JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Regulatory T Cell DNA Methyltransferase Inhibition Accelerates Resolution of Lung Inflammation.
Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 10-09-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common and oftentimes fatal inflammatory lung condition without effective targeted therapies. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) resolve lung inflammation, but mechanisms that enhance Tregs to promote resolution of established damage remain unknown. DNA demethylation at the forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) locus and other key Treg loci typify the Treg lineage. To test how dynamic DNA demethylation affects lung injury resolution, we administered the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC) to wild type mice beginning 24 hours after intratracheal lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury. Mice that received DAC exhibited accelerated resolution of their injury. Lung CD4(+)CD25(hi)Foxp3(+) Tregs from DAC-treated wild type mice increased in number and displayed enhanced Foxp3 expression, activation state, suppressive phenotype, and proliferative capacity. Lymphocyte-deficient recombinase activating gene-1-null (Rag-1(-/-)) mice and Treg-depleted (diphtheria toxin-treated Foxp3(DTR)) mice did not resolve their injury in response to DAC. Adoptive transfer of 200,000 DAC-treated, but not vehicle-treated, exogenous Tregs rescued Treg-deficient mice from ongoing lung inflammation. Additionally, in wild type mice with influenza-induced lung inflammation, DAC rescue treatment facilitated recovery of their injury and promoted an increase in lung Treg number. Thus, DNA methyltransferase inhibition, at least in part, augments Treg number and function to accelerate repair of experimental lung injury. Epigenetic pathways represent novel manipulable targets for the treatment of ARDS.
Related JoVE Video
Epigenetic DNA Methylation of Antioxidative Stress Regulator NRF2 in Human Prostate Cancer.
Cancer Prev Res (Phila)
PUBLISHED: 09-29-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Epigenetic control of NRF2, a master regulator of many critical antioxidative stress defense genes in human prostate cancer (CaP), is unknown. Our previous animal study found decreased Nrf2 expression through promoter CpG methylation/histone modifications during prostate cancer progression in TRAMP mice. In this study, we evaluated CpG methylation of human NRF2 promoter in 27 clinical prostate cancer samples and in LNCaP cells using MAQMA analysis and bisulfite genomic DNA sequencing. Prostate cancer tissue microarray (TMA) containing normal and prostate cancer tissues was studied by immunohistochemistry. Luciferase reporter assay using specific human NRF2 DNA promoter segments and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay against histone modifying proteins were performed in LNCaP cells. Three specific CpG sites in the NRF2 promoter were found to be hypermethylated in clinical prostate cancer samples (BPH
Related JoVE Video
Clinical validation of KRAS, BRAF, and EGFR mutation detection using next-generation sequencing.
Am. J. Clin. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To validate next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology for clinical diagnosis and to determine appropriate read depth.
Related JoVE Video
Key tumor suppressor genes inactivated by "greater promoter" methylation and somatic mutations in head and neck cancer.
Epigenetics
PUBLISHED: 05-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) are commonly inactivated by somatic mutation and/or promoter methylation; yet, recent high-throughput genomic studies have not identified key TSGs inactivated by both mechanisms. We pursued an integrated molecular analysis based on methylation binding domain sequencing (MBD-seq), 450K Methylation arrays, whole exome sequencing, and whole genome gene expression arrays in primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors and matched uvulopalatopharyngoplasty tissue samples (UPPPs). We uncovered 186 downregulated genes harboring cancer specific promoter methylation including PAX1 and PAX5 and we identified 10 key tumor suppressor genes (GABRB3, HOXC12, PARP15, SLCO4C1, CDKN2A, PAX1, PIK3AP1, HOXC6, PLCB1, and ZIC4) inactivated by both promoter methylation and/or somatic mutation. Among the novel tumor suppressor genes discovered with dual mechanisms of inactivation, we found a high frequency of genomic and epigenomic alterations in the PAX gene family of transcription factors, which selectively impact canonical NOTCH and TP53 pathways to determine cell fate, cell survival, and genome maintenance. Our results highlight the importance of assessing TSGs at the genomic and epigenomic level to identify key pathways in HNSCC, deregulated by simultaneous promoter methylation and somatic mutations.
Related JoVE Video
Prostate adenocarcinomas aberrantly expressing p63 are molecularly distinct from usual-type prostatic adenocarcinomas.
Mod. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 04-28-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We have described a rare group of prostate adenocarcinomas that show aberrant expression of p63, a protein strongly expressed in prostatic basal cells and absent from usual-type acinar prostate cancers. The partial basal-like immunophenotype of these tumors is intriguing in light of the persistent debate surrounding the cell-of-origin for prostate cancer; however, their molecular phenotype is unknown. We collected 37 of these tumors on radical prostatectomy and biopsy and assessed subsets for a diverse panel of molecular markers. The majority of p63-expressing tumors were positive for the ?Np63 isoform (6/7) by immunofluorescence and p63 mRNA (7/8) by chromogenic in situ hybridization. Despite p63 positivity, these tumors uniformly expressed luminal-type cytokeratin proteins such as CK18 (13/13), CK8 (8/8), and markers of androgen axis signaling commonly seen in luminal cells, including androgen receptor (10/11), NKX3.1 (8/8), and prostein (12/13). Conversely, basal cytokeratins such as CK14 and CK15 were negative in all cases (0/8) and CK5/6 was weakly and focally positive in 36% (4/11) of cases. Pluripotency markers including ?-catenin, Oct4, and c-kit were negative in p63-expressing tumors (0/11). Despite nearly universal expression of androgen receptor and downstream androgen signaling targets, p63-expressing tumors lacked ERG rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridization (0/14) and ERG protein expression (0/37). No tumors expressed SPINK1 or showed PTEN protein loss (0/19). Surprisingly, 74% (14/19) of p63-expressing tumors expressed GSTP1 protein at least focally, and 33% (2/6) entirely lacked GSTP1 CpG island hypermethylation by bisulfite sequencing. In contrast to usual prostatic adenocarcinomas, prostate tumors with p63 expression show a mixed luminal/basal immunophenotype, uniformly lack ERG gene rearrangement, and frequently express GSTP1. These data strongly suggest that p63-expressing prostate tumors represent a molecularly distinct subclass and further study of this rare tumor type may yield important insights into the role of p63 in prostatic biology and the prostate cancer cell-of-origin.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 12 September 2014; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2014.115.
Related JoVE Video
Methylation of the PMEPA1 gene, a negative regulator of the androgen receptor in prostate cancer.
Epigenetics
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The prostate transmembrane protein androgen induced 1 (PMEPA1) gene is highly expressed in prostate epithelial cells and is a direct transcriptional target for the androgen receptor (AR). AR protein levels are controlled by the AR-PMEPA1 negative feedback loop through NEDD4-E3 ligase. Reduced expression of PMEPA1 observed in prostate tumors, suggests that loss of PMEPA1 may play critical roles in prostate tumorigenesis. This study focuses on epigenetic mechanisms of reduced PMEPA1 expression in the cancer of the prostate (CaP). Benign (n = 77) and matched malignant (n = 77) prostate epithelial cells were laser capture micro-dissected from optimum cutting temperature embedded frozen prostate sections from 42 Caucasian American (CA) and 35 African American (AA) cases. Purified DNA specimens were analyzed for CpG methylation of the PMEPA1 gene. PMEPA1 mRNA expression levels were evaluated by qRT-PCR. Analysis of PMEPA1 methylation and mRNA expression in the same tumor cell populations indicated a significant inverse correlation between mRNA expression and methylation in CaP (P = 0.0115). We noted higher frequency of CpG methylation within the evaluated first intronic region of the PMEPA1 gene in prostate tumors of CA men as compared with AA. In CaP cell lines, PMEPA1 expression was induced and AR protein levels were diminished in response to treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine). Cell culture-based studies demonstrated that decitabine restores PMEPA1 expression in AR-positive CaP cell lines. This report reveals the potential role of PMEPA1 gene methylation in the regulation of AR stability. Thus, downregulation of PMEPA1 may result in increased AR protein levels and function in CaP cells, contributing to prostate tumorigenesis.
