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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Final long-term results of a phase I/II study of dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy for locally advanced laryngo-hypopharyngeal cancers.
Oral Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2014
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We previously described dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in squamous cell cancer of the larynx/hypopharynx (SCCL/H) to offer improved locoregional control with a low incidence of toxicity at 2years. We now present outcome and safety data at 5years.
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Multiple cervical lymph node involvement and extra-capsular extension predict for contralateral nodal recurrence after ipsilateral radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil.
Oral Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2014
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Ipsilateral radiotherapy is an established technique for treating well-lateralised tonsillar tumours. Concerns exist regarding the risk of contralateral nodal failure, particularly in patients with ipsilateral nodal involvement at presentation. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes of patients treated with ipsilateral radiotherapy aiming to identify factors that predispose to a higher risk of contralateral nodal recurrence.
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Fatigue during chemoradiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer and its relationship to radiation dose distribution in the brain.
Radiother Oncol
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2013
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Fatigue during head and neck radiotherapy may be related to radiation dose to the central nervous system (CNS). The impact of patient, tumour, and dosimetric variables on acute fatigue was assessed in nasopharyngeal cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy.
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The effect of concomitant chemotherapy on parotid gland function following head and neck IMRT.
Radiother Oncol
PUBLISHED: 02-17-2013
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To determine whether concomitant chemotherapy increases the incidence of high grade xerostomia following parotid-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell cancer.
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Dose-response analysis of parotid gland function: what is the best measure of xerostomia?
Radiother Oncol
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2013
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To describe the dose-response relationships for the different measures of salivary gland recovery following radical radiotherapy for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell cancers (LA-HNSCC).
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Dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy is feasible and may improve locoregional control and laryngeal preservation in laryngo-hypopharyngeal cancers.
Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2011
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To determine the safety and outcomes of induction chemotherapy followed by dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concomitant chemotherapy in locally advanced squamous cell cancer of the larynx and hypopharynx (LA-SCCL/H).
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Parotid-sparing intensity modulated versus conventional radiotherapy in head and neck cancer (PARSPORT): a phase 3 multicentre randomised controlled trial.
Lancet Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2011
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Xerostomia is the most common late side-effect of radiotherapy to the head and neck. Compared with conventional radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce irradiation of the parotid glands. We assessed the hypothesis that parotid-sparing IMRT reduces the incidence of severe xerostomia.
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Phase I/II study of oncolytic HSV GM-CSF in combination with radiotherapy and cisplatin in untreated stage III/IV squamous cell cancer of the head and neck.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2010
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This study sought to define the recommended dose of JS1/34.5-/47-/GM-CSF, an oncolytic herpes simplex type-1 virus (HSV-1) encoding human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), for future studies in combination with chemoradiotherapy in patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN).
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Therapeutic effect of sodium iodide symporter gene therapy combined with external beam radiotherapy and targeted drugs that inhibit DNA repair.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 06-29-2010
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Adenoviral (AdV) transfer of sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene has translational potential, but relatively low levels of transduction and subsequent radioisotope uptake limit the efficacy of the approach. In previous studies, we showed that combining NIS gene delivery with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and DNA damage repair inhibitors increased viral gene expression and radioiodide uptake. Here, we report the therapeutic efficacy of this strategy. An adenovirus expressing NIS from a telomerase promoter (Ad-hTR-NIS) was cytotoxic combined with relatively high-dose (50 microCi) (131)I therapy and enhanced the efficacy of EBRT combined with low-dose (10 and 25 microCi) (131)I therapy in colorectal and head and neck cancer cells. Combining this approach with ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) or DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) inhibition caused maintenance of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) at 24 hours and increased cytotoxicity on clonogenic assay. When the triplet of NIS-mediated (131)I therapy, EBRT, and DNA-PKi was used in vivo, 90% of mice were tumor-free at 5 weeks. Acute radiation toxicity in the EBRT field was not exacerbated. In contrast, DNA-PKi did not enhance the therapeutic efficacy of EBRT plus adenovirus-mediated HSVtk/ganciclovir (GCV). Therefore, combining NIS gene therapy and EBRT represents an ideal strategy to exploit the therapeutic benefits of novel radiosensitizers.
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Characteristics of response of oral and pharyngeal mucosa in patients receiving chemo-IMRT for head and neck cancer using hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy.
Radiother Oncol
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2010
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This study describes the acute response of oral and pharyngeal mucosa to chemo-IMRT schedules using different doses per fraction.
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Weekly volume and dosimetric changes during chemoradiotherapy with intensity-modulated radiation therapy for head and neck cancer: a prospective observational study.
Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2010
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The aim of this study was to investigate prospectively the weekly volume changes in the target volumes and organs at risk and the resulting dosimetric changes during induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (C-IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer patients.
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Correlation between dose to the pharyngeal constrictors and patient quality of life and late dysphagia following chemo-IMRT for head and neck cancer.
Radiother Oncol
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2009
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Aim of this study was to correlate dose to pharyngeal constrictors (PC) with subjective and observer-based assessments of swallowing in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing concomitant chemo-IMRT.
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Anemia during sequential induction chemotherapy and chemoradiation for head and neck cancer: the impact of blood transfusion on treatment outcome.
Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
PUBLISHED: 02-03-2009
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Sequential treatment (chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiation; CCRT) is increasingly being used for radical treatment of squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN), which results in increased myelosuppression. In this study, we review the incidence of anemia and the effect of a policy of hemoglobin (Hb) maintenance by blood transfusion on disease outcomes in these patients.
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Changes in functional imaging parameters following induction chemotherapy have important implications for individualised patient-based treatment regimens for advanced head and neck cancer.
Radiother Oncol
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When induction chemotherapy (IC) is used prior to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head and neck cancer (HNC), functional imaging (FI) may inform adaptation of treatment plans with the aim of optimising outcomes. Understanding the impact of IC on FI parameters is, therefore, essential.
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Reovirus exerts potent oncolytic effects in head and neck cancer cell lines that are independent of signalling in the EGFR pathway.
BMC Cancer
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Reovirus exploits aberrant signalling downstream of Ras to mediate tumor-specific oncolysis. Since ~90% squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) over-express EGFR and SCCHN cell lines are sensitive to oncolytic reovirus, we conducted a detailed analysis of the effects of reovirus in 15 head and neck cancer cell lines. Both pre- and post-entry events were studied in an attempt to define biomarkers predictive of sensitivity/resistance to reovirus. In particular, we analysed the role of EGFR/Ras signalling in determining virus-mediated cytotoxicity in SCCHN.
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The HSP90 inhibitor NVP-AUY922 radiosensitizes by abrogation of homologous recombination resulting in mitotic entry with unresolved DNA damage.
PLoS ONE
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Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone responsible for the conformational maintenance of a number of client proteins that play key roles in cell cycle arrest, DNA damage repair and apoptosis following radiation. HSP90 inhibitors exhibit antitumor activity by modulating the stabilisation and activation of HSP90 client proteins. We sought to evaluate NVP-AUY922, the most potent HSP90 inhibitor yet reported, in preclinical radiosensitization studies.
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Prospective intra-patient evaluation of a shoulder retraction device for radiotherapy in head and neck cancer.
Med Dosim
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Irradiation of tumors in the larynx and pharynx is often technically challenging in patients with a short neck or high shoulders. Shoulder retraction devices can sometimes resolve this problem and allow irradiation via lateral beam directions. This study aimed to measure the proportion of patients who would benefit from such an approach and to quantify the magnitude of the benefit obtained. Twenty patients were studied. Simulator images were obtained before and after intervention. The additional exposure of the cervical spine was measured. Patient comfort and acceptability were assessed with a questionnaire. Improvement of exposure of the cervical spine was observed in 80% of patients. In 20%, there was either no difference or the position was worse. Shoulder retraction exposed a mean of 8.4-10.2 mm more of the cervical spine. Patients in general reported the device as comfortable. The use of a shoulder retraction device produced clinically significant improvements in exposure of the tissues of the cervical spine and neck and should be considered in patients being irradiated for tumors arising in the larynx or hypopharynx.
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Dose-response analysis of acute oral mucositis and pharyngeal dysphagia in patients receiving induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemo-IMRT for head and neck cancer.
Radiother Oncol
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Dose-response curves (DRCs) and the quantitative parameters describing these curves were generated for grade 3 oral mucositis and dysphagia in 144 patients using individual patient DVHs. Curve fits to the oral mucositis clinical data yielded parameter values of mean dose in 2 Gy equivalent, MD(50) = 51 Gy (95% CI 40-61), slope of the curve, k = 1(95% CI 0.6-1.5). R(2) value for the goodness of fit was 0.80. Fits to the grade 3 dysphagia clinical data yielded parameter values of MD(50) = 44.5 Gy (95% CI 36-53), k = 2.6 (95% CI 0.8-4.5). R(2) value for the goodness of fit was 0.65. This is the first study to derive DRCs in patients receiving induction chemotherapy followed by chemo-radiation (IC-C-IMRT) for head and neck cancer. The dose-response model described in this study could be useful for comparing acute mucositis rates for different dose-fractionation schedules when using IMRT for head and neck cancer.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.