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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
B?(15-42) attenuates the effect of ischemia-reperfusion injury in renal transplantation.
J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 08-12-2011
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Renal ischemia-reperfusion contributes to reduced renal allograft survival. The peptide B?(15-42), a breakdown product of fibrin, attenuates inflammation induced by ischemia-reperfusion in the heart by competitively blocking the binding of leukocytes to endothelial VE-cadherin, but whether it could improve outcomes in renal transplantation is unknown. Here, we tested the ability of B?(15-42) to ameliorate the effects of renal ischemic injury during allogenic kidney transplantation in mice. In our renal transplantation model (C57BL/6 into BALB/c mice), treatment with B?(15-42) at the time of allograft reperfusion resulted in significantly improved survival of recipients during the 28-day follow-up (60% versus 10%). B?(15-42) treatment decreased leukocyte infiltration, expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, and proinflammatory cytokines. Treatment significantly attenuated allogenic T cell activation and reduced cellular rejection. Moreover, B?(15-42) significantly reduced tubular epithelial damage and apoptosis, which we reproduced in vitro. These data suggest that B?(15-42) may have therapeutic potential in transplant surgery by protecting grafts from ischemia-reperfusion injury.
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Bbeta(15-42) protects against acid-induced acute lung injury and secondary pseudomonas pneumonia in vivo.
Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med.
PUBLISHED: 09-17-2009
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Acute lung injury (ALI) is a serious condition in critically ill patients that predisposes to secondary bacterial pneumonia. Vascular leak is a hallmark in the pathogenesis of ALI. The fibrin-derived peptide Bbeta(15-42) was shown to preserve endothelial barriers, thereby reducing vascular leak. The potential therapeutic role of Bbeta(15-42) in ALI has not been addressed so far.
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Peptide Bbeta(15-42) preserves endothelial barrier function in shock.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2009
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Loss of vascular barrier function causes leak of fluid and proteins into tissues, extensive leak leads to shock and death. Barriers are largely formed by endothelial cell-cell contacts built up by VE-cadherin and are under the control of RhoGTPases. Here we show that a natural plasmin digest product of fibrin, peptide Bbeta15-42 (also called FX06), significantly reduces vascular leak and mortality in animal models for Dengue shock syndrome. The ability of Bbeta15-42 to preserve endothelial barriers is confirmed in rats i.v.-injected with LPS. In endothelial cells, Bbeta15-42 prevents thrombin-induced stress fiber formation, myosin light chain phosphorylation and RhoA activation. The molecular key for the protective effect of Bbeta15-42 is the src kinase Fyn, which associates with VE-cadherin-containing junctions. Following exposure to Bbeta15-42 Fyn dissociates from VE-cadherin and associates with p190RhoGAP, a known antagonists of RhoA activation. The role of Fyn in transducing effects of Bbeta15-42 is confirmed in Fyn(-/-) mice, where the peptide is unable to reduce LPS-induced lung edema, whereas in wild type littermates the peptide significantly reduces leak. Our results demonstrate a novel function for Bbeta15-42. Formerly mainly considered as a degradation product occurring after fibrin inactivation, it has now to be considered as a signaling molecule. It stabilizes endothelial barriers and thus could be an attractive adjuvant in the treatment of shock.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.