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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Impact of harmonization of collection tubes on Alzheimer's disease diagnosis.
Alzheimers Dement
PUBLISHED: 08-05-2014
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The objective of this study was to analyze differences in biomarker outcomes before and after harmonization of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection tubes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) diagnosis.
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Treatment of sleep apnoea syndrome decreases cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease.
J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatr.
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2014
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It is essential to detect and then treat factors that aggravate Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we sought to determine whether or not continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for sleep apnoea syndrome (SAS) slows the rate of cognitive decline in mild-to-moderate AD patients.
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Thrombolytic therapy for stroke in patients with preexisting cognitive impairment.
Neurology
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2014
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We aimed to evaluate the influence of prestroke cognitive impairment (PSCI) on outcomes in stroke patients treated with IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA).
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Multisite longitudinal reliability of tract-based spatial statistics in diffusion tensor imaging of healthy elderly subjects.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2014
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Large-scale longitudinal neuroimaging studies with diffusion imaging techniques are necessary to test and validate models of white matter neurophysiological processes that change in time, both in healthy and diseased brains. The predictive power of such longitudinal models will always be limited by the reproducibility of repeated measures acquired during different sessions. At present, there is limited quantitative knowledge about the across-session reproducibility of standard diffusion metrics in 3T multi-centric studies on subjects in stable conditions, in particular when using tract based spatial statistics and with elderly people. In this study we implemented a multi-site brain diffusion protocol in 10 clinical 3T MRI sites distributed across 4 countries in Europe (Italy, Germany, France and Greece) using vendor provided sequences from Siemens (Allegra, Trio Tim, Verio, Skyra, Biograph mMR), Philips (Achieva) and GE (HDxt) scanners. We acquired DTI data (2 × 2 × 2 mm(3), b = 700 s/mm(2), 5 b0 and 30 diffusion weighted volumes) of a group of healthy stable elderly subjects (5 subjects per site) in two separate sessions at least a week apart. For each subject and session four scalar diffusion metrics were considered: fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), radial diffusivity (RD) and axial (AD) diffusivity. The diffusion metrics from multiple subjects and sessions at each site were aligned to their common white matter skeleton using tract-based spatial statistics. The reproducibility at each MRI site was examined by looking at group averages of absolute changes relative to the mean (%) on various parameters: i) reproducibility of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the b0 images in centrum semiovale, ii) full brain test-retest differences of the diffusion metric maps on the white matter skeleton, iii) reproducibility of the diffusion metrics on atlas-based white matter ROIs on the white matter skeleton. Despite the differences of MRI scanner configurations across sites (vendors, models, RF coils and acquisition sequences) we found good and consistent test-retest reproducibility. White matter b0 SNR reproducibility was on average 7 ± 1% with no significant MRI site effects. Whole brain analysis resulted in no significant test-retest differences at any of the sites with any of the DTI metrics. The atlas-based ROI analysis showed that the mean reproducibility errors largely remained in the 2-4% range for FA and AD and 2-6% for MD and RD, averaged across ROIs. Our results show reproducibility values comparable to those reported in studies using a smaller number of MRI scanners, slightly different DTI protocols and mostly younger populations. We therefore show that the acquisition and analysis protocols used are appropriate for multi-site experimental scenarios.
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A new decision tree combining Abeta 1-42 and p-Tau levels in Alzheimers diagnosis.
Curr Alzheimer Res
PUBLISHED: 11-06-2013
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The objective of this work was to improve the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimers disease (AD) by proposing a simple decision tree based on three major biomarkers of AD found in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF): amyloid peptide A?1- 42, total Tau (t-Tau) and Tau phosphorylated at Thr181 (p-Tau). Two consecutive cohorts comprising 548 patients in total were recruited by the Memory and Neurology Clinics at Lille University Hospital (France). These included 293 patients with AD, 171 patients with other dementias and 84 healthy controls. All patients underwent lumbar puncture for the assessment of CSF concentrations of A?1-42, t-Tau and p-Tau. International criteria for dementias were used for diagnosis by investigators blind to CSF test results. To identify the combination of biomarkers that best predicted the 3 diagnoses, we used the CHAID decision tree method with the first cohort. Our analysis yielded a two-step decision tree, with a first stratification step based on the A?1-42/p-Tau ratio of the CSF, and a second step based on CSF p-Tau concentrations. The second cohort was then used to determine the power (0.618), sensitivity (82%) and specificity (81%) of this tree in AD diagnosis. These were found to be at least as high as those of other known algorithms based on the three CSF biomarkers, A?1-42, t-Tau and p-Tau.For the first time, diagnostic rules for AD based on CSF variables were compared in a single study. Our findings indicate that the measurement of A?1-42 and p-Tau levels in the CSF is sufficient to diagnose AD.