Related JoVE Video
The diet as a cause of human prostate cancer.
Cancer Treat. Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Asymptomatic prostate inflammation and prostate cancer have reached epidemic proportions among men in the developed world. Animal model studies implicate dietary carcinogens, such as the heterocyclic amines from over-cooked meats and sex steroid hormones, particularly estrogens, as candidate etiologies for prostate cancer. Each acts by causing epithelial cell damage, triggering an inflammatory response that can evolve into a chronic or recurrent condition. This milieu appears to spawn proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA) lesions, a type of focal atrophy that represents the earliest of prostate cancer precursor lesions. Rare PIA lesions contain cells which exhibit high c-Myc expression, shortened telomere segments, and epigenetic silencing of genes such as GSTP1, encoding the ?-class glutathione S-transferase, all characteristic of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and prostate cancer. Subsequent genetic changes, such as the gene translocations/deletions that generate fusion transcripts between androgen-regulated genes (such as TMPRSS2) and genes encoding ETS family transcription factors (such as ERG1), arise in PIN lesions and may promote invasiveness characteristic of prostatic adenocarcinoma cells. Lethal prostate cancers contain markedly corrupted genomes and epigenomes. Epigenetic silencing, which seems to arise in response to the inflamed microenvironment generated by dietary carcinogens and/or estrogens as part of an epigenetic "catastrophe" affecting hundreds of genes, persists to drive clonal evolution through metastatic dissemination. The cause of the initial epigenetic "catastrophe" has not been determined but likely involves defective chromatin structure maintenance by over-exuberant DNA methylation or histone modification. With dietary carcinogens and estrogens driving pro-carcinogenic inflammation in the developed world, it is tempting to speculate that dietary components associated with decreased prostate cancer risk, such as intake of fruits and vegetables, especially tomatoes and crucifers, might act to attenuate the ravages of the chronic or recurrent inflammatory processes. Specifically, nutritional agents might prevent PIA lesions or reduce the propensity of PIA lesions to suffer "catastrophic" epigenome corruption.
Related JoVE Video
Time-Resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Assay for Discovery of Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Methyl-CpG Binding Domain Protein 2.
J Biomol Screen
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Methylated DNA binding proteins such as Methyl-CpG Binding Domain Protein 2 (MBD2) can transduce DNA methylation alterations into a repressive signal by recruiting transcriptional co-repressor complexes. Interfering with MBD2 could lead to reactivation of tumor suppressor genes and therefore represents an attractive strategy for epigenetic therapy. We developed and compared fluorescence polarization (FP) and time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET)-based high-throughput screening (HTS) assays to identify small-molecule inhibitors of the interaction between the methyl binding domain of MBD2 (MBD2-MBD) and methylated DNA. Although both assays performed well in 96-well format, the TR-FRET assay (Z' factor = 0.58) emerged as a superior screening strategy compared with FP (Z' factor = 0.08) when evaluated in an HTS 384-well plate format. Using TR-FRET, we screened the Sigma LOPAC library for MBD2-MBD inhibitors and identified four compounds that also validated in a dose-response series. This included two known DNA intercalators (mitoxantrone and idarubicin) among two other inhibitory compounds (NF449 and aurintricarboxylic acid). All four compounds also inhibited the binding of SP-1, a transcription factor with a GC-rich binding sequence, to a methylated oligonucleotide, demonstrating that the activity was nonspecific. Our results provide proof of principle for using TR-FRET-based HTS to identify small-molecule inhibitors of MBD2 and other DNA-protein interactions.
Related JoVE Video
RNA-Seq of the nucleolus reveals abundant SNORD44-derived small RNAs.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Small non-coding RNAs represent RNA species that are not translated to proteins, but which have diverse and broad functional activities in physiological and pathophysiological states. The knowledge of these small RNAs is rapidly expanding in part through the use of massive parallel (deep) sequencing efforts. We present here the first deep sequencing of small RNomes in subcellular compartments with particular emphasis on small RNAs (sRNA) associated with the nucleolus. The vast majority of the cellular, cytoplasmic and nuclear sRNAs were identified as miRNAs. In contrast, the nucleolar sRNAs had a unique size distribution consisting of 19-20 and 25 nt RNAs, which were predominantly composed of small snoRNA-derived box C/D RNAs (termed as sdRNA). Sequences from 47 sdRNAs were identified, which mapped to both 5' and 3' ends of the snoRNAs, and retained conserved box C or D motifs. SdRNA reads mapping to SNORD44 comprised 74% of all nucleolar sdRNAs, and were confirmed by Northern blotting as comprising both 20 and 25 nt RNAs. A novel 120 nt SNORD44 form was also identified. The expression of the SNORD44 sdRNA and 120 nt form was independent of Dicer/Drosha-mediated processing pathways but was dependent on the box C/D snoRNP proteins/sno-ribonucleoproteins fibrillarin and NOP58. The 120 nt SNORD44-derived RNA bound to fibrillarin suggesting that C/D sno-ribonucleoproteins are involved in regulating the stability or processing of SNORD44. This study reveals sRNA cell-compartment specific expression and the distinctive unique composition of the nucleolar sRNAs.
Related JoVE Video
Regulation of human hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal by the microenvironments control of retinoic acid signaling.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The high expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1, also known as retinaldehyde dehydrogenase, by hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) suggests an important role for retinoic acid (RA) signaling in determining the fate of these cells. We found that primitive human bone marrow-derived CD34(+)CD38(-) cells not only highly express aldehyde dehydrogenase 1, but also the RA receptor ?. Despite the up-regulation of early components of RA signaling, the downstream pathway remained inactive in the primitive CD34(+)CD38(-) cells. Primitive hematopoietic cells rapidly undergo terminal differentiation when cultured away from their microenvironment; however, we found that inhibition of RA signaling maintained their primitive phenotype and function, and promoted their self-renewal. HSCs reside in a complex microenvironment that enforces the balance between self-renewal and differentiation. The exact physiologic mechanisms by which the niche controls HSC fate remain elusive. The embryonic gonadal microenvironment has recently been shown to determine germ-cell fate by degrading RA through expression of the P450 retinoid-inactivating enzyme CYP26B1. We found that the bone marrow microenvironment similarly can control primitive hematopoietic cell fate via modulation of retinoid bioavailability. Accordingly, we found that bone marrow stromal cell CYP26 was also able to inactivate retinoids in serum, preventing RA signaling. Thus, primitive hematopoietic cells appear to be intrinsically programmed to undergo RA-mediated differentiation unless prevented from doing so by bone marrow niche CYP26. Modulation of RA signaling also holds promise for clinical HSC expansion, a prerequisite for the wide-scale use of these cells in regenerative medicine and gene therapy.
Related JoVE Video
Resistance emerges to second-generation antiandrogens in prostate cancer.
Cancer Discov
PUBLISHED: 09-11-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The appearance of a mutant androgen receptor, AR(F876L), in prostate cancer cells chronically exposed to enzalutamide or ARN-509 promotes a switch from antagonist to agonist receptor function, undermining the potential long-term effectiveness of these second-generation antiandrogen drugs.
