describe experimental procedures for functional multineuron calcium imaging (fMCI) based on Nipkow-disk confocal microscopy, which enables us to monitor the activities of hundreds of neurons en masse at a cellular resolution at up to 2000 fps.
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The period of the somite segmentation clock is sensitive to Notch activity.
Mol. Biol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 07-27-2011
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The number of vertebrae is defined strictly for a given species and depends on the number of somites, which are the earliest metameric structures that form in development. Somites are formed by sequential segmentation. The periodicity of somite segmentation is orchestrated by the synchronous oscillation of gene expression in the presomitic mesoderm (PSM), termed the "somite segmentation clock," in which Notch signaling plays a crucial role. Here we show that the clock period is sensitive to Notch activity, which is fine-tuned by its feedback regulator, Notch-regulated ankyrin repeat protein (Nrarp), and that Nrarp is essential for forming the proper number and morphology of axial skeleton components. Null-mutant mice for Nrarp have fewer vertebrae and have defective morphologies. Notch activity is enhanced in the PSM of the Nrarp(-/-) embryo, where the ~2-h segmentation period is extended by 5 min, thereby forming fewer somites and their resultant vertebrae. Reduced Notch activity partially rescues the Nrarp(-/-) phenotype in the number of somites, but not in morphology. Therefore we propose that the period of the somite segmentation clock is sensitive to Notch activity and that Nrarp plays essential roles in the morphology of vertebrae and ribs.
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Multi-cellular logistics of collective cell migration.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2011
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During development, the formation of biological networks (such as organs and neuronal networks) is controlled by multicellular transportation phenomena based on cell migration. In multi-cellular systems, cellular locomotion is restricted by physical interactions with other cells in a crowded space, similar to passengers pushing others out of their way on a packed train. The motion of individual cells is intrinsically stochastic and may be viewed as a type of random walk. However, this walk takes place in a noisy environment because the cell interacts with its randomly moving neighbors. Despite this randomness and complexity, development is highly orchestrated and precisely regulated, following genetic (and even epigenetic) blueprints. Although individual cell migration has long been studied, the manner in which stochasticity affects multi-cellular transportation within the precisely controlled process of development remains largely unknown. To explore the general principles underlying multicellular migration, we focus on the migration of neural crest cells, which migrate collectively and form streams. We introduce a mechanical model of multi-cellular migration. Simulations based on the model show that the migration mode depends on the relative strengths of the noise from migratory and non-migratory cells. Strong noise from migratory cells and weak noise from surrounding cells causes "collective migration," whereas strong noise from non-migratory cells causes "dispersive migration." Moreover, our theoretical analyses reveal that migratory cells attract each other over long distances, even without direct mechanical contacts. This effective interaction depends on the stochasticity of the migratory and non-migratory cells. On the basis of these findings, we propose that stochastic behavior at the single-cell level works effectively and precisely to achieve collective migration in multi-cellular systems.
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Incremental state aggregation for value function estimation in reinforcement learning.
IEEE Trans Syst Man Cybern B Cybern
PUBLISHED: 05-31-2011
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In reinforcement learning, large state and action spaces make the estimation of value functions impractical, so a value function is often represented as a linear combination of basis functions whose linear coefficients constitute parameters to be estimated. However, preparing basis functions requires a certain amount of prior knowledge and is, in general, a difficult task. To overcome this difficulty, an adaptive basis function construction technique has been proposed by Keller recently, but it requires excessive computational cost. We propose an efficient approach to this difficulty, in which the problem of approximating the value function is decomposed into a number of subproblems, each of which can be solved with small computational cost. Computer experiments show that the CPU time needed by our method is much smaller than that by the existing method.
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Semaphorin 3A induces CaV2.3 channel-dependent conversion of axons to dendrites.