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Reasons that prevent the inclusion of Alzheimers disease patients in clinical trials.
Br J Clin Pharmacol
PUBLISHED: 09-21-2013
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To assess reasons that prevent Alzheimers disease (AD) patients from being included in clinical trials.
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Exacerbated CSF abnormalities in younger patients with Alzheimers disease.
Neurobiol. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2013
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Increasing age is the most important risk factor for developing Alzheimers disease (AD). The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between age and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of ?-amyloid (A? 1-42), total Tau and phosphorylated Tau (pTau-181), in AD and non-AD patients explored for cognitive disorders. 966 patients (AD, n=528; non-AD, n=438) were included between January 2008 and December 2010 (mean age, 69.5years; mean MMSE, 20.2) from three French memory centers. Multivariable linear regression models were used to study the relationship between CSF biomarker levels and age in AD and non-AD patients. The capacity of each CSF biomarker in discriminating patients was evaluated using the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves by quartile of distribution of age. In AD patients, older age was associated with higher CSF A? 1-42 and lower Tau levels. Conversely, in non-AD patients, age was associated with lower CSF A? 1-42, higher Tau, and higher pTau-181 levels. In sex-stratified analysis, these relationships were significant only in women. Using ROC curve analysis, CSF AD biomarkers were more discriminant in younger patients than in older ones. In this clinically-based study, younger patients with AD had exacerbated CSF anomalies compared to older patients with AD. CSF biomarkers were more discriminant in younger patients than in older ones for the diagnosis of AD, especially in women. These results support the idea of an overlap in AD neuropathological lesions in oldest subjects with or without AD.
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A genome-wide study reveals rare CNVs exclusive to extreme phenotypes of Alzheimer disease.
Eur. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 12-14-2011
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Studying rare extreme forms of Alzheimer disease (AD) may prove to be a useful strategy in identifying new genes involved in monogenic determinism of AD. Amyloid precursor protein (APP), PSEN1, and PSEN2 mutations account for only 85% of autosomal dominant early-onset AD (ADEOAD) families. We hypothesised that rare copy number variants (CNVs) could be involved in ADEOAD families without mutations in known genes, as well as in rare sporadic young-onset AD cases. Using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridisation, we assessed the presence of rare CNVs in 21 unrelated ADEOAD cases, having no alteration on known genes, and 12 sporadic AD cases, with an age of onset younger than 55 years. The analysis revealed the presence of 7 singleton CNVs (4 in ADEOAD and 3 in sporadic cases) absent in 1078 controls and 912 late-onset AD cases. Strikingly, 4 out of 7 rearrangements target genes (KLK6, SLC30A3, MEOX2, and FPR2) encoding proteins that are tightly related to amyloid-? peptide metabolism or signalling. Although these variants are individually rare and restricted to particular subgroups of patients, these findings support the causal role, in human pathology, of a set of genes coding for molecules suspected for a long time to modify A? metabolism or signalling, and for which animal or cellular models have already been developed.
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[Molecular actors in Alzheimers disease: which diagnostic and therapeutic consequences?].
Therapie
PUBLISHED: 12-13-2010
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Alzheimers disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by neuropathological lesions: amyloid deposits and neurofibrillary degeneration. However, the links between these two brain hallmarks are still poorly understood. Until now, mainly amyloid pathology has been targeted un many clinical trials without any success. Both new therapeutic strategies and diagnosis improvement are needed.
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Bilateral temporal glioma presenting as a paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis with pure cognitive impairment.
Neurologist
PUBLISHED: 07-11-2009
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Memory impairment caused by bilateral hippocampal primitive brain tumor is rarely reported. Clinical and MRI features can mimic paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (PLE), and the differential diagnosis between these 2 entities may be difficult.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.