Related JoVE Video
Explanatory chapter: next generation sequencing.
Meth. Enzymol.
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Technological breakthroughs in sequencing technologies have driven the advancement of molecular biology and molecular genetics research. The advent of high-throughput Sanger sequencing (for information on the method, see Sanger Dideoxy Sequencing of DNA) in the mid- to late-1990s made possible the accelerated completion of the human genome project, which has since revolutionized the pace of discovery in biomedical research. Similarly, the advent of next generation sequencing is poised to revolutionize biomedical research and usher a new era of individualized, rational medicine. The term next generation sequencing refers to technologies that have enabled the massively parallel analysis of DNA sequence facilitated through the convergence of advancements in molecular biology, nucleic acid chemistry and biochemistry, computational biology, and electrical and mechanical engineering. The current next generation sequencing technologies are capable of sequencing tens to hundreds of millions of DNA templates simultaneously and generate >4 gigabases of sequence in a single day. These technologies have largely started to replace high-throughput Sanger sequencing for large-scale genomic projects, and have created significant enthusiasm for the advent of a new era of individualized medicine.
Related JoVE Video
Preparation of fragment libraries for next-generation sequencing on the applied biosystems SOLiD platform.
Meth. Enzymol.
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The primary purpose of this protocol is to prepare genomic DNA libraries that can then be analyzed by massively parallel next-generation sequencing on the Applied Biosystems SOLiD platform. This protocol can be adapted to next-generation sequencing workflows to ultimately generate up to 1 billion 50 bp sequence tags from the ends of each of the DNA molecules in the library in a single next-generation sequencing run.
Related JoVE Video
Biobanking of derivatives from radical retropubic and robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy tissues as part of the prostate cancer biorepository network.
Prostate
PUBLISHED: 08-06-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The goal of the Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network (PCBN) is to develop a biorepository with high-quality, well-annotated specimens obtained in a systematic, reproducible fashion using optimized and standardized protocols, and an infrastructure to facilitate the growth of the resource and its wide usage by the prostate cancer research community. An emerging area of concern in the field of prostate cancer biobanking is an apparent shift in the proportion of surgical procedures performed for prostate cancer treatment from radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) to robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP). Our study aimed to determine the potential impact of the RALP procedure on the detection of known prostate cancer biomarkers, and the subsequent suitability of RALP-derived specimens for prostate cancer biomarker studies.
Related JoVE Video
Tight correlation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and Polycomb marks in health and disease.
Cell Cycle
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Modifications to DNA and histone tails represent key epigenetic marks involved in establishing and maintaining cell identity and can be dysregulated in human diseases, including cancer. Two such modifications, tri-methylation of lysine-27 on histone H3 (H3K27me3) mediated by the Polycomb complex and hydroxymethylation of cytosines on DNA, have recently been shown to be dynamically regulated during differentiation. Here, we show that global levels of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) and H3K27me3 are highly correlated across a variety of somatic tissues. In multiple hierarchically organized tissues, both marks showed almost identical cell-by-cell distribution patterns that exhibited a tight association with differentiation. In particular, tissue stem cell compartments were characterized by low levels of both marks, whereas differentiated cell compartments exhibited high levels of 5hmC and H3K27me3. This pattern of correlation between the two marks could be recapitulated in an in vitro model system of induced differentiation in prostate epithelial cells. While the correlation between 5hmC and H3K27me3 levels is also maintained in human cancers, the degree of correlation is reduced. These findings suggest a previously unappreciated link between 5hmC and H3K27me3 regulation that should be explored in future mechanistic studies.
Related JoVE Video
Genome-wide comparison of the transcriptomes of highly enriched normal and chronic myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cell populations.
Oncotarget
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The persistence leukemia stem cells (LSCs) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) despite tyrosine kinase inhibition (TKI) may explain relapse after TKI withdrawal. Here we performed genome-wide transcriptome analysis of highly refined CML and normal stem and progenitor cell populations to identify novel targets for the eradication of CML LSCs using exon microarrays. We identified 97 genes that were differentially expressed in CML versus normal stem and progenitor cells. These included cell surface genes significantly upregulated in CML LSCs: DPP4 (CD26), IL2RA (CD25), PTPRD, CACNA1D, IL1RAP, SLC4A4, and KCNK5. Further analyses of the LSCs revealed dysregulation of normal cellular processes, evidenced by alternative splicing of genes in key cancer signaling pathways such as p53 signaling (e.g. PERP, CDKN1A), kinase binding (e.g. DUSP12, MARCKS), and cell proliferation (MYCN, TIMELESS); downregulation of pro-differentiation and TGF-?/BMP signaling pathways; upregulation of oxidative metabolism and DNA repair pathways; and activation of inflammatory cytokines, including CCL2, and multiple oncogenes (e.g., CCND1). These data represent an important resource for understanding the molecular changes in CML LSCs, which may be exploited to develop novel therapies for eradication these cells and achieve cure.
Related JoVE Video
Telomere phenotypes in females with heterozygous mutations in the dyskeratosis congenita 1 (DKC1) gene.
Hum. Mutat.
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is a telomere-mediated syndrome defined by mucocutaneous features. The X-linked mode of inheritance accounts for half the cases, and is thought to predominantly manifest in childhood as bone marrow failure. We identified two male probands who presented in the fifth decade with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and cancer. Their pedigrees displayed consecutively affected generations. Five of six females (83%) manifested mucocutaneous features of DC, and two had wound-healing complications. No mutations in autosomal dominant telomere genes were present, but exome sequencing revealed novel variants in the X-chromosome DKC1 gene that predicted missense mutations in conserved residues, p.Thr49Ser and p.Pro409Arg. Variants segregated with the telomere phenotype, and affected females were heterozygotes, showing skewed X-inactivation. Telomerase RNA levels were compromised in cells from DKC1 mutation carriers, consistent with their pathogenic role. These findings indicate that females with heterozygous DKC1 mutations may be at increased risk for developing penetrant telomere phenotypes that, at times, may be associated with clinical morbidity.
Related JoVE Video
Tracking the clonal origin of lethal prostate cancer.
J. Clin. Invest.
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Recent controversies surrounding prostate cancer overtreatment emphasize the critical need to delineate the molecular features associated with progression to lethal metastatic disease. Here, we have used whole-genome sequencing and molecular pathological analyses to characterize the lethal cell clone in a patient who died of prostate cancer. We tracked the evolution of the lethal cell clone from the primary cancer to metastases through samples collected during disease progression and at the time of death. Surprisingly, these analyses revealed that the lethal clone arose from a small, relatively low-grade cancer focus in the primary tumor, and not from the bulk, higher-grade primary cancer or from a lymph node metastasis resected at prostatectomy. Despite being limited to one case, these findings highlight the potential importance of developing and implementing molecular prognostic and predictive markers, such as alterations of tumor suppressor proteins PTEN or p53, to augment current pathological evaluation and delineate clonal heterogeneity. Furthermore, this case illustrates the potential need in precision medicine to longitudinally sample metastatic lesions to capture the evolving constellation of alterations during progression. Similar comprehensive studies of additional prostate cancer cases are warranted to understand the extent to which these issues may challenge prostate cancer clinical management.
Related JoVE Video
Aiming for the outliers: cancer precision medicine through targeting kinases with extreme expression.