Nat. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 04-06-2011
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Polarized neurites (axons and dendrites) form the functional circuitry of the nervous system. Secreted guidance cues often control the polarity of neuron migration and neurite outgrowth by regulating ion channels. Here, we show that secreted semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) induces the neurite identity of Xenopus spinal commissural interneurons (xSCINs) by activating Ca(V)2.3 channels (Ca(V)2.3). Sema3A treatment converted the identity of axons of cultured xSCINs to that of dendrites by recruiting functional Ca(V)2.3. Inhibition of Sema3A signalling prevented both the expression of Ca(V)2.3 and acquisition of the dendrite identity, and inhibition of Ca(V)2.3 function resulted in multiple axon-like neurites of xSCINs in the spinal cord. Furthermore, Sema3A-triggered cGMP production and PKG activity induced, respectively, the expression of functional Ca(V)2.3 and the dendrite identity. These results reveal a mechanism by which a guidance cue controls the identity of neurites during nervous system development.
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Flexible search for single-axon morphology during neuronal spontaneous polarization.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2011
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Polarization, a disruption of symmetry in cellular morphology, occurs spontaneously, even in symmetrical extracellular conditions. This process is regulated by intracellular chemical reactions and the active transport of proteins and it is accompanied by cellular morphological changes. To elucidate the general principles underlying polarization, we focused on developing neurons. Neuronal polarity is stably established; a neuron initially has several neurites of similar length, but only one elongates and is selected to develop into an axon. Polarization is flexibly controlled; when multiple neurites are selected, the selection is eventually reduced to yield a single axon. What is the system by which morphological information is decoded differently based on the presence of a single or multiple axons? How are stability and flexibility achieved? To answer these questions, we constructed a biophysical model with the active transport of proteins that regulate neurite growth. Our mathematical analysis and computer simulation revealed that, as neurites elongate, transported factors accumulate in the growth cone but are degraded during retrograde diffusion to the soma. Such a system effectively works as local activation-global inhibition mechanism, resulting in both stability and flexibility. Our model shows good accordance with a number of experimental observations.
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A multiphysical model of cell migration integrating reaction-diffusion, membrane and cytoskeleton.
Neural Netw
PUBLISHED: 01-02-2011
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Cellular motility is a complicated phenomenon that involves multiphysics, including the cytoskeleton, the plasma membrane and intracellular signal transduction. In this study, a hybrid computational model was developed for the simulation of whole-cell migration behaviors. The model integrates sub-models of reaction-diffusion, actin filaments (F-actin) and the plasma membrane. Reaction-diffusion was calculated as if enclosed by a moving membrane. Individual F-actins were reorganized on the basis of stochastic kinetic events, such as polymerization, capping, branching and severing. Membrane dynamics were modeled using an optimization of energy function that depends on cell volume, surface area, smoothness and the elasticity of F-actin against the membrane. Simulations of this model demonstrated self-organization of F-actin networks, as in lamellipodia, and chemotactic migration. Furthermore, this method was extended to address external obstacles to simulate the dynamic cellular morphological changes seen during invasive migration.
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Sparse bayesian learning of filters for efficient image expansion.
IEEE Trans Image Process
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2010
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We propose a framework for expanding a given image using an interpolator that is trained in advance with training data, based on sparse bayesian estimation for determining the optimal and compact support for efficient image expansion. Experiments on test data show that learned interpolators are compact yet superior to classical ones.
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A diffusion-based neurite length-sensing mechanism involved in neuronal symmetry breaking.
Mol. Syst. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2010
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Although there has been significant progress in understanding the molecular signals that change cell morphology, mechanisms that cells use to monitor their size and length to regulate their morphology remain elusive. Previous studies suggest that polarizing cultured hippocampal neurons can sense neurite length, identify the longest neurite, and induce its subsequent outgrowth for axonogenesis. We observed that shootin1, a key regulator of axon outgrowth and neuronal polarization, accumulates in neurite tips in a neurite length-dependent manner; here, the property of cell length is translated into shootin1 signals. Quantitative live cell imaging combined with modeling analyses revealed that intraneuritic anterograde transport and retrograde diffusion of shootin1 account for its neurite length-dependent accumulation. Our quantitative model further explains that the length-dependent shootin1 accumulation, together with shootin1-dependent neurite outgrowth, constitutes a positive feedback loop that amplifies stochastic fluctuations of shootin1 signals, thereby generating an asymmetric signal for axon specification and neuronal symmetry breaking.
