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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
CD1a-autoreactive T cells recognize natural skin oils that function as headless antigens.
Nat. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 08-17-2013
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T cells autoreactive to the antigen-presenting molecule CD1a are common in human blood and skin, but the search for natural autoantigens has been confounded by background T cell responses to CD1 proteins and self lipids. After capturing CD1a-lipid complexes, we gently eluted ligands while preserving non-ligand-bound CD1a for testing lipids from tissues. CD1a released hundreds of ligands of two types. Inhibitory ligands were ubiquitous membrane lipids with polar head groups, whereas stimulatory compounds were apolar oils. We identified squalene and wax esters, which naturally accumulate in epidermis and sebum, as autoantigens presented by CD1a. The activation of T cells by skin oils suggested that headless mini-antigens nest within CD1a and displace non-antigenic resident lipids with large head groups. Oily autoantigens naturally coat the surface of the skin; thus, this points to a previously unknown mechanism of barrier immunity.
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CD1c tetramers detect ex vivo T cell responses to processed phosphomycoketide antigens.
J. Exp. Med.
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2013
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CD1c is expressed with high density on human dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells, yet its antigen presentation functions are the least well understood among CD1 family members. Using a CD1c-reactive T cell line (DN6) to complete an organism-wide survey of M. tuberculosis lipids, we identified C32 phosphomycoketide (PM) as a previously unknown molecule and a CD1c-presented antigen. CD1c binding and presentation of mycoketide antigens absolutely required the unusual, mycobacteria-specific lipid branching patterns introduced by polyketide synthase 12 (pks12). Unexpectedly, one TCR responded to diversely glycosylated and unglycosylated forms of mycoketide when presented by DCs and B cells. Yet cell-free systems showed that recognition was mediated only by the deglycosylated phosphoantigen. These studies identify antigen processing of a natural bacterial antigen in the human CD1c system, indicating that cells act on glycolipids to generate a highly simplified neoepitope composed of a sugar-free phosphate anion. Using knowledge of this processed antigen, we generated human CD1c tetramers, and demonstrate that CD1c-PM complexes stain T cell receptors (TCRs), providing direct evidence for a ternary interaction among CD1c-lipid-TCR. Furthermore, PM-loaded CD1c tetramers detect fresh human T cells from peripheral blood, demonstrating a polyclonal response to PM antigens in humans ex vivo.
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MAIT cell recognition of MR1 on bacterially infected and uninfected cells.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2013
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Mucosal-associated invariant T cells are a unique population of T cells that express a semi-invariant ?? TCR and are restricted by the MHC class I-related molecule MR1. MAIT cells recognize uncharacterized ligand(s) presented by MR1 through the cognate interaction between their TCR and MR1. To understand how the MAIT TCR recognizes MR1 at the surface of APCs cultured both with and without bacteria, we undertook extensive mutational analysis of both the MAIT TCR and MR1 molecule. We found differential contribution of particular amino acids to the MAIT TCR-MR1 interaction based upon the presence of bacteria, supporting the hypothesis that the structure of the MR1 molecules with the microbial-derived ligand(s) differs from the one with the endogenous ligand(s). Furthermore, we demonstrate that microbial-derived ligand(s) is resistant to proteinase K digestion and does not extract with common lipids, suggesting an unexpected class of antigen(s) might be recognized by this unique lymphocyte population.