Cancer Discov
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
With the increasing availability of highly potent, pharmacologically active, and selective protein kinase inhibitors, identification of individuals who would benefit from targeted kinase inhibitors could facilitate application of precision medicine strategies for cancer therapy. A recent study by Kothari and colleagues reports preclinical studies that highlight the potential of targeting kinases with extreme expression for cancer precision medicine, warranting further clinical investigation of an individual-specific outlier kinase targeting approach.
Related JoVE Video
Nucleotide resolution analysis of TMPRSS2 and ERG rearrangements in prostate cancer.
J. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangements occur in approximately 50% of prostate cancers and therefore represent one of the most frequently observed structural rearrangements in all cancers. However, little is known about the genomic architecture of such rearrangements. We therefore designed and optimized a pipeline involving target capture of TMPRSS2 and ERG genomic sequences coupled with paired-end next-generation sequencing to resolve genomic rearrangement breakpoints in TMPRSS2 and ERG at nucleotide resolution in a large series of primary prostate cancer specimens (n = 83). This strategy showed > 90% sensitivity and specificity in identifying TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangements, and allowed identification of intra- and inter-chromosomal rearrangements involving TMPRSS2 and ERG with known and novel fusion partners. Our results indicate that rearrangement breakpoints show strong clustering in specific intronic regions of TMPRSS2 and ERG. The observed TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangements often exhibited complex chromosomal architecture associated with several intra- and inter-chromosomal rearrangements. Nucleotide resolution analysis of breakpoint junctions revealed that the majority of TMPRSS2 and ERG rearrangements (~88%) occurred at or near regions of microhomology or involved insertions of one or more base pairs. This architecture implicates non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) pathways in the generation of such rearrangements. These analyses have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in generating prostate cancer-specific recurrent rearrangements.
Related JoVE Video
DNA methylation alterations exhibit intraindividual stability and interindividual heterogeneity in prostate cancer metastases.
Sci Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Human cancers almost ubiquitously harbor epigenetic alterations. Although such alterations in epigenetic marks, including DNA methylation, are potentially heritable, they can also be dynamically altered. Given this potential for plasticity, the degree to which epigenetic changes can be subject to selection and act as drivers of neoplasia has been questioned. We carried out genome-scale analyses of DNA methylation alterations in lethal metastatic prostate cancer and created DNA methylation "cityscape" plots to visualize these complex data. We show that somatic DNA methylation alterations, despite showing marked interindividual heterogeneity among men with lethal metastatic prostate cancer, were maintained across all metastases within the same individual. The overall extent of maintenance in DNA methylation changes was comparable to that of genetic copy number alterations. Regions that were frequently hypermethylated across individuals were markedly enriched for cancer- and development/differentiation-related genes. Additionally, regions exhibiting high consistency of hypermethylation across metastases within individuals, even if variably hypermethylated across individuals, showed enrichment for cancer-related genes. Whereas some regions showed intraindividual metastatic tumor heterogeneity in promoter methylation, such methylation alterations were generally not correlated with gene expression. This was despite a general tendency for promoter methylation patterns to be strongly correlated with gene expression, particularly at regions that were variably methylated across individuals. These findings suggest that DNA methylation alterations have the potential for producing selectable driver events in carcinogenesis and disease progression and highlight the possibility of targeting such epigenome alterations for development of longitudinal markers and therapeutic strategies.
Related JoVE Video
A mouse model of chronic prostatic inflammation using a human prostate cancer-derived isolate of Propionibacterium acnes.
Prostate
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Prostatic inflammation has been linked to a number of prostatic diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostatitis syndromes, and prostate cancer. Major unanswered questions include what pathogenic mechanisms, such as bacterial infections, may drive the accumulation of inflammatory infiltrates in the human prostate, and how inflammation might contribute to disease. To study this potential link in an in vivo system, we developed a mouse model of long-term bacteria-induced chronic inflammation of the prostate using a human prostatectomy-derived strain of Propionibacterium acnes.
Related JoVE Video
Dietary Chemoprevention of PhIP Induced Carcinogenesis in Male Fischer 344 Rats with Tomato and Broccoli.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The heterocyclic amine, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-B]pyridine (PhIP), found in meats cooked at high temperatures, has been implicated in epidemiological and rodent studies for causing breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. A previous animal study using a xenograft model has shown that whole tomato and broccoli, when eaten in combination, exhibit a marked effect on tumor reduction compared to when eaten alone. Our aim was to determine if PhIP-induced carcinogenesis can be prevented by dietary consumption of whole tomato + broccoli powders. Male Fischer 344 rats (n?=?45) were randomized into the following treatment groups: control (AIN93G diet), PhIP (200 ppm in AIN93G diet for the first 20 weeks of the study), or tomato + broccoli + PhIP (mixed in AIN93G diet at 10% each and fed with PhIP for 20 weeks, and then without PhIP for 32 weeks). Study animals were monitored for 52 weeks and were euthanized as necessary based on a set of criteria for health status and tumor burden. Although there appeared to be some hepatic and intestinal toxicity due to the combination of PhIP and tomato + broccoli, these rodents had improved survival and reduced incidence and/or severity of PhIP-induced neoplastic lesions compared to the PhIP-alone treated group. Rats eating tomato + broccoli exhibited a marked decrease in the number and size of cribiform prostatic intraepitheilial neoplasia/carcinoma in situ (cribiform PIN/CIS) lesions and in the incidence of invasive intestinal adenocarcinomas and skin carcinomas. Although the apparent toxic effects of combined PhIP and tomato + broccoli need additional study, the results of this study support the hypothesis that a diet rich in tomato and broccoli can reduce or prevent dietary carcinogen-induced cancers.
Related JoVE Video
A novel two-stage, transdisciplinary study identifies digoxin as a possible drug for prostate cancer treatment.
Cancer Discov
PUBLISHED: 12-06-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Identification of novel indications for commonly prescribed drugs could accelerate translation of therapies. We investigated whether any clinically-used drugs might have utility for treating prostate cancer by coupling an efficient, high-throughput laboratory-based screen and a large, prospective cohort study. In stage 1, we conducted an in vitro prostate cancer cell cytotoxicity screen of 3,187 compounds. Digoxin emerged as the leading candidate given its potency in inhibiting proliferation in vitro (mean IC??=163 nM) and common use. In stage 2, we evaluated the association between the leading candidate drug from stage 1 and prostate cancer risk in 47,884 men followed 1986-2006. Regular digoxin users (versus nonusers: RR=0.76, 95% CI 0.61-0.95), especially users for ? 10 years (RR=0.54, 95% CI 0.37-0.79, P-trend<0.001), had a lower prostate cancer risk. Digoxin was highly potent in inhibiting prostate cancer cell growth in vitro and its use was associated with a 25% lower prostate cancer risk.
Related JoVE Video
Myc enforces overexpression of EZH2 in early prostatic neoplasia via transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms.
Oncotarget
PUBLISHED: 09-24-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
EZH2 is part of the PRC2 polycomb repressive complex that is overexpressed in multiple cancer types and has been implicated in prostate cancer initiation and progression. Here, we identify EZH2 as a target of the MYC oncogene in prostate cancer and show that MYC coordinately regulates EZH2 through transcriptional and post-transcriptional means. Although prior studies in prostate cancer have revealed a number of possible mechanisms of EZH2 upregulation, these changes cannot account for the overexpression EZH2 in many primary prostate cancers, nor in most cases of high grade PIN. We report that upregulation of Myc in the mouse prostate results in overexpression of EZH2 mRNA and protein which coincides with reductions in miR-26a and miR-26b, known regulators of EZH2 in some non-prostate cell types, albeit not in others. Further, in human prostate cancer cells, Myc negatively regulates miR-26a and miR-26b via direct binding to their parental Pol II gene promoters, and forced overexpression of miR-26a and miR-26b in prostate cancer cells results in decreased EZH2 levels and suppressed proliferation. In human clinical samples, miR-26a and miR-26b are downregulated in most primary prostate cancers. As a separate mechanism of EZH2 mRNA upregulation, we find that Myc binds directly to and activates the transcription of the EZH2 promoter. These results link two major pathways in prostate cancer by providing two additional and complementary Myc-regulated mechanisms by which EZH2 upregulation occurs and is enforced during prostatic carcinogenesis. Further, the results implicate EZH2-driven mechanisms by which Myc may stimulate prostate tumor initiation and disease progression.