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Robust model selection for classification of microarrays.
Cancer Inform
PUBLISHED: 06-25-2009
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Recently, microarray-based cancer diagnosis systems have been increasingly investigated. However, cost reduction and reliability assurance of such diagnosis systems are still remaining problems in real clinical scenes. To reduce the cost, we need a supervised classifier involving the smallest number of genes, as long as the classifier is sufficiently reliable. To achieve a reliable classifier, we should assess candidate classifiers and select the best one. In the selection process of the best classifier, however, the assessment criterion must involve large variance because of limited number of samples and non-negligible observation noise. Therefore, even if a classifier with a very small number of genes exhibited the smallest leave-one-out cross-validation (LOO) error rate, it would not necessarily be reliable because classifiers based on a small number of genes tend to show large variance. We propose a robust model selection criterion, the min-max criterion, based on a resampling bootstrap simulation to assess the variance of estimation of classification error rates. We applied our assessment framework to four published real gene expression datasets and one synthetic dataset. We found that a state-of-the-art procedure, weighted voting classifiers with LOO criterion, had a non-negligible risk of selecting extremely poor classifiers and, on the other hand, that the new min-max criterion could eliminate that risk. These finding suggests that our criterion presents a safer procedure to design a practical cancer diagnosis system.
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Boosting perceptual learning by fake feedback.
Vision Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-05-2009
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How does the brain control its sensory plasticity using performance feedback? We examined this question using various types of fake feedback in perceptual learning paradigm. We demonstrated that fake feedback indicating a larger performance improvement facilitated learning compared with genuine feedback. Variance of the fake feedback modulated learning as well, suggesting that feedback uncertainty can be internally evaluated. These results were explained by a computational model which controlled the learning rate of the visual system based on Bayesian estimation of performance gradient incorporating an optimistic bias. Our findings suggest that sensory plasticity might be controlled by high-level cognitive processes.
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Learning a multi-dimensional companding function for lossy source coding.
Neural Netw
PUBLISHED: 05-11-2009
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Although the importance of lossy source coding has been growing, the general and practical methodology for its design has not been completely resolved. The well-known vector quantization (VQ) can represent any fixed-length lossy source coding, but requires too much computation resource. Companding vector quantization (CVQ) can reduce the complexity of non-structured VQ by replacing vector quantization with a set of scalar quantizations and can represent a wide class of practically useful VQs. Although an analytical derivation of optimal CVQ is difficult except for very limited cases, optimization using data samples can be performed instead. Here we propose a CVQ optimization method, which includes bit allocation by a newly derived distortion formula as a generalization of Bennetts formula, and test its validity. We applied the method to transform coding and compared the performance of our CVQ with those of Karhunen-Loƫve transformation (KLT)-based coding and non-structured VQ. As a consequence, we found that our trained CVQ outperforms not only KLT-based coding but also non-structured VQ in the case of high bit-rate coding of linear mixtures of uniform sources. We also found that trained CVQ even outperformed KLT-based coding in the low bit-rate coding of a Gaussian source. To highlight the advantages of our approach, we also discuss the degradation of non-structured VQ and the limitations of theoretical analyses which are valid for high bit-rate coding.
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Optimal aggregation of binary classifiers for multiclass cancer diagnosis using gene expression profiles.
IEEE/ACM Trans Comput Biol Bioinform
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2009
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Multiclass classification is one of the fundamental tasks in bioinformatics and typically arises in cancer diagnosis studies by gene expression profiling. There have been many studies of aggregating binary classifiers to construct a multiclass classifier based on one-versus-the-rest (1R), one-versus-one (11), or other coding strategies, as well as some comparison studies between them. However, the studies found that the best coding depends on each situation. Therefore, a new problem, which we call the "optimal coding problem," has arisen: how can we determine which coding is the optimal one in each situation? To approach this optimal coding problem, we propose a novel framework for constructing a multiclass classifier, in which each binary classifier to be aggregated has a weight value to be optimally tuned based on the observed data. Although there is no a priori answer to the optimal coding problem, our weight tuning method can be a consistent answer to the problem. We apply this method to various classification problems including a synthesized data set and some cancer diagnosis data sets from gene expression profiling. The results demonstrate that, in most situations, our method can improve classification accuracy over simple voting heuristics and is better than or comparable to state-of-the-art multiclass predictors.
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Hierarchical rule switching in prefrontal cortex.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 04-03-2009
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Most real-world decision-making problems involve consideration of numerous possible actions, and it is often impossible to evaluate all of them before settling on preferred strategy. In such situations, humans might explore actions more efficiently by searching only the most likely subspace of the whole action space. To study how the brain solves such action selection problems, we designed a Multi Feature Sorting Task in which the task rules defining an optimal action have a hierarchical structure and studied concurrent brain activity using it. The task consisted of two kinds of rule switches: a higher-order switch to search for a rule across different subspaces and a lower-order switch to change a rule within the same subspace. The results revealed that the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) was more active in the higher-order switching, and the right fronto-polar cortex (FPC) was significantly activated with the lower-order switching. We discuss a possible functional model in the prefrontal cortex where the left DLPFC encodes the hierarchical organization of behaviours and the right FPC maintains and updates multiple behavioural. This interpretation is highly consistent with the previous findings and current theories of hierarchical organization in the prefrontal functional network.
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A multiclass classification method based on decoding of binary classifiers.
Neural Comput
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2009
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In this letter, we present new methods of multiclass classification that combine multiple binary classifiers. Misclassification of each binary classifier is formulated as a bit inversion error with probabilistic models by making an analogy to the context of information transmission theory. Dependence between binary classifiers is incorporated into our model, which makes a decoder a type of Boltzmann machine. We performed experimental studies using a synthetic data set, data sets from the UCI repository, and bioinformatics data sets, and the results show that the proposed methods are superior to the existing multiclass classification methods.
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Using gene expression profiling to identify a prognostic molecular spectrum in gliomas.
Cancer Sci.
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2009
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Histopathological classification of gliomas is often clinically inadequate due to the diversity of tumors that fall within the same class. The goal of the present study was to identify prognostic molecular features in diffusely infiltrating gliomas using gene expression profiling. We selected 3456 genes expressed in gliomas, including 3012 genes found in a gliomal expressed sequence tag collection. The expression levels of these genes in 152 gliomas (100 glioblastomas, 21 anaplastic astrocytomas, 19 diffuse astrocytomas, and 12 anaplastic oligodendrogliomas) were measured using adapter-tagged competitive polymerase chain reaction, a high-throughput reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technique. We applied unsupervised and supervised principal component analyses to elucidate the prognostic molecular features of the gliomas. The gene expression data matrix was significantly correlated with the histological grades, oligo-astro histology, and prognosis. Using 110 gliomas, we constructed a prediction model based on the expression profile of 58 genes, resulting in a scheme that reliably classified the glioblastomas into two distinct prognostic subgroups. The model was then tested with another 42 tissues. Multivariate Cox analysis of the glioblastoma patients using other clinical prognostic factors, including age and the extent of surgical resection, indicated that the gene expression profile was a strong and independent prognostic parameter. The gene expression profiling identified clinically informative prognostic molecular features in astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors that were more reliable than the traditional histological classification scheme.
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Superresolution with compound Markov random fields via the variational EM algorithm.
Neural Netw
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2009
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This study deals with a reconstruction-type superresolution problem and the accompanying image registration problem simultaneously. We propose a Bayesian approach in which the prior is modeled as a compound Gaussian Markov random field (MRF) and marginalization is performed over unknown variables to avoid overfitting. Our algorithm not only avoids overfitting, but also preserves discontinuity in the estimated image, unlike existing single-layer Gaussian MRF models for Bayesian superresolution. Maximum-marginal-likelihood estimation of the registration parameters is carried out using a variational EM algorithm where hidden variables are marginalized out, and the posterior distribution is variationally approximated by a factorized trial distribution. High-resolution image estimates are obtained through the process of posterior computation in the EM algorithm. Experiments show that our Bayesian approach with the two-layer compound model exhibits better performance both in quantitative measures and visual quality than the single-layer model.
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Supercomputers ready for use as discovery machines for neuroscience.
Front Neuroinform
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NEST is a widely used tool to simulate biological spiking neural networks. Here we explain the improvements, guided by a mathematical model of memory consumption, that enable us to exploit for the first time the computational power of the K supercomputer for neuroscience. Multi-threaded components for wiring and simulation combine 8 cores per MPI process to achieve excellent scaling. K is capable of simulating networks corresponding to a brain area with 10(8) neurons and 10(12) synapses in the worst case scenario of random connectivity; for larger networks of the brain its hierarchical organization can be exploited to constrain the number of communicating computer nodes. We discuss the limits of the software technology, comparing maximum filling scaling plots for K and the JUGENE BG/P system. The usability of these machines for network simulations has become comparable to running simulations on a single PC. Turn-around times in the range of minutes even for the largest systems enable a quasi interactive working style and render simulations on this scale a practical tool for computational neuroscience.
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Dynamic regulation of myosin light chain phosphorylation by Rho-kinase.
PLoS ONE
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Myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation plays important roles in various cellular functions such as cellular morphogenesis, motility, and smooth muscle contraction. MLC phosphorylation is determined by the balance between activities of Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase) and myosin phosphatase. An impaired balance between Rho-kinase and myosin phosphatase activities induces the abnormal sustained phosphorylation of MLC, which contributes to the pathogenesis of certain vascular diseases, such as vasospasm and hypertension. However, the dynamic principle of the system underlying the regulation of MLC phosphorylation remains to be clarified. Here, to elucidate this dynamic principle whereby Rho-kinase regulates MLC phosphorylation, we developed a mathematical model based on the behavior of thrombin-dependent MLC phosphorylation, which is regulated by the Rho-kinase signaling network. Through analyzing our mathematical model, we predict that MLC phosphorylation and myosin phosphatase activity exhibit bistability, and that a novel signaling pathway leading to the auto-activation of myosin phosphatase is required for the regulatory system of MLC phosphorylation. In addition, on the basis of experimental data, we propose that the auto-activation pathway of myosin phosphatase occurs in vivo. These results indicate that bistability of myosin phosphatase activity is responsible for the bistability of MLC phosphorylation, and the sustained phosphorylation of MLC is attributed to this feature of bistability.
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A state-space modeling approach for localization of focal current sources from MEG.
IEEE Trans Biomed Eng
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State-space modeling is a promising approach for current source reconstruction from magnetoencephalography (MEG) because it constrains the spatiotemporal behavior of inverse solutions in a flexible manner. However, state-space model-based source localization research remains underdeveloped; extraction of spatially focal current sources and handling of the high dimensionality of the distributed source model remain problematic. In this study, we propose a novel state-space model-based method that resolves these problems, extending our previous source localization method to include a temporal constraint by state-space modeling. To enable focal current reconstruction, we account for spatially inhomogeneous temporal dynamics by introducing dynamics model parameters that differ for each cortical position. The model parameters and the intensity of the current sources are jointly estimated according to a bayesian framework. We circumvent the high dimensionality of the problem by assuming prior distributions of the model parameters to reduce the sensitivity to unmodeled components, and by adopting variational bayesian inference to reduce the computational cost. Through simulation experiments and application to real MEG data, we have confirmed that our proposed method successfully reconstructs focal current activities, which evolve with their temporal dynamics.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.