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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Selective methioninase-induced trap of cancer cells in S/G2 phase visualized by FUCCI imaging confers chemosensitivity.
Oncotarget
PUBLISHED: 09-20-2014
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A major impediment to the response of tumors to chemotherapy is that the large majority of cancer cells within a tumor are quiescent in G0/G1, where cancer cells are resistant to chemotherapy. To attempt to solve this problem of quiescent cells in a tumor, cancer cells were treated with recombinant methioninase (rMETase), which selectively traps cancer cells in S/G2. The cell cycle phase of the cancer cells was visualized with the fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator cell cycle indicator (FUCCI). At the time of rMETase-induced S/G2-phase blockage, identified by the cancer cells' green fluorescence by FUCCI imaging, the cancer cells were administered S/G2-dependent chemotherapy drugs, which interact with DNA or block DNA synthesis such as doxorubicin, cisplatin, or 5-fluorouracil. Treatment of cancer cells with drugs only, without rMETase-induced S/G2 phase blockage, led to the majority of the cancer-cell population being blocked in G0/G1 phase, identified by the cancer cells becoming red fluorescent in the FUCCI system. The G0/G1 blocked cells were resistant to the chemotherapy. In contrast, trapping of cancer cells in S/G2 phase by rMETase treatment followed by FUCCI-imaging-guided chemotherapy was highly effective in killing the cancer cells.
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Efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R in combination with anti-angiogenesis therapy on a pancreatic cancer patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) and cell line mouse models.
Oncotarget
PUBLISHED: 09-17-2014
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The aim of the present study was to examine the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R treatment following anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy on VEGF-positive human pancreatic cancer. A pancreatic cancer patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) that was VEGF-positive and an orthotopic VEGF-positive human pancreatic cancer cell line (MiaPaCa-2-GFP) as well as a VEGF-negative cell line (Panc-1) were tested. Nude mice with these tumors were treated with gemcitabine (GEM), bevacizumab (BEV), and S. typhimurium A1-R. BEV/GEM followed by S. typhimurium A1-R significantly reduced tumor weight compared to BEV/GEM treatment alone in the PDOX and MiaPaCa-2 models. Neither treatment was as effective in the VEGF-negative model as in the VEGF-positive models. These results demonstrate that S. typhimurium A1-R following anti-angiogenic therapy is effective on pancreatic cancer including the PDOX model, suggesting its clinical potential.
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Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R prevents experimental human breast cancer bone metastasis in nude mice.
Oncotarget
PUBLISHED: 09-13-2014
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Bone metastasis is a lethal and morbid late stage of breast cancer that is currently treatment resistant. More effective mouse models and treatment are necessary. High bone-metastatic variants of human breast cancer cells were selected in nude mice by cardiac injection. After cardiac injection of a high bone-metastatic variant of breast cancer, all untreated mice had bone metastases compared to only 20% with parental cells. Treatment with tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R completely prevented the appearance of bone metastasis of the high metastatic variant in nude mice (P < 0.001). After injection of the highly bone-metastatic breast cancer variant to the tibia of nude mice, S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly reduced tumor growth in the bone (P < 0.001). These data indicated that S. typhimurium A1-R is useful to prevent and inhibit breast cancer bone metastasis and should be of future clinical use for breast cancer in the adjuvant setting.
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Fluorescence-guided surgery improves outcome in an orthotopic osteosarcoma nude-mouse model.
J. Orthop. Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2014
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In order to develop a model for fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS), 143B human osteosarcoma cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were injected into the intramedullary cavity of the tibia in nude mice. The fluorescent areas of residual tumors after bright-light surgery (BLS) and FGS were 10.2?±?2.4?mm(2) and 0.1?±?0.1?mm(2) , respectively (p?
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The tumor-educated-macrophage increase of malignancy of human pancreatic cancer is prevented by zoledronic acid.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-12-2014
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We previously defined macrophages harvested from the peritoneal cavity of nude mice with subcutaneous human pancreatic tumors as "tumor-educated-macrophages" (Edu) and macrophages harvested from mice without tumors as "naïve-macrophages" (Naïve), and demonstrated that Edu-macrophages promoted tumor growth and metastasis. In this study, Edu- and Naïve-macrophages were compared for their ability to enhance pancreatic cancer malignancy at the cellular level in vitro and in vivo. The inhibitory efficacy of Zoledronic acid (ZA) on Edu-macrophage-enhanced metastasis was also determined. XPA1 human pancreatic cancer cells in Gelfoam co-cultured with Edu-macrophages proliferated to a greater extent compared to XPA1 cells cultured with Naïve-macrophages (P = 0.014). XPA1 cells exposed to conditioned medium harvested from Edu culture significantly increased proliferation (P = 0.016) and had more migration stimulation capability (P<0.001) compared to cultured cancer cells treated with the conditioned medium from Naïve. The mitotic index of the XPA1 cells, expressing GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm, significantly increased in vivo in the presence of Edu- compared to Naïve-macrophages (P = 0.001). Zoledronic acid (ZA) killed both Edu and Naïve in vitro. Edu promoted tumor growth and metastasis in an orthotopic mouse model of the XPA1 human pancreatic cancer cell line. ZA reduced primary tumor growth (P = 0.006) and prevented metastasis (P = 0.025) promoted by Edu-macrophages. These results indicate that ZA inhibits enhanced primary tumor growth and metastasis of human pancreatic cancer induced by Edu-macrophages.