Related JoVE Video
Global 5-hydroxymethylcytosine content is significantly reduced in tissue stem/progenitor cell compartments and in human cancers.
Oncotarget
PUBLISHED: 09-08-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
DNA methylation at the 5-position of cytosines (5 mC) represents an important epigenetic modification involved in tissue differentiation and is frequently altered in cancer. Recent evidence suggests that 5 mC can be converted to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5 hmC) in an enzymatic process involving members of the TET protein family. Such 5 hmC modifications are known to be prevalent in DNA of embryonic stem cells and in the brain, but the distribution of 5 hmC in the majority of embryonic and adult tissues has not been rigorously explored. Here, we describe an immunohistochemical detection method for 5 hmC and the application of this technique to study the distribution of 5 hmC in a large set of mouse and human tissues. We found that 5 hmC was abundant in the majority of embryonic and adult tissues. Additionally, the level of 5 hmC closely tracked with the differentiation state of cells in hierarchically organized tissues. The highest 5 hmC levels were observed in terminally differentiated cells, while less differentiated tissue stem/progenitor cell compartments had very low 5 hmC levels. Furthermore, 5 hmC levels were profoundly reduced in carcinoma of the prostate, breast and colon compared to normal tissues. Our findings suggest a distinct role for 5 hmC in tissue differentiation, and provide evidence for its large-scale loss in cancers.
Related JoVE Video
Humanizing ?-class glutathione S-transferase regulation in a mouse model alters liver toxicity in response to acetaminophen overdose.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-22-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) metabolize drugs and xenobiotics. Yet despite high protein sequence homology, expression of ?-class GSTs, the most abundant of the enzymes, varies significantly between species. In mouse liver, hepatocytes exhibit high mGstp expression, while in human liver, hepatocytes contain little or no hGSTP1 mRNA or hGSTP1 protein. ?-class GSTs are known to be critical determinants of liver responses to drugs and toxins: when treated with high doses of acetaminophen, mGstp1/2+/+ mice suffer marked liver damage, while mGstp1/2-/- mice escape liver injury.
Related JoVE Video
Beefing up prostate cancer therapy with performance-enhancing (anti-) steroids.
Cancer Cell
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
In the May 26th issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, de Bono et al. report that the inhibition of androgen synthesis by abiraterone acetate prolonged the survival of men with prostate cancer previously treated by androgen suppression.
Related JoVE Video
Alterations in nucleolar structure and gene expression programs in prostatic neoplasia are driven by the MYC oncogene.
Am. J. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Increased nucleolar size and number are hallmark features of many cancers. In prostate cancer, nucleolar enlargement and increased numbers are some of the earliest morphological changes associated with development of premalignant prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) lesions and invasive adenocarcinomas. However, the molecular mechanisms that induce nucleolar alterations in PIN and prostate cancer remain largely unknown. We verify that activation of the MYC oncogene, which is overexpressed in most human PIN and prostatic adenocarcinomas, leads to formation of enlarged nucleoli and increased nucleolar number in prostate luminal epithelial cells in vivo. In prostate cancer cells in vitro, MYC expression is needed for maintenance of nucleolar number, and a nucleolar program of gene expression. To begin to decipher the functional relevance of this transcriptional program in prostate cancer, we examined FBL (encoding fibrillarin), a MYC target gene, and report that fibrillarin is required for proliferation, clonogenic survival, and proper ribosomal RNA accumulation/processing in human prostate cancer cells. Further, fibrillarin is overexpressed in PIN lesions induced by MYC overexpression in the mouse prostate, and in human clinical prostate adenocarcinoma and PIN lesions, where its expression correlates with MYC levels. These studies demonstrate that overexpression of the MYC oncogene increases nucleolar number and size and a nucleolar program of gene expression in prostate epithelial cells, thus providing a molecular mechanism responsible for hallmark nucleolar alterations in prostatic neoplasia.
Related JoVE Video
Transcription-induced DNA double strand breaks: both oncogenic force and potential therapeutic target?
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
An emerging model of transcriptional activation suggests that induction of transcriptional programs, for instance by stimulating prostate or breast cells with androgens or estrogens, respectively, involves the formation of DNA damage, including DNA double strand breaks (DSB), recruitment of DSB repair proteins, and movement of newly activated genes to transcription hubs. The DSB can be mediated by the class II topoisomerase TOP2B, which is recruited with the androgen receptor and estrogen receptor to regulatory sites on target genes and is apparently required for efficient transcriptional activation of these genes. These DSBs are recognized by the DNA repair machinery triggering the recruitment of repair proteins such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), ATM, and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). If illegitimately repaired, such DSBs can seed the formation of genomic rearrangements like the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion oncogene in prostate cancer. Here, we hypothesize that these transcription-induced, TOP2B-mediated DSBs can also be exploited therapeutically and propose that, in hormone-dependent tumors like breast and prostate cancers, a hormone-cycling therapy, in combination with topoisomerase II poisons or inhibitors of the DNA repair components PARP1 and DNA-PK, could overwhelm cancer cells with transcription-associated DSBs. Such strategies may find particular utility in cancers, like prostate cancer, which show low proliferation rates, in which other chemotherapeutic strategies that target rapidly proliferating cells have had limited success.
Related JoVE Video
Identification of replication competent murine gammaretroviruses in commonly used prostate cancer cell lines.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
A newly discovered gammaretrovirus, termed XMRV, was recently reported to be present in the prostate cancer cell line CWR22Rv1. Using a combination of both immunohistochemistry with broadly-reactive murine leukemia virus (MLV) anti-sera and PCR, we determined if additional prostate cancer or other cell lines contain XMRV or MLV-related viruses. Our study included a total of 72 cell lines, which included 58 of the 60 human cancer cell lines used in anticancer drug screens and maintained at the NCI-Frederick (NCI-60). We have identified gammaretroviruses in two additional prostate cancer cell lines: LAPC4 and VCaP, and show that these viruses are replication competent. Viral genome sequencing identified the virus in LAPC4 and VCaP as nearly identical to another known xenotropic MLV, Bxv-1. We also identified a gammaretrovirus in the non-small-cell lung carcinoma cell line EKVX. Prostate cancer cell lines appear to have a propensity for infection with murine gammaretroviruses, and we propose that this may be in part due to cell line establishment by xenograft passage in immunocompromised mice. It is unclear if infection with these viruses is necessary for cell line establishment, or what confounding role they may play in experiments performed with these commonly used lines. Importantly, our results suggest a need for regular screening of cancer cell lines for retroviral "contamination", much like routine mycoplasma testing.
