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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Naoxintong protects against atherosclerosis through lipid-lowering and inhibiting maturation of dendritic cells in LDL receptor knockout mice fed a high-fat diet.
Curr. Pharm. Des.
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2013
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Naoxintong (NXT), a Chinese Materia Medica standardized product, extracted from 16 various kinds of Chinese traditional herbal medicines including Salvia miltiorrhiza, Angelica sinennsis, Astragali Radix, is clinically effective in treating atherosclerosisrelated diseases. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the anti-atherosclerosis effects of NXT might be mediated by suppressing maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) in a mice model of atherosclerosis. LDLR(-/-) mice fed a high-fat diet were treated with placebo, NXT (0.7 g/kg/d, oral diet) or simvastatin (100mg/kg/d, oral diet) for 8 weeks, respectively. NXT treatment significantly reduced plasma triglyceride (112 ± 18 mg/dl vs. 192 ± 68 mg/dl, P<0.05) and total cholesterol (944 ± 158 mg/dl vs. 1387 ± 208 mg/dl, P<0.05) compared to placebo treatment. Vascular lesions were significantly smaller and macrophage content and amount of DCs in plaques were significantly less in NXT and simvastatin groups than in placebo group (all P<0.05). In addition, expressions of splenic DC membrane molecules (CD40, CD86 and CD80) and the plasma level of IL-12p70 were significantly lower in NXT and simvastatin groups than in placebo group. In conclusion, NXT protects against atherosclerosis through lipid-lowering and inhibiting DCs maturation in this mice model of atherosclerosis.
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Brachial artery diameter, blood flow and flow-mediated dilation in sleep-disordered breathing.
Vasc Med
PUBLISHED: 10-08-2009
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Clinic-based, case-control studies linked sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) to markers of endothelial dysfunction. We attempted to validate this association in a large community-based sample, and evaluate the relation of SDB to arterial diameter and peripheral blood flow. This community-based, cross-sectional observational study included 327 men and 355 women, aged 42-83 years, from the Framingham Heart Study site of the Sleep Heart Health Study. The polysomnographically derived apnea-hypopnea index and the hypoxemia index (percent sleep time with oxyhemoglobin saturation below 90%) were used to quantify the severity of SDB. Brachial artery ultrasound measurements included baseline diameter, percent flow-mediated dilation, and baseline and hyperemic flow velocity and volume. The baseline brachial artery diameter was significantly associated with both the apnea-hypopnea index and the hypoxemia index. The association was diminished by adjustment for body mass index, but remained significant for the apnea-hypopnea index. Age-, sex-, race- and body mass index-adjusted mean diameters were 4.32, 4.33, 4.33, 4.56, 4.53 mm for those with apnea-hypopnea index < 1.5, 1.5-4.9, 5-14.9, 15-29.9, >/= 30, respectively; p = 0.03. Baseline flow measures were associated with the apnea-hypopnea index but this association was non-significant after adjusting for body mass index. No significant association was observed between measures of SDB and percent flow-mediated dilation or hyperemic flow in any model. In conclusion, this study supports a moderate association of SDB and larger baseline brachial artery diameter, which may reflect SDB-induced vascular remodeling. This study does not support a link between SDB and endothelial dysfunction as measured by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.