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Discovery of deoxyceramides and diacylglycerols as CD1b scaffold lipids among diverse groove-blocking lipids of the human CD1 system.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 11-15-2011
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Unlike the dominant role of one class II invariant chain peptide (CLIP) in blocking MHC class II, comparative lipidomics analysis shows that human cluster of differentiation (CD) proteins CD1a, CD1b, CD1c, and CD1d bind lipids corresponding to hundreds of diverse accurate mass retention time values. Although most ions were observed in association with several CD1 proteins, ligands binding selectively to one CD1 isoform allowed the study of how differing antigen-binding grooves influence lipid capture. Although the CD1b groove is distinguished by its unusually large volume (2,200 Å(3)) and the T tunnel, the average mass of compounds eluted from CD1b was similar to that of lipids from CD1 proteins with smaller grooves. Elution of small ligands from the large CD1b groove might be explained if two small lipids bind simultaneously in the groove. Crystal structures indicate that all CD1 proteins can capture one antigen with its hydrophilic head group exposed for T-cell recognition, but CD1b structures show scaffold lipids seated below the antigen. We found that ligands selectively associated with CD1b lacked the hydrophilic head group that is generally needed for antigen recognition but interferes with scaffold function. Furthermore, we identified the scaffolds as deoxyceramides and diacylglycerols and directly demonstrate a function in augmenting presentation of a small glycolipid antigen to T cells. Thus, unlike MHC class II, CD1 proteins capture highly diverse ligands in the secretory pathway. CD1b has a mechanism for presenting either two small or one large lipid, allowing presentation of antigens with an unusually broad range of chain lengths.
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Endogenous MHC-related protein 1 is transiently expressed on the plasma membrane in a conformation that activates mucosal-associated invariant T cells.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2011
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The development of mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells is dependent upon the class Ib molecule MHC-related protein 1 (MR1), commensal bacteria, and a thymus. Furthermore, recent studies have implicated MR1 presentation to MAIT cells in bacteria recognition, although the mechanism remains undefined. Surprisingly, however, surface expression of MR1 has been difficult to detect serologically, despite ubiquitous detection of MR1 transcripts and intracellular protein. In this article, we define a unique mAb capable of stabilizing endogenous mouse MR1 at the cell surface, resulting in enhanced mouse MAIT cell activation. Our results demonstrated that under basal conditions, endogenous MR1 transiently visits the cell surface, thus reconciling the aforementioned serologic and functional studies. Furthermore, using this approach, double-positive thymocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells were identified as potential APCs for MAIT cell development and activation. Based on this pattern of MR1 expression, it is intriguing to speculate that constitutive expression of MR1 may be detrimental for maintenance of immune homeostasis in the gut and/or detection of pathogenic bacteria in mucosal tissues.
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Antimicrobial activity of mucosal-associated invariant T cells.
Nat. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2010
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Mucosal-associated invariant T lymphocytes (MAIT lymphocytes) are characterized by two evolutionarily conserved features: an invariant T cell antigen receptor (TCR) alpha-chain and restriction by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-related protein MR1. Here we show that MAIT cells were activated by cells infected with various strains of bacteria and yeast, but not cells infected with virus, in both humans and mice. This activation required cognate interaction between the invariant TCR and MR1, which can present a bacteria-derived ligand. In humans, we observed considerably fewer MAIT cells in blood from patients with bacterial infections such as tuberculosis. In the mouse, MAIT cells protected against infection by Mycobacterium abscessus or Escherichia coli. Thus, MAIT cells are evolutionarily conserved innate-like lymphocytes that sense and help fight off microbial infection.
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MR1 antigen presentation to mucosal-associated invariant T cells was highly conserved in evolution.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 04-30-2009
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Several nonclassical major histocompatibilty antigens (class Ib molecules) have emerged as key players in the early immune response to pathogens or stress. Class Ib molecules activate subsets of T cells that mount effector responses before the adaptive immune system, and thus are called innate T cells. MR1 is a novel class Ib molecule with properties highly suggestive of its regulation of mucosal immunity. The Mr1 gene is evolutionarily conserved, is non-Mhc linked, and controls the development of mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. MAIT cells preferentially reside in the gut, and their development is dependent on commensal microbiota. Although these properties suggest that MAIT cells function as innate T cells in the mucosa, this has been difficult to test, due to the (i) paucity of MAIT cells that display MR1-specific activation in vitro and (ii) lack of knowledge of whether or not MR1 presents antigen. Here we show that both mouse and human MAIT cells display a high level of cross-reactivity on mammalian MR1 orthologs, but with differences consistent with limited ligand discrimination. Furthermore, acid eluates from recombinant or cellular MR1 proteins enhance MAIT cell activation in an MR1-specific and cross-species manner. Our findings demonstrate that the presentation pathway of MR1 to MAIT cells is highly evolutionarily conserved.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.