Related JoVE Video
Chromosome-wide mapping of DNA methylation patterns in normal and malignant prostate cells reveals pervasive methylation of gene-associated and conserved intergenic sequences.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
DNA methylation has been linked to genome regulation and dysregulation in health and disease respectively, and methods for characterizing genomic DNA methylation patterns are rapidly emerging. We have developed/refined methods for enrichment of methylated genomic fragments using the methyl-binding domain of the human MBD2 protein (MBD2-MBD) followed by analysis with high-density tiling microarrays. This MBD-chip approach was used to characterize DNA methylation patterns across all non-repetitive sequences of human chromosomes 21 and 22 at high-resolution in normal and malignant prostate cells.
Related JoVE Video
Prostate cancer: New answers prompt new questions regarding cell of origin.
Nat Rev Urol
PUBLISHED: 12-09-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Controversies remain regarding the precise cell type from which prostate cancers originate. in the last 2 years, two separate studies have arrived at apparently conflicting models for the cell type involved in prostate cancer initiation. However, these results are not mutually exclusive: there are potential solutions, and alternative views on the initiating cell derivation of prostate tumors also exist.
Related JoVE Video
Accurate genome-scale percentage DNA methylation estimates from microarray data.
Biostatistics
PUBLISHED: 09-21-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
DNA methylation is a key regulator of gene function in a multitude of both normal and abnormal biological processes, but tools to elucidate its roles on a genome-wide scale are still in their infancy. Methylation sensitive restriction enzymes and microarrays provide a potential high-throughput, low-cost platform to allow methylation profiling. However, accurate absolute methylation estimates have been elusive due to systematic errors and unwanted variability. Previous microarray preprocessing procedures, mostly developed for expression arrays, fail to adequately normalize methylation-related data since they rely on key assumptions that are violated in the case of DNA methylation. We develop a normalization strategy tailored to DNA methylation data and an empirical Bayes percentage methylation estimator that together yield accurate absolute methylation estimates that can be compared across samples. We illustrate the method on data generated to detect methylation differences between tissues and between normal and tumor colon samples.
Related JoVE Video
MYC and Prostate Cancer.
Genes Cancer
PUBLISHED: 06-28-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Prostate cancer, the majority of which is adenocarcinoma, is the most common epithelial cancer affecting a majority of elderly men in Western nations. Its manifestation, however, varies from clinically asymptomatic insidious neoplasms that progress slowly and do not threaten life to one that is highly aggressive with a propensity for metastatic spread and lethality if not treated in time. A number of somatic genetic and epigenetic alterations occur in prostate cancer cells. Some of these changes, such as loss of the tumor suppressors PTEN and p53, are linked to disease progression. Others, such as ETS gene fusions, appear to be linked more with early phases of the disease, such as invasion. Alterations in chromosome 8q24 in the region of MYC have also been linked to disease aggressiveness for many years. However, a number of recent studies in human tissues have indicated that MYC appears to be activated at the earliest phases of prostate cancer (e.g., in tumor-initiating cells) in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, a key precursor lesion to invasive prostatic adenocarcinoma. The initiation and early progression of prostate cancer can be recapitulated in genetically engineered mouse models, permitting a richer understanding of the cause and effects of loss of tumor suppressors and activation of MYC. The combination of studies using human tissues and mouse models paints an emerging molecular picture of prostate cancer development and early progression. This picture reveals that MYC contributes to disease initiation and progression by stimulating an embryonic stem cell-like signature characterized by an enrichment of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and by repressing differentiation. These insights pave the way to potential novel therapeutic concepts based on MYC biology.
Related JoVE Video
Disulfiram is a DNA demethylating agent and inhibits prostate cancer cell growth.
Prostate
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The clinical success of the nucleoside analogs 5-aza-cytidine (5-azaC) and 5-aza-2deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) as DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors has spurred interest in the development of non-nucleoside inhibitors with improved pharmacologic and safety profiles. Because DNMT catalysis features attack of cytosine bases by an enzyme thiol group, we tested whether disulfiram (DSF), a thiol-reactive compound with known clinical safety, demonstrated DNMT inhibitory activity.
Related JoVE Video
Loss of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 function in prostate cancer cells causes chemoresistance and radioresistance and promotes tumor growth.
Mol. Cancer Ther.
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Loss-of-function mutations in the nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) inhibitor Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) result in increased Nrf2 activity in non-small cell lung cancer and confer therapeutic resistance. We detected point mutations in Keap1 gene, leading to nonconservative amino acid substitutions in prostate cancer cells. We found novel transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms of Keap1 inactivation, such as promoter CpG island hypermethylation and aberrant splicing of Keap1, in DU-145 cells. Very low levels of Keap1 mRNA were detected in DU-145 cells, which significantly increased by treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-deoxycytidine. The loss of Keap1 function led to an enhanced activity of Nrf2 and its downstream electrophile/drug detoxification pathway. Inhibition of Nrf2 expression in DU-145 cells by RNA interference attenuated the expression of glutathione, thioredoxin, and the drug efflux pathways involved in counteracting electrophiles, oxidative stress, and detoxification of a broad spectrum of drugs. DU-145 cells constitutively expressing Nrf2 short hairpin RNA had lower levels of total glutathione and higher levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Attenuation of Nrf2 function in DU-145 cells enhanced sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation-induced cell death. In addition, inhibition of Nrf2 greatly suppressed in vitro and in vivo tumor growth of DU-145 prostate cancer cells. Thus, targeting the Nrf2 pathway in prostate cancer cells may provide a novel strategy to enhance chemotherapy and radiotherapy responsiveness and ameliorate the growth and tumorigenicity, leading to improved clinical outcomes.
Related JoVE Video
MYC overexpression induces prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and loss of Nkx3.1 in mouse luminal epithelial cells.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Lo-MYC and Hi-MYC mice develop prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and prostatic adenocarcinoma as a result of MYC overexpression in the mouse prostate. However, prior studies have not determined precisely when, and in which cell types, MYC is induced. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC) to localize MYC expression in Lo-MYC transgenic mice, we show that morphological and molecular alterations characteristic of high grade PIN arise in luminal epithelial cells as soon as MYC overexpression is detected. These changes include increased nuclear and nucleolar size and large scale chromatin remodeling. Mouse PIN cells retained a columnar architecture and abundant cytoplasm and appeared as either a single layer of neoplastic cells or as pseudo-stratified/multilayered structures with open glandular lumina-features highly analogous to human high grade PIN. Also using IHC, we show that the onset of MYC overexpression and PIN development coincided precisely with decreased expression of the homeodomain transcription factor and tumor suppressor, Nkx3.1. Virtually all normal appearing prostate luminal cells expressed high levels of Nkx3.1, but all cells expressing MYC in PIN lesions showed marked reductions in Nkx3.1, implicating MYC as a key factor that represses Nkx3.1 in PIN lesions. To determine the effects of less pronounced overexpression of MYC we generated a new line of mice expressing MYC in the prostate under the transcriptional control of the mouse Nkx3.1 control region. These "Super-Lo-MYC" mice also developed PIN, albeit a less aggressive form. We also identified a histologically defined intermediate step in the progression of mouse PIN into invasive adenocarcinoma. These lesions are characterized by a loss of cell polarity, multi-layering, and cribriform formation, and by a "paradoxical" increase in Nkx3.1 protein. Similar histopathological changes occurred in Hi-MYC mice, albeit with accelerated kinetics. Our results using IHC provide novel insights that support the contention that MYC overexpression is sufficient to transform prostate luminal epithelial cells into PIN cells in vivo. We also identified a novel histopathologically identifiable intermediate step prior to invasion that should facilitate studies of molecular pathway alterations occurring during early progression of prostatic adenocarcinomas.
