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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Associations between nocturnal blood pressure dipping and the metabolic syndrome in high- vs. low-acculturated Mexican American women.
Am. J. Hypertens.
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2013
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Less nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipping has been associated with greater odds for the metabolic syndrome (MetS), a constellation of risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Little work has examined this association in Hispanics, who have elevated rates of MetS, or investigated differences in this relationship by level of acculturation. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between BP dipping and MetS in Hispanic women and to determine if this association is moderated by acculturation status.
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Socioeconomic status, psychosocial resources and risk, and cardiometabolic risk in Mexican-American women.
Health Psychol
PUBLISHED: 11-07-2011
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The current study examined the contributions of psychosocial factors to the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) risk, in a randomly selected community cohort of 304 middle-aged (40-65 years old) Mexican-American women, a population at elevated cardiometabolic risk.
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Domains of chronic stress, lifestyle factors, and allostatic load in middle-aged Mexican-American women.
Ann Behav Med
PUBLISHED: 05-11-2011
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Little research has examined how chronic stress in different domains relates to allostatic load (AL).
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The association between chronic stress type and C-reactive protein in the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis: does gender make a difference?
J Behav Med
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2011
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The objective of this study is to examine how chronic stress in major life domains [relationship, work, sympathetic-caregiving, financial] relates to CVD risk, operationalized using the inflammatory marker C-Reactive Protein (CRP), and whether gender differences exist. Participants were 6,583 individuals aged 45-84 years, recruited as part of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Demographic and behavioral factors, health history, and chronic stress were self-reported. CRP was obtained through venous blood draw. In aggregate, gender by chronic stress interaction effects accounted for a significant, albeit small, amount of variance in CRP (P < .01). The sympathetic-caregiving stress by gender interaction was significant (P < .01); the work stress by gender effect approached significance (P = .05). Women with sympathetic-caregiving stress had higher CRP than those without, whereas no difference in CRP by stress group was observed for men. Findings underscore the importance of considering gender as an effect modifier in analyses of stress-CVD risk relationships.
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Socioeconomic Status and Health: What is the role of Reserve Capacity?
Curr Dir Psychol Sci
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2009
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A robust, linear association between socioeconomic status (SES) and health has been identified across many populations and endpoints. This relationship is typically monotonic, so that each step down the SES hierarchy brings increased vulnerability to disease and premature mortality. Despite growing attention to health disparities, scientists and policy makers have made little progress toward confronting their causes and implementing effective solutions. Using the Reserve Capacity Model (Gallo & Matthews, 2003) as an organizing framework, the current article examines the contribution of resilient psychosocial resources to socioeconomic disparities in physical health. Findings suggest that deficient psychosocial resources, such as low perceptions of control and social support, may be one of many factors that connect low SES with poor health. Additional research is needed to test these relationships and their underlying mechanisms, to consider interventions to enhance reserve capacity, and to evaluate the efficacy of such efforts in fostering resilience to socioeconomic hardship.
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Associations between socioeconomic status and catecholamine levels vary by acculturation status in Mexican-American women.
Ann Behav Med
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Lower socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with poorer health, possibly through activation of the sympathetic nervous system.
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Socioeconomic status and stress in Mexican-American women: a multi-method perspective.
J Behav Med
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Stress is a hypothesized pathway in socioeconomic status (SES)-physical health associations, but the available empirical data are inconsistent. In part, this may reflect discrepancies in the approach to measuring stress across studies, and differences in the nature of SES-stress associations across demographic groups. We examined associations of SES (education, income) with general and domain-specific chronic stressors, stressful life events, perceived stress, and stressful daily experiences in 318 Mexican-American women (40-65 years old). Women with higher SES reported lower perceived stress and fewer low-control experiences in everyday life (ps < .05), but greater chronic stress (education only, p < .05). Domain-specific analyses showed negative associations of income with chronic housing and financial stress (ps < .05), but positive associations of SES with chronic work and caregiving stress (all ps < .05 except for income and caregiving stress, p < .10). Sensitivity analyses showed that most SES-stress associations were consistent across acculturation levels. Future research should adopt a multi-dimensional assessment approach to better understand links among SES, stress, and physical health, and should consider the sociodemographic context in conceptualizing the role of stress in SES-related health inequalities.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.