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Efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on nude mouse models of metastatic and disseminated human ovarian cancer.
J. Cell. Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2014
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We report here the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (A1-R) on mouse models of disseminated and metastatic ovarian cancer. The proliferation-inhibitory efficacy of A1-R on human ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV-3-GFP, OVCAR-3-RFP) was initially demonstrated in vitro. Orthotopic and dissemination mouse models of ovarian cancer were made with the human ovarian cancer cell line SKOV-3-GFP. After tumor implantation, the mice were treated with A1-R (5?×?10(7) ?colony-forming units [CFU], i.v.), and there were no severe adverse events observed. In the orthotopic model, tumor volume after treatment was 276?±?60.8?mm(3), compared to 930?±?342?mm(3) in the untreated control group (P?=?0.022). There was also a significant difference in survival between treated mice and untreated mice in a peritoneal dissemination model (P?=?0.005). The results of this report demonstrate that A1-R is effective for highly aggressive human ovarian cancer in metastatic and dissemination mouse models and suggest its clinical potential for this highly treatment-resistant disease.
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Spatial-temporal FUCCI imaging of each cell in a tumor demonstrates locational dependence of cell cycle dynamics and chemoresponsiveness.
Cell Cycle
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2014
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The phase of the cell cycle can determine whether a cancer cell can respond to a given drug. We report here on the results of monitoring of real-time cell cycle dynamics of cancer cells throughout a live tumor intravitally using a fluorescence ubiquitination cell cycle indicator (FUCCI) before, during, and after chemotherapy. In nascent tumors in nude mice, approximately 30% of the cells in the center of the tumor are in G?/G? and 70% in S/G?/M. In contrast, approximately 90% of cancer cells in the center and 80% of total cells of an established tumor are in G?/G? phase. Similarly, approximately 75% of cancer cells far from (> 100 µm) tumor blood vessels of an established tumor are in G?/G?. Longitudinal real-time imaging demonstrated that cytotoxic agents killed only proliferating cancer cells at the surface and, in contrast, had little effect on quiescent cancer cells, which are the vast majority of an established tumor. Moreover, resistant quiescent cancer cells restarted cycling after the cessation of chemotherapy. Our results suggest why most drugs currently in clinical use, which target cancer cells in S/G?/M, are mostly ineffective on solid tumors. The results also suggest that drugs that target quiescent cancer cells are urgently needed.
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Comparison of UVB and UVC effects on the DNA damage-response protein 53BP1 in human pancreatic cancer.
J. Cell. Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2014
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We have previously demonstrated that ultraviolet (UV) light is effective against a variety of cancer cells expressing fluorescent proteins in vivo as well as in vitro. In the present report, we compared the DNA damage repair (DDR) response of pancreatic cancer cells after UVB or UVC irradiation. The UV-induced DNA damage repair was imaged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to the DDR-related chromatin-binding protein 53BP1 in MiaPaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells growing in 3D Gelfoam® histoculture and in superficial tumors grown in nude mice. 53BP1-GFP forms foci during DNA damage repair. A clonogenic assay in 2D monolayer culture initially showed that UVC and UVB inhibited MiaPaCa-2 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, with UVC having more efficacy. Three-dimensional Gelfoam® histocultures and confocal imaging enabled 53BP1-GFP foci to be observed within 1?h after UV irradiation, indicating the onset of DDR response. UVB-induced 53BP1-GFP focus formation was observed up to a depth of 120?µm in MiaPaCa-2 cells on Gelfoam® compared to 80?µm for UVC. UVB-induced 53BP1-GFP focus formation was observed up to a depth of 80?µm in MiaPaCa-2 cells, implanted within skin flaps in mice, at a significantly greater extent than UVC. MiaPaCa-2 cells irradiated by UVB or UVC in the skin-flap mouse model had a significant decrease in tumor growth compared to untreated controls with UVB having more efficacy than UVC. Our results demonstrate that UVB has greater tissue penetration than UVC because of its longer wavelength and has clinical potential for eradicating superficial cancer.
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Osteosarcoma cells enhance angiogenesis visualized by color-coded imaging in the in vivo Gelfoam® assay.
J. Cell. Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2014
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We previously described a color-coded imaging model that can quantify the length of nascent blood vessels using Gelfoam® implanted in nestin-driven green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP) nude mice. In ND-GFP mice, nascent blood vessels are labeled with GFP. We report here that osteosarcoma cells promote angiogenesis in the Gelfoam® angiogenesis assay in ND-GFP mice. Gelfoam® was initially transplanted subcutaneously in the flank of transgenic ND-GFP nude mice. Seven days after transplantation of Gelfoam®, skin flaps were made and human 143B osteosarcoma cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus and red fluorescent protein (RFP) in cytoplasm were injected into the transplanted Gelfoam®. The control-group mice had only implanted Gelfoam®. Skin flaps were made at days 14, 21, and 28 after transplantation of the Gelfoam® to allow imaging of vascularization in the Gelfoam® using a variable-magnification small animal imaging system and confocal fluorescence microscopy. ND-GFP expressing nascent blood vessels penetrated and spread into the Gelfoam® in a time-dependent manner in both control and osteosarcoma-implanted mice. ND-GFP expressing blood vessels in the Gelfoam® of the osteosarcoma-implanted mice were associated with the cancer cells and larger and longer than in the Gelfoam®-only implanted mice (P?
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Fluorescence-guided surgery of prostate cancer bone metastasis.
J. Surg. Res.
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2014
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The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) of prostate cancer experimental skeletal metastasis.
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Successful fluorescence-guided surgery on human colon cancer patient-derived orthotopic xenograft mouse models using a fluorophore-conjugated anti-CEA antibody and a portable imaging system.
J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2014
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Fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) can enable successful cancer surgery where bright-light surgery often cannot. There are three important issues for FGS going forward toward the clinic: (a) proper tumor labeling, (b) a simple portable imaging system for the operating room, and (c) patient-like mouse models in which to develop the technology. The present report addresses all three.
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3-dimensional tissue is formed from cancer cells in vitro on Gelfoam®, but not on Matrigel™.
J. Cell. Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2014
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Cell and tissue culture can be performed on different substrates such as on plastic, in Matrigel™, and on Gelfoam(®), a sponge matrix. Each of these substrates consists of a very different surface, ranging from hard and inflexible, a gel, and a sponge-matrix, respectively. Folkman and Moscona found that cell shape was tightly coupled to DNA synthesis and cell growth. Therefore, the flexibility of a substrate is important for cells to maintain their optimal shape. Human osteosarcoma cells, stably expressing a fusion protein of ?(v) integrin and green fluorescent protein (GFP), grew as a simple monolayer without any structure formation on the surface of a plastic dish. When the osteosarcoma cells were cultured within Matrigel™, the cancer cells formed colonies but no other structures. When the cancer cells were seeded on Gelfoam(®), the cells formed three-dimensional tissue-like structures. The behavior of 143B osteosarcoma cells on Gelfoam(®) in culture is remarkably different from those of these cells in monolayer culture or in Matrigel™. Tissue-like structures were observed only in Gelfoam(®) culture. The data in this report suggest a flexible structural substrate such as Gelfoam(®) provides a more in vivo-like culture condition than monolayer culture or Matrigel(TM) and that Matrigel(TM) does not result in actual three-dimensional culture.
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Invading cancer cells are predominantly in G0/G1 resulting in chemoresistance demonstrated by real-time FUCCI imaging.
Cell Cycle
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2014
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Invasive cancer cells are a critical target in order to prevent metastasis. In the present report, we demonstrate real-time visualization of cell cycle kinetics of invading cancer cells in 3-dimensional (3D) Gelfoam® histoculture, which is in vivo-like. A fluorescence ubiquitination cell cycle indicator (FUCCI) whereby G0/G1 cells express a red fluorescent protein and S/G2/M cells express a green fluorescent protein was used to determine the cell cycle position of invading and non-invading cells. With FUCCI 3D confocal imaging, we observed that cancer cells in G0/G1 phase in Gelfoam® histoculture migrated more rapidly and further than cancer cells in S/G2/M phases. Cancer cells ceased migrating when they entered S/G2/M phases and restarted migrating after cell division when the cells re-entered G0/G1. Migrating cancer cells also were resistant to cytotoxic chemotherapy, since they were preponderantly in G0/G1, where cytotoxic chemotherapy is not effective. The results of the present report suggest that novel therapy targeting G0/G1 cancer cells should be developed to prevent metastasis.
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Efficacy of Salmonella typhimurium A1-R versus chemotherapy on a pancreatic cancer patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX).
J. Cell. Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2014
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The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (A1-R) on pancreatic cancer patient-derived orthotopic xenografts (PDOX). The PDOX model was originally established from a pancreatic cancer patient in SCID-NOD mice. The pancreatic cancer PDOX was subsequently transplanted by surgical orthotopic implantation (SOI) in transgenic nude red fluorescent protein (RFP) mice in order that the PDOX stably acquired red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing stroma for the purpose of imaging the tumor after passage to non-transgenic nude mice in order to visualize tumor growth and drug efficacy. The nude mice with human pancreatic PDOX were treated with A1-R or standard chemotherapy, including gemcitabine (GEM), which is first-line therapy for pancreatic cancer, for comparison of efficacy. A1-R treatment significantly reduced tumor weight, as well as tumor fluorescence area, compared to untreated control (P?=?0.011), with comparable efficacy of GEM, CDDP, and 5-FU. Histopathological response to treatment was defined according to Evans's criteria and A1-R had increased efficacy compared to standard chemotherapy. The present report is the first to show that A1-R is effective against a very low-passage patient tumor, in this case, pancreatic cancer. The data of the present report suggest A1-1 will have clinical activity in pancreatic cancer, a highly lethal and treatment-resistant disease and may be most effectively used in combination with other agents.
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Fluorescence-guided surgery in combination with UVC irradiation cures metastatic human pancreatic cancer in orthotopic mouse models.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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The aim of this study is to determine if ultraviolet light (UVC) irradiation in combination with fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) can eradicate metastatic human pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude-mouse models. Two weeks after orthotopic implantation of human MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells, expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP), in nude mice, bright-light surgery (BLS) was performed on all tumor-bearing mice (n?=?24). After BLS, mice were randomized into 3 treatment groups; BLS-only (n?=?8) or FGS (n?=?8) or FGS-UVC (n?=?8). The residual tumors were resected using a hand-held portable imaging system under fluorescence navigation in mice treated with FGS and FGS-UVC. The surgical resection bed was irradiated with 2700 J/m2 UVC (254 nm) in the mice treated with FGS-UVC. The average residual tumor area after FGS (n?=?16) was significantly smaller than after BLS only (n?=?24) (0.135±0.137 mm2 and 3.338±2.929 mm2, respectively; p?=?0.007). The BLS treated mice had significantly reduced survival compared to FGS- and FGS-UVC-treated mice for both relapse-free survival (RFS) (p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively) and overall survival (OS) (p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively). FGS-UVC-treated mice had increased RFS and OS compared to FGS-only treated mice (p?=?0.008 and p?=?0.025, respectively); with RFS lasting at least 150 days indicating the animals were cured. The results of the present study suggest that UVC irradiation in combination with FGS has clinical potential to increase survival.
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A Genetically Engineered Oncolytic Adenovirus Decoys and Lethally Traps Quiescent Cancer Stem-like Cells in S/G2/M Phases.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2013
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Because chemoradiotherapy selectively targets proliferating cancer cells, quiescent cancer stem-like cells are resistant. Mobilization of the cell cycle in quiescent leukemia stem cells sensitizes them to cell death signals. However, it is unclear that mobilization of the cell cycle can eliminate quiescent cancer stem-like cells in solid cancers. Thus, we explored the use of a genetically-engineered telomerase-specific oncolytic adenovirus, OBP-301, to mobilize the cell cycle and kill quiescent cancer stem-like cells.
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Hand-held high-resolution fluorescence imaging system for fluorescence-guided surgery of patient and cell-line pancreatic tumors growing orthotopically in nude mice.
J. Surg. Res.
PUBLISHED: 09-15-2013
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In this study, we investigated the advantages of fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) in mice of a portable hand-sized imaging system compared with a large fluorescence imaging system or a long-working-distance fluorescence microscope.
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Comparison of efficacy of Salmonella typhimurium A1-R and chemotherapy on stem-like and non-stem human pancreatic cancer cells.
Cell Cycle
PUBLISHED: 08-06-2013
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The XPA1 human pancreatic cancer cell line is dimorphic, with spindle stem-like cells and round non-stem cells. We report here the in vitro IC 50 values of stem-like and non-stem XPA1 human pancreatic cells cells for: (1) 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), (2) cisplatinum (CDDP), (3) gemcitabine (GEM), and (4) tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (A1-R). IC 50 values of stem-like XPA1 cells were significantly higher than those of non-stem XPA1 cells for 5-FU (P = 0.007) and CDDP (P = 0.012). In contrast, there was no difference between the efficacy of A1-R on stem-like and non-stem XPA1 cells. In vivo, 5-FU and A1-R significantly reduced the tumor weight of non-stem XPA1 cells (5-FU; P = 0.028; A1-R; P = 0.011). In contrast, only A1-R significantly reduced tumor weight of stem-like XPA1 cells (P = 0.012). The combination A1-R with 5-FU improved the antitumor efficacy compared with 5-FU monotherapy on the stem-like cells (P = 0.004). The results of the present report indicate A1-R is a promising therapy for chemo-resistant pancreatic cancer stem-like cells.
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Color-coded imaging of spontaneous vessel anastomosis in vivo.
Anticancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2013
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Vessel anastomosis is important in tumor angiogenesis as well as for vascularization therapy for ischemia and other diseases. We report here the development of a color-coded imaging model that can visualize the anastomosis between blood vessels of red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing vessels in vascularized Gelfoam® previously transplanted into RFP transgenic mice and then re-transplanted into nestin-driven green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP) mice where nascent blood vessels express GFP. Gelfoam® was initially transplanted subcutaneously in the flank of transgenic RFP nude mice. Skin flaps were made at 14 days after transplantation of Gelfoam® to allow observation of vascularization of the Gelfoam® using confocal fluorescence imaging. The implanted Gelfoam® became highly vascularized with RFP vessels. Fourteen days after transplantation into RFP transgenic nude mice, the Gelfoam® was removed and re-transplanted into the subcutis on the flank of ND-GFP transgenic nude mice in which nascent blood vessels express GFP. Skin flaps were made and anastomosis between the GFP-expressing nascent blood vessels of ND-GFP transgenic nude mice and RFP blood vessels in the Gelfoam® was imaged 14 and 21 days after re-transplantation. The results presented in this report indicate a possible mechanism for tumor angiogenesis and suggest a new paradigm of therapeutic revascularization of ischemic organs requiring new blood vessels and in other diseases.
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Real-time imaging of ?v integrin molecular dynamics in osteosarcoma cells in vitro and in vivo.
Anticancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2013
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?v Integrin is involved in various steps of cancer metastasis. In this report, we describe real-time imaging of ?v integrin molecular dynamics in human 143B osteosarcoma cells in vitro and in vivo. We first generated osteosarcoma cells expressing ?v integrin green fluorescent protein (GFP) by transfection of an ?v integrin GFP fusion vector (pCMV6-AC-ITGAV-GFP) into 143B cells. Confocal laser-scanning microscopy demonstrated that ?v integrin immunofluorescence staining co-localized with ?v integrin-GFP fluorescence in 143B cells. When ?v integrin-GFP-expressing 143B osteosarcoma cells were seeded on a dish coated with fibronectin, which is bound by ?v integrin, punctate ?v integrin-GFP was observed by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. When the 143B ?v integrin-GFP cells were seeded onto uncoated plastic, ?v integrin-GFP was diffuse within the cells. When ?v integrin-GFP 143B osteosarcoma cells (1×10(6)) were orthotopically transplanted into the tibia of nude mice, the cells aligned along the collagen fibers within the tumor and had punctuate expression of ?v integrin-GFP. In the orthotopic model, the invading osteosarcoma cells had punctate ?v integrin-GFP in the muscle tissue at the primary tumor margin. These results show that ?v integrin-GFP enables the imaging of the molecular dynamics of ?v integrin in osteosarcoma cells in vitro and in vivo.
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Enhanced resection of orthotopic red-fluorescent-protein-expressing human glioma by fluorescence-guided surgery in nude mice.
Anticancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2013
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Malignant glioma is the most common type of primary central nervous system cancer. Gliomas are very difficult to completely resect due to their invasiveness. In the present study, we compared fluorescence-guided and standard bright-light resection of a human glioma orthotopically implanted in nude mice. U87 human glioma cells, expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP), were injected stereotactically into the nude mouse brain through a craniotomy open window. Two weeks after cancer-cell implantation, gliomas were resected under fluorescence guidance or under bright light. U87-RFP tumors were clearly visualized with a long-working distance fluorescence microscope. Almost all cancer cells were removed using fluorescence-guided navigation without damage to the brain tissue. In contrast, brain tumors were difficult to visualize under bright light and many residual cancer cells remained in the brain after bright-light surgery. Fluorescence-guided surgery significantly extended the survival of the mice compared to those who underwent bright-light surgery. These results suggest that fluorescence-guided surgery has significant potential for brain cancer treatment.
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Imaging UVC-induced DNA damage response in models of minimal cancer.
J. Cell. Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2013
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We have previously demonstrated that the ultraviolet (UV) light is effective against a variety of cancer cells in vivo as well as in vitro. In the present report, we imaged the DNA damage repair response of minimal cancer after UVC irradiation. DNA-damage repair response to UV irradiation was imaged on tumors growing in 3D culture and in superficial tumors grown in vivo. UV-induced DNA damage repair was imaged with GFP fused to the DNA damage response (DDR)-related chromatin-binding protein 53BP1 in MiaPaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells. Three-dimensional Gelfoam® histocultures and confocal imaging enabled 53BP1-GFP nuclear foci to be observed within 1?h after UVC irradiation, indicating the onset of DNA damage repair response. A clonogenic assay showed that UVC inhibited MiaPaCa-2 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, while UVA and UVB showed little effect on cell proliferation. Induction of UV-induced 53BP1-GFP focus formation was limited up to a depth of 40?µm in 3D-culture of MiaPaCa-2 cells. The MiaPaCa-2 cells irradiated by UVC light in a skin-flap mouse model had a significant decrease of tumor growth compared to untreated controls. Our results also demonstrate that 53BP1-GFP is an imageable marker of UV-induced DNA damage repair response of minimal cancer and that UVC is a useful tool for the treatment of residual cancer since UVC can kill superficial cancer cells without damage to deep tissue.
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Single cell time-lapse imaging of focus formation by the DNA damage-response protein 53BP1 after UVC irradiation of human pancreatic cancer cells.
Anticancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2013
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We have previously demonstrated that ultraviolet (UV) light treatment is effective against various types of cancer cells expressing fluorescent proteins. In order to further understand the efficacy of UV treatment of cancer cells, we determined the kinetics of focus formation by imaging of a DNA damage-response (DDR) protein after UVC irradiation of human pancreatic cancer cells. A fusion protein consisting of the DDR protein 53BP1 and green fluorescent protein (GFP) (GFP-53BP1) was used as a live-cell imaging marker for cellular response after UVC irradiation. GFP-53BP1 foci were observed after UVC irradiation of MiaPaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells. During live-cell imaging, GFP-53BP1 foci were observed in the cells within 15 min after UVC irradiation, and some of the foci remained stable for at least three hours. GFP-53BP1 focus formation was observed in the pancreatic-cancer cells irradiated by 25-200 J/m(2) UVC. Our results indicate that an early response to DNA damage caused by UVC irradiation can be visualized by increased GFP-53BP1 focus formation by pancreatic cancer cells.
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A color-coded imaging model of the interaction of ?v integrin-GFP expressed in osteosarcoma cells and RFP expressing blood vessels in Gelfoam® vascularized in vivo.
Anticancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2013
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The integrin family of proteins has been shown to be involved in the malignant behavior of cells. We report here development of a color-coded imaging model that can visualize the interaction between ?v integrin linked to green fluorescent protein (GFP) in osteosarcoma cells and blood vessels in Gelfoam® vascularized after implantation in red fluorescent protein (RFP) transgenic nude mice. Human 143B osteosarcoma cells expressing ?v integrin-GFP were generated by transfection with an ?v integrin-GFP vector. Gelfoam® (5×5 mm) was transplanted subcutaneously in transgenic RFP nude mice. The implanted Gelfoam® became highly vascularized with RFP vessels within 14 days. Skin flaps were made at days 7, 14, 21, 28 after transplantation of Gelfoam® for observing vascularization of the Gelfoam® using fluorescence imaging. Gelfoam® is a useful tool to observe angiogenesis in vivo. 143B cells (5 × 10(5)) expressing ?v integrin-GFP were injected into the Gelfoam® seven days after transplantation of Gelfoam®. Seven days after cancer-cell injection, cancer cells and blood vessels were observed in the Gelfoam® by color-coded confocal microscopy via the skin flap. The 143B cells expressing ?v integrin-GFP proliferated into the Gelfoam®, which contained RFP-expressing blood vessels. Strong expression of ?v integrin-GFP in 143B cells was observed near RFP vessels in the Gelfoam®. The observation of the behavior of ?v integrin-GFP and blood vessels will allow further understanding of the role of ?v integrin in cancer cells.
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Dynamic color-coded fluorescence imaging of the cell-cycle phase, mitosis, and apoptosis demonstrates how caffeine modulates cisplatinum efficacy.
J. Cell. Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2013
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Caffeine enhances the effect of certain anticancer drugs, but the mechanism of modulation is poorly understood. In this study, modulation of cisplatinum efficacy induced by caffeine was visualized at the subcellular level by real-time fluorescent-protein imaging. Mitotic and apoptotic changes were observed by imaging 143B human osteosarcoma dual-color cells, in which GFP is expressed in the nucleus and RFP is expressed in the cytoplasm. Modulation of the cell cycle was imaged using time-lapse imaging of HeLa cells expressing a fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (FUCCI) in the nucleus. Clonogenic assays showed that caffeine increased the inhibition by cisplatinum on cell proliferation. Subcellular imaging demonstrated that cisplatinum decreased mitosis and induced apoptosis in 143B cells. The combination of cisplatinum and caffeine enhanced mitosis and subsequently increased apoptosis. Time-lapse imaging showed that cisplatinum strongly induced cell-cycle arrest in the S/G2 phase in HeLa-FUCCI cells. Caffeine overcame the cell-cycle arrest induced by cisplatinum, thereby increasing its efficacy, since cisplatinum is ineffective against quiescent cells. The data in this report indicate that caffeine modulates the cell cycle in cancer cells, thereby enhancing efficacy of cell-cycle-dependent anticancer drugs such as cisplatinum.
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Nestin-Expressing Stem Cells Promote Nerve Growth in Long-Term 3-Dimensional Gelfoam®-Supported Histoculture.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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We have previously reported that hair follicles contain multipotent stem cells which express nestin. The nestin-expressing cells form the hair follicle sensory nerve. In vitro, the nestin-expressing hair follicle cells can differentiate into neurons, Schwann cells, and other cell types. In the present study, the sciatic nerve was excised from transgenic mice in which the nestin promoter drives green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP mice). The ND-GFP cells of the sciatic nerve were also found to be multipotent as the ND-GFP cells in the hair follicle. When the ND-GFP cells in the mouse sciatic nerve cultured on Gelfoam® and were imaged by confocal microscopy, they were observed forming fibers extending the nerve. The fibers consisted of ND-GFP-expressing spindle cells, which co-expressed the neuron marker ?-III tubulin, the immature Schwann-cell marker p75(NTR) and TrkB which is associated with neurons. The fibers also contain nestin-negative spherical cells expressing GFAP, a Schwann-cell marker. The ?-III tubulin-positive fibers had growth cones on their tips expressing F-actin, indicating they are growing axons. When the sciatic nerve from mice ubiquitously expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) was co-cultured on Gelfoam® with the sciatic nerve from ND-GFP transgenic mice, the interaction of nerves was observed. Proliferating nestin-expressing cells in the injured sciatic nerve were also observed in vivo. Nestin-expressing cells were also observed in posterior nerves but not in the spinal cord itself, when placed in 3-D Gelfoam® culture. The results of the present report suggest a critical function of nestin-expressing cells in peripheral nerve growth and regeneration.
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Preclinical evaluation of telomerase-specific oncolytic virotherapy for human bone and soft tissue sarcomas.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2011
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Tumor-specific replication-selective oncolytic virotherapy is a promising antitumor therapy for induction of cell death in tumor cells but not of normal cells. We previously developed an oncolytic adenovirus, OBP-301, that kills human epithelial malignant cells in a telomerase-dependent manner. Recent evidence suggests that nonepithelial malignant cells, which have low telomerase activity, maintain telomere length through alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT). However, it remains unclear whether OBP-301 is cytopathic for nonepithelial malignant cells. Here, we evaluated the antitumor effect of OBP-301 on human bone and soft tissue sarcoma cells.
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Telomerase-dependent oncolytic adenovirus sensitizes human cancer cells to ionizing radiation via inhibition of DNA repair machinery.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 11-02-2010
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The inability to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) leads to radiosensitization, such that ionizing radiation combined with molecular inhibition of cellular DSB processing may greatly affect treatment of human cancer. As a variety of viral products interact with the DNA repair machinery, oncolytic virotherapy may improve the therapeutic window of conventional radiotherapy. Here, we describe the mechanistic basis for synergy of irradiation and OBP-301 (Telomelysin), an attenuated type-5 adenovirus with oncolytic potency that contains the human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter to regulate viral replication. OBP-301 infection led to E1B55kDa viral protein expression that degraded the complex formed by Mre11, Rad50, and NBS1, which senses DSBs. Subsequently, the phosphorylation of cellular ataxia-telangiectasia mutated protein was inhibited, disrupting the signaling pathway controlling DNA repair. Thus, tumor cells infected with OBP-301 could be rendered sensitive to ionizing radiation. Moreover, by using noninvasive whole-body imaging, we showed that intratumoral injection of OBP-301 followed by regional irradiation induces a substantial antitumor effect, resulting from tumor cell-specific radiosensitization, in an orthotopic human esophageal cancer xenograft model. These results illustrate the potential of combining oncolytic virotherapy and ionizing radiation as a promising strategy in the management of human cancer.
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In vivo biological purging for lymph node metastasis of human colorectal cancer by telomerase-specific oncolytic virotherapy.
Ann. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2010
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The aim of this study was to develop a less invasive way of targeting lymph node metastasis for the treatment of human gastrointestinal cancer. Lymphatic invasion is a major route for cancer cell dissemination, and adequate treatment of locoregional lymph nodes is required for curative treatment in patients with malignancies.
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Real-time imaging of apoptosis induction of human breast cancer cells by the traditional Chinese medicinal herb tubeimu.
Anticancer Res.
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Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has been used for thousands of years, including treatment for cancer. Use of modern technology and the scientific method to evaluate the efficacy of TCM for cancer should enable its more widespread use. In the present study, the efficacy of the TCM tubeimu, extracted from the tuber of the plant Bolbostemma paniculatum, on the MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line was evaluated. The MDA-MB-231 cell line was engineered to express red fluorescent protein (RFP) in the cytoplasm and green fluorescent protein (GFP) linked to histone H2B in the nucleus, which allows real-time imaging of nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics. Apoptosis was readily visualized in these cells by nuclear shape changes and fragmentation. The MDA-MB-231 RFP-GFP cells were cultured either in two-dimensions on plastic or in three-dimensions on Gelfoam®. Cells were treated with a dichloromethane extract of fresh tubeimu. Apoptosis was further monitored by DNA fragmentation determined by gel electrophoresis. Tubeimu induced apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells, as observed by fluorescence microscopy, as early as 24 hours of treatment in vitro in two-dimensional culture. By 48 hours treatment, DNA fragmentation could be observed. The frequency of apoptosis increased through at least 72 hours treatment, with most of the cells being killed. Tubeimu also induced apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells in three-dimensional culture on Gelfoam®, but to a lesser extent than in 2D culture. The results of the present study indicate the potential of tubeimu in breast cancer therapy.
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The hTERT promoter enhances the antitumor activity of an oncolytic adenovirus under a hypoxic microenvironment.
PLoS ONE
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Hypoxia is a microenvironmental factor that contributes to the invasion, progression and metastasis of tumor cells. Hypoxic tumor cells often show more resistance to conventional chemoradiotherapy than normoxic tumor cells, suggesting the requirement of novel antitumor therapies to efficiently eliminate the hypoxic tumor cells. We previously generated a tumor-specific replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus (OBP-301: Telomelysin), in which the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter drives viral E1 expression. Since the promoter activity of the hTERT gene has been shown to be upregulated by hypoxia, we hypothesized that, under hypoxic conditions, the antitumor effect of OBP-301 with the hTERT promoter would be more efficient than that of the wild-type adenovirus 5 (Ad5). In this study, we investigated the antitumor effects of OBP-301 and Ad5 against human cancer cells under a normoxic (20% oxygen) or a hypoxic (1% oxygen) condition. Hypoxic condition induced nuclear accumulation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1? and upregulation of hTERT promoter activity in human cancer cells. The cytopathic activity of OBP-301 was significantly higher than that of Ad5 under hypoxic condition. Consistent with their cytopathic activity, the replication of OBP-301 was significantly higher than that of Ad5 under the hypoxic condition. OBP-301-mediated E1A was expressed within hypoxic areas of human xenograft tumors in mice. These results suggest that the cytopathic activity of OBP-301 against hypoxic tumor cells is mediated through hypoxia-mediated activation of the hTERT promoter. Regulation of oncolytic adenoviruses by the hTERT promoter is a promising antitumor strategy, not only for induction of tumor-specific oncolysis, but also for efficient elimination of hypoxic tumor cells.
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Genetically engineered oncolytic adenovirus induces autophagic cell death through an E2F1-microRNA-7-epidermal growth factor receptor axis.
Int. J. Cancer
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Autophagy is known to have a cytoprotective role under various cellular stresses; however, it also results in robust cell death as an important safeguard mechanism that protects the organism against invading pathogens and unwanted cancer cells. Autophagy is regulated by cell signalling including microRNA (miRNA), a post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression. Here, we show that genetically engineered telomerase-specific oncolytic adenovirus induced miR-7 expression, which is significantly associated with its cytopathic activity in human cancer cells. Virus-mediated miR-7 upregulation depended on enhanced expression of the E2F1 protein. Ectopic expression of miR-7 suppressed cell viability and induced autophagy by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression. Our results suggest that oncolytic adenovirus induces autophagic cell death through an E2F1-miR-7-EGFR pathway in human cancer cells, providing a novel insight into the molecular mechanism of an anticancer virotherapy.
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Mechanism of resistance to trastuzumab and molecular sensitization via ADCC activation by exogenous expression of HER2-extracellular domain in human cancer cells.
Cancer Immunol. Immunother.
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Trastuzumab, a humanized antibody targeting HER2, exhibits remarkable therapeutic efficacy against HER2-positive breast and gastric cancers; however, acquired resistance presents a formidable obstacle to long-term tumor responses in the majority of patients. Here, we show the mechanism of resistance to trastuzumab in HER2-positive human cancer cells and explore the molecular sensitization by exogenous expression of HER2-extracellular domain (ECD) in HER2-negative or trastuzumab-resistant human cancer cells. We found that long-term exposure to trastuzumab induced resistance in HER2-positive cancer cells; HER2 expression was downregulated, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity was impaired. We next examined the hypothesis that trastuzumab-resistant cells could be re-sensitized by the transfer of non-functional HER2-ECD. Exogenous HER2-ECD expression induced by the stable transfection of a plasmid vector or infection with a replication-deficient adenovirus vector had no apparent effect on the signaling pathway, but strongly enhanced ADCC activity in low HER2-expressing or trastuzumab-resistant human cancer cells. Our data indicate that restoration of HER2-ECD expression sensitizes HER2-negative or HER2-downregulated human cancer cells to trastuzumab-mediated ADCC, an outcome that has important implications for the treatment of human cancers.
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A novel apoptotic mechanism of genetically engineered adenovirus-mediated tumour-specific p53 overexpression through E1A-dependent p21 and MDM2 suppression.
Eur. J. Cancer
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Oncolytic viruses engineered to replicate in tumour cells but not in normal cells could be used as tumour-specific vectors carrying the therapeutic genes. We previously developed a telomerase-specific oncolytic adenovirus, OBP-301, that causes cell death in human cancer cells with telomerase activities. Here, we further modified OBP-301 to express the wild-type p53 tumour suppressor gene (OBP-702), and investigated whether OBP-702 induces stronger antitumour activity than OBP-301. The antitumour effect of OBP-702 was compared to that of OBP-301 on OBP-301-sensitive (H358 and H460) and OBP-301-resistant (T.Tn and HSC4) human cancer cells. OBP-702 suppressed the viability of both OBP-301-sensitive and OBP-301-resistant cancer cells more efficiently than OBP-301. OBP-702 caused increased apoptosis compared to OBP-301 or a replication-deficient adenovirus expressing the p53 gene (Ad-p53) in H358 and T.Tn cells. Adenovirus E1A-mediated p21 and MDM2 downregulation was involved in the apoptosis caused by OBP-702. Moreover, OBP-702 significantly suppressed tumour growth in subcutaneous tumour xenograft models compared to monotherapy with OBP-301 or Ad-p53. Our data demonstrated that OBP-702 infection expressed adenovirus E1A and then inhibited p21 and MDM2 expression, which in turn efficiently induced apoptotic cell death. This novel apoptotic mechanism suggests that the p53-expressing OBP-702 is a promising antitumour reagent for human cancer and could improve the clinical outcome.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.