Related JoVE Video
Androgen-induced TOP2B-mediated double-strand breaks and prostate cancer gene rearrangements.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can lead to the development of genomic rearrangements, which are hallmarks of cancer. Fusions between TMPRSS2, encoding the transmembrane serine protease isoform 2, and ERG, encoding the v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog, are among the most common oncogenic rearrangements observed in human cancer. We show that androgen signaling promotes co-recruitment of androgen receptor and topoisomerase II beta (TOP2B) to sites of TMPRSS2-ERG genomic breakpoints, triggering recombinogenic TOP2B-mediated DSBs. Furthermore, androgen stimulation resulted in de novo production of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion transcripts in a process that required TOP2B and components of the DSB repair machinery. Finally, unlike normal prostate epithelium, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia cells showed strong coexpression of androgen receptor and TOP2B. These findings implicate androgen-induced TOP2B-mediated DSBs in generating TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangements.
Related JoVE Video
miR-21: an androgen receptor-regulated microRNA that promotes hormone-dependent and hormone-independent prostate cancer growth.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 09-08-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Androgen receptor (AR)-mediated oncogenic pathways have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we used high-throughput microarray analysis on two AR-positive prostate cancer (CaP) cell lines to identify 16 AR-responsive microRNAs (miRNA). We focused on miR-21 because of its previously reported oncogenic activity in other cancers. We show androgen-induced AR binding to the defined miR-21 promoter, miPPR-21, suggesting direct transcriptional regulation. Inhibition of miR-21 diminished androgen-induced CaP cell proliferation, providing new evidence that miRNAs can contribute to androgen-driven cell growth. Elevated expression of miR-21 enhanced CaP tumor growth in vivo and, surprisingly, was sufficient for androgen-dependent tumors to overcome castration-mediated growth arrest. Thus, elevated miR-21 expression alone is sufficient to impart castration resistance. Moreover, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed elevated miR-21 expression in CaP when compared with adjacent normal tissue. These results suggest that miR-21 may contribute to CaP pathogenesis.
Related JoVE Video
Epigenetic alterations in human prostate cancers.
Endocrinology
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Human prostate cancer cells carry a myriad of genome defects, including both genetic and epigenetic alterations. These changes, which can be maintained through mitosis, generate malignant phenotypes capable of selective growth, survival, invasion, and metastasis. During prostatic carcinogenesis, epigenetic changes arise earlier than genetic defects, linking the appearance of epigenetic alterations in some way to disease etiology. The most common genetic defect thus far described, leading to fusion transcripts between the androgen-regulated gene TMPRSS2 and genes from the ETS family of transcription factors, likely endows prostate cancer cells with the ability to co-opt androgen signaling, the major prostate differentiation pathway, to support the malignant phenotype. Whether epigenetic changes promote the appearance of TMPRSS2-ETS family fusion transcripts or collaborate with fusion transcript expression in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer has not been established. However, a growing list of epigenetic alterations has provided new opportunities for clinical tests that might aid in prostate cancer screening, detection, diagnosis, staging, and risk stratification. The epigenetic changes appear to be more attractive than genetic changes as prostate cancer biomarkers because epigenetic alterations are present in a greater fraction of prostate cancer cases than any of the known genetic defects. In addition, an emerging generation of assay strategies for detection of specific DNA sequences carrying (5-me)C, the major epigenetic genome mark, has pushed somatic epigenetic alterations to the forefront of molecular biomarker assay development for cancer. Finally, a growing portfolio of epigenetic drugs, capable of reversing the phenotypic consequences of somatic epigenetic defects, has entered clinical trials for prostate cancer in the search for a new rational therapy for the disease.
Related JoVE Video
Anti-inflammatory drugs, antioxidants, and prostate cancer prevention.
Curr Opin Pharmacol
PUBLISHED: 05-11-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Prostate cancer may be the most common preventable cancer among men in the United States (US) and the rest of the developed world. Emerging insights into the molecular pathogenesis of prostate cancer suggest that damage to the prostate epithelium, potentially inflicted by a variety of exposures, triggers procarcinogenic inflammatory processes to promote disease development. In this milieu, the damaged epithelium may generate proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA) lesions, which may progress to prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) or to prostate cancer. To attenuate prostatic carcinogenesis driven by chronic or recurrent prostate inflammation, rational chemoprevention has thus far featured anti-inflammatory drugs and antioxidants. Results from clinical trials of these approaches have been mixed, emphasizing the need for mechanistic studies of the contribution of inflammation to prostatic carcinogenesis, more extensive analyses of the pharmacology, including distribution of drugs into target tissue, and, rational development of biomarkers to identify patients that are most likely to respond to anti-inflammatory drugs and antioxidants (targeted chemoprevention), alone, or in combination (combination chemoprevention).
Related JoVE Video
Copy number analysis indicates monoclonal origin of lethal metastatic prostate cancer.
Nat. Med.
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Many studies have shown that primary prostate cancers are multifocal and are composed of multiple genetically distinct cancer cell clones. Whether or not multiclonal primary prostate cancers typically give rise to multiclonal or monoclonal prostate cancer metastases is largely unknown, although studies at single chromosomal loci are consistent with the latter case. Here we show through a high-resolution genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism and copy number survey that most, if not all, metastatic prostate cancers have monoclonal origins and maintain a unique signature copy number pattern of the parent cancer cell while also accumulating a variable number of separate subclonally sustained changes. We find no relationship between anatomic site of metastasis and genomic copy number change pattern. Taken together with past animal and cytogenetic studies of metastasis and recent single-locus genetic data in prostate and other metastatic cancers, these data indicate that despite common genomic heterogeneity in primary cancers, most metastatic cancers arise from a single precursor cancer cell. This study establishes that genomic archeology of multiple anatomically separate metastatic cancers in individuals can be used to define the salient genomic features of a parent cancer clone of proven lethal metastatic phenotype.
Related JoVE Video
Genetic and epigenetic inactivation of LPL gene in human prostate cancer.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 02-07-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is in chromosome 8p22, site of one of the most common somatic deletions in prostate tumors. Additionally, a CpG island (CGI) was identified in the LPL promoter region. To test the hypothesis that LPL is a tumor suppressor gene, which is inactivated by somatic deletion and hypermethylation in prostate cancer, we evaluated somatic DNA deletion and methylation status at LPL in 56 pairs of DNA samples isolated from prostate cancer tissues and matching normal controls and 11 prostate cell lines. We found that the DNA in 21 of 56 primary cancers (38%) was methylated in the LPL promoter CGI, whereas no methylation was detected in any normal samples. In addition, we found a hemizygous deletion at LPL in 38 of the 56 tumors (68%). When the results of deletion and methylation were considered together, we found LPL promoter CGI methylation occurred in 45% of LPL deleted tumors and in 22% of LPL retained tumors. Within several clinical characteristics tested, the preoperative PSA levels were found to be significantly higher in subjects with LPL promoter CGI methylation compared with subjects without LPL promoter methylation (p=0.0012). Additionally, demethylation of the LPL promoter CGI was accompanied by transcriptional reactivation of LPL in the prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3. In summary, we report a novel finding that the LPL gene is commonly methylated in prostate tumors, and our results suggest that biallelic inactivation of LPL by chromosomal deletion and promoter hypermethylation may play a role in human prostate cancer.
Related JoVE Video
Prospective study of genomic hypomethylation of leukocyte DNA and colorectal cancer risk.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Systematic genome-wide reductions of methylated cytosine (5-mC) levels have been observed in colorectal cancer tissue and are suspected to play a role in carcinogenesis, possibly as a consequence of inadequate folate intake. Reduced 5-mC levels in peripheral blood leukocytes have been associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer and adenoma in cross-sectional studies.
Related JoVE Video
Decreased 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is associated with neural progenitor phenotype in normal brain and shorter survival in malignant glioma.
PLoS ONE
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Epigenetic modification of DNA by cytosine methylation to produce 5-methylcytosine (5mC) has become well-recognized as an important epigenetic process in human health and disease. Recently, further modification of 5mC by the ten eleven translocated (TET) family of enzymes to produce 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has been described. In the present study, we used immunohistochemistry to evaluate the distribution of 5hmC in human brain during different periods of development and in a large series of gliomas (n=225). We found that during development, 5hmC levels are high in more differentiated compartments like the fetal cortex, but low in the periventricular progenitor cell regions. In adults, we found 5hmC levels to be highest in the cortex, but present in all intrinsic cell types in the brain including stromal elements. In brain tumors, 5hmC levels were high in low grade tumors and reduced in malignant glioma, but did not exhibit any correlation with IDH1 mutation status. Additionally, we identified a significant relationship between low levels of 5hmC and reduced survival in malignant glioma. This observation was further supported by in silico analysis showing differential expression of genes involved in 5hmC homeostasis in aggressive subsets of glioblastoma. Finally, we show that several genes involved in regulating the levels of 5hmC are also prognostic in malignant glioma. These findings suggest that 5hmC regulation in malignant glioma may represent an important determinant of tumor differentiation and aggressive behavior, as well as a potential therapeutic target.
Related JoVE Video
Global levels of H3K27me3 track with differentiation in vivo and are deregulated by MYC in prostate cancer.
Am. J. Pathol.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Cancer cells and stem cells share a number of biological characteristics including abundant amounts of decondensed chromatin. However, the molecular correlates and the factors involved in altering chromatin structure in cancer cells are not well known. Here, we report that less differentiated stem-like cells in the basal compartment of human and mouse prostate contain lower levels of the polycomb heterochromatin marker H3K27me3 than more differentiated luminal cells. This link to differentiated normal cells is also found in a number of other human and rodent tissues characterized by hierarchical differentiation. In addition to MYCs traditional role as a gene-specific transcription factor, recent studies indicate that MYC also affects global chromatin structure where it is required to maintain "open" or active chromatin. We now demonstrate that in both MYC-driven prostate cancers in mice and human prostate cancers, global levels of H3K27me3 are reduced in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive adenocarcinoma lesions. Moreover, decreased levels of H3K27me3 correlate with increased markers of disease aggressiveness (eg, Gleason score and pathological stage). In vitro, experimentally forced reductions in MYC levels result in increased global levels of H3K27me3. These findings suggest that increased levels of decondensed chromatin in both normal progenitor cells and cancer cells are associated with global loss of H3K27me3, which is linked to MYC overexpression.
Related JoVE Video
Distinct transcriptional programs mediated by the ligand-dependent full-length androgen receptor and its splice variants in castration-resistant prostate cancer.
Cancer Res.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Continued androgen receptor (AR) signaling is an established mechanism underlying castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and suppression of androgen receptor signaling remains a therapeutic goal of CRPC therapy. Constitutively active androgen receptor splice variants (AR-Vs) lack the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain (AR-LBD), the intended target of androgen deprivation therapies including CRPC therapies such as abiraterone and MDV3100. While the canonical full-length androgen receptor (AR-FL) and AR-Vs are both increased in CRPCs, their expression regulation, associated transcriptional programs, and functional relationships have not been dissected. In this study, we show that suppression of ligand-mediated AR-FL signaling by targeting AR-LBD leads to increased AR-V expression in two cell line models of CRPCs. Importantly, treatment-induced AR-Vs activated a distinct expression signature enriched for cell-cycle genes without requiring the presence of AR-FL. Conversely, activation of AR-FL signaling suppressed the AR-Vs signature and activated expression programs mainly associated with macromolecular synthesis, metabolism, and differentiation. In prostate cancer cells and CRPC xenografts treated with MDV3100 or abiraterone, increased expression of two constitutively active AR-Vs, AR-V7 and ARV567ES, but not AR-FL, paralleled increased expression of the androgen receptor-driven cell-cycle gene UBE2C. Expression of AR-V7, but not AR-FL, was positively correlated with UBE2C in clinical CRPC specimens. Together, our findings support an adaptive shift toward AR-V-mediated signaling in a subset of CRPC tumors as the AR-LBD is rendered inactive, suggesting an important mechanism contributing to drug resistance to CRPC therapy.
Related JoVE Video
USP2a activation of MYC in prostate cancer.
Cancer Discov
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Ubiquitin-specific protease 2a, a deubiquitinating enzyme, elevates MYC levels in prostate cancer cells via its stabilization of MDM2, undermining p53 regulation of microRNAs that target MYC mRNA.
Related JoVE Video
A novel source for miR-21 expression through the alternative polyadenylation of VMP1 gene transcripts.
Nucleic Acids Res.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
miR-21 is the most commonly over-expressed microRNA (miRNA) in cancer and a proven oncogene. Hsa-miR-21 is located on chromosome 17q23.2, immediately downstream of the vacuole membrane protein-1 (VMP1) gene, also known as TMEM49. VMP1 transcripts initiate ? 130 kb upstream of miR-21, are spliced, and polyadenylated only a few hundred base pairs upstream of the miR-21 hairpin. On the other hand, primary miR-21 transcripts (pri-miR-21) originate within the last introns of VMP1, but bypass VMP1 polyadenylation signals to include the miR-21 hairpin. Here, we report that VMP1 transcripts can also bypass these polyadenylation signals to include miR-21, thus providing a novel and independently regulated source of miR-21, termed VMP1-miR-21. Northern blotting, gene-specific RT-PCR, RNA pull-down and DNA branching assays support that VMP1-miR-21 is expressed at significant levels in a number of cancer cell lines and that it is processed by the Microprocessor complex to produce mature miR-21. VMP1 and pri-miR-21 are induced by common stimuli, such as phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and androgens, but show differential responses to some stimuli such as epigenetic modifying agents. Collectively, these results indicate that miR-21 is a unique miRNA capable of being regulated by alternative polyadenylation and two independent gene promoters.
Related JoVE Video
A DNA hypermethylation module for the stem/progenitor cell signature of cancer.
Genome Res.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Many DNA-hypermethylated cancer genes are occupied by the Polycomb (PcG) repressor complex in embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Their prevalence in the full spectrum of cancers, the exact context of chromatin involved, and their status in adult cell renewal systems are unknown. Using a genome-wide analysis, we demonstrate that ~75% of hypermethylated genes are marked by PcG in the context of bivalent chromatin in both ESCs and adult stem/progenitor cells. A large number of these genes are key developmental regulators, and a subset, which we call the "DNA hypermethylation module," comprises a portion of the PcG target genes that are down-regulated in cancer. Genes with bivalent chromatin have a low, poised gene transcription state that has been shown to maintain stemness and self-renewal in normal stem cells. However, when DNA-hypermethylated in tumors, we find that these genes are further repressed. We also show that the methylation status of these genes can cluster important subtypes of colon and breast cancers. By evaluating the subsets of genes that are methylated in different cancers with consideration of their chromatin status in ESCs, we provide evidence that DNA hypermethylation preferentially targets the subset of PcG genes that are developmental regulators, and this may contribute to the stem-like state of cancer. Additionally, the capacity for global methylation profiling to cluster tumors by phenotype may have important implications for further refining tumor behavior patterns that may ultimately aid therapeutic interventions.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.