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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Applying Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) to support Integrated Approaches to Testing and Assessment (IATA).
Regul. Toxicol. Pharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 09-04-2014
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Chemical regulation is challenged by the large number of chemicals requiring assessment for potential human health and environmental impacts. Current approaches are too resource intensive in terms of time, money and animal use to evaluate all chemicals under development or already on the market. The need for timely and robust decision making demands that regulatory toxicity testing becomes more cost-effective and efficient. One way to realize this goal is by being more strategic in directing testing resources; focusing on chemicals of highest concern, limiting testing to the most probable hazards, or targeting the most vulnerable species. Hypothesis driven Integrated Approaches to Testing and Assessment (IATA) have been proposed as practical solutions to such strategic testing. In parallel, the development of the Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework, which provides information on the causal links between a molecular initiating event (MIE), intermediate key events (KEs) and an adverse outcome (AO) of regulatory concern, offers the biological context to facilitate development of IATA for regulatory decision making. This manuscript summarizes discussions at the Workshop entitled "Advancing AOPs for Integrated Toxicology and Regulatory Applications" with particular focus on the role AOPs play in informing the development of IATA for different regulatory purposes.
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Endocrine, teratogenic and neurotoxic effects of cyanobacteria detected by cellular in vitro and zebrafish embryos assays.
Chemosphere
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2014
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Cyanobacteria contain various types of bioactive compounds, which could cause adverse effects on organisms. They are released into surface waters during cyanobacterial blooms, but there is little information on their potential relevance for effects in vivo. In this study presence of bioactive compounds was characterized in cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa (Chroococcales), Planktothrix agardhii (Oscillatoriales) and Aphanizomenon gracile (Nostocales) with selected in vitro assays. The in vivo relevance of detected bioactivities was analysed using transgenic zebrafish embryos tg(cyp19a1b-GFP). Teratogenic potency was assessed by analysis of developmental disorders and effects on functions of the neuromuscular system by video tracking of locomotion. Estrogenicity in vitro corresponded to 0.95-54.6ng estradiol equivalent(gdryweight (dw))(-1). In zebrafish embryos, estrogenic effects could not be detected potentially because they were masked by high toxicity. There was no detectable (anti)androgenic/glucocorticoid activity in any sample. Retinoid-like activity was determined at 1-1.3?g all-trans-retinoic acid equivalent(gdw)(-1). Corresponding to the retinoid-like activity A. gracile extract also caused teratogenic effects in zebrafish embryos. Furthermore, exposure to biomass extracts at 0.3gdwL(-1) caused increase of body length in embryos. There were minor effects on locomotion caused by 0.3gdwL(-1)M. aeruginosa and P. agardhii extracts. The traditionally measured cyanotoxins microcystins did not seem to play significant role in observed effects. This indicates importance of other cyanobacterial compounds at least towards some species or their developmental phases. More attention should be paid to activity of retinoids, estrogens and other bioactive substances in phytoplankton using in vitro and in vivo bioassays.
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Can functional capacity tests predict future work capacity in patients with whiplash-associated disorders?
Arch Phys Med Rehabil
PUBLISHED: 08-12-2014
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To determine whether Functional Capacity Evaluation (FCE) tests predict future work capacity of patients with whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) grades I and II who did not regain full work capacity 6-12 weeks after injury.
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Retinoid-like activity and teratogenic effects of cyanobacterial exudates.
Aquat. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 07-06-2014
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Retinoic acids and their derivatives have been recently identified by chemical analyses in cyanobacteria and algae. Given the essential role of retinoids for vertebrate development this has raised concerns about a potential risk for vertebrates exposed to retinoids during cyanobacterial blooms. Our study focuses on extracellular compounds produced by phytoplankton cells (exudates). In order to address the capacity for the production of retinoids or compounds with retinoid-like activity we compared the exudates of ten cyanobacteria and algae using in vitro reporter gene assay. Exudates of three cyanobacterial species showed retinoid-like activity in the range of 269-2,265 ng retinoid equivalents (REQ)/L, while there was no detectable activity in exudates of the investigated algal species. The exudates of one green alga (Desmodesmus quadricaudus) and the two cyanobacterial species with greatest REQ levels, Microcystis aeruginosa and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, were selected for testing of the potential relation of retinoid-like activity to developmental toxicity in zebrafish embryos. The exudates of both cyanobacteria were indeed provoking diverse teratogenic effects (e.g. tail, spine and mouth deformation) and interference with growth in zebrafish embryos, while such effects were not observed for the alga. Fish embryos were also exposed to all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in a range equivalent to the REQ concentrations detected in exudates by in vitro bioassays. Both the phenotypes and effective concentrations of exudates corresponded to ATRA equivalents, supporting the hypothesis that the teratogenic effects of cyanobacterial exudates are likely to be associated with retinoid-like activity. The study documents that some cyanobacteria are able to produce and release retinoid-like compounds into the environment at concentrations equivalent to those causing teratogenicity in zebrafish. Hence, the characterization of retinoid-like and teratogenic potency should be