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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Self-monitoring urinary salt excretion in adults: A novel education program for restricting dietary salt intake.
Exp Ther Med
PUBLISHED: 03-29-2011
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This study aimed to examine the usefulness of the self-monitoring of urinary salt excretion for educating individuals about the risk of excessive dietary salt intake. The subjects were 30 volunteers (15 men and 15 women) not consuming anti-hypertensive medication. The subjects measured urinary salt excretion at home for 4 weeks using a self-monitoring device. Blood pressure (BP), anthropometric variables and nutritional variables (by a dietary-habits questionnaire) were measured before and after the measurement of urinary salt excretion. Statistical analyses were performed, including paired t-tests, Chi-square test, Pearsons product moment correlation coefficient and multiple linear regression analysis. In all subjects, the average urinary salt excretion over 4 weeks was 8.05±1.61 g/day and the range (maximum-minimum value) was 5.58±2.15 g/day. Salt excretion decreased significantly in weeks 3 and 4 (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). Diastolic BP decreased from 77.7±14.3 (at baseline) to 74.3±13.3 after 4 weeks (P<0.05), while systolic BP and anthropometric variables remained unchanged. Nutrition surveys indicated that energy intake was correlated with salt intake both before and after the measurements; changes in both variables during the observation period were correlated (r=0.40, P<0.05). The percentage of subjects who were aware of the restriction in dietary salt intake increased from 47 to 90%. In conclusion, daily monitoring of the amount of urinary salt excretion using a self-monitoring device appears to be an effective educational tool for improving the quality of life of healthy adults.
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Structures of SAS-6 suggest its organization in centrioles.
Science
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2011
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Centrioles are cylindrical, ninefold symmetrical structures with peripheral triplet microtubules strictly required to template cilia and flagella. The highly conserved protein SAS-6 constitutes the center of the cartwheel assembly that scaffolds centrioles early in their biogenesis. We determined the x-ray structure of the amino-terminal domain of SAS-6 from zebrafish, and we show that recombinant SAS-6 self-associates in vitro into assemblies that resemble cartwheel centers. Point mutations are consistent with the notion that centriole formation in vivo depends on the interactions that define the self-assemblies observed here. Thus, these interactions are probably essential to the structural organization of cartwheel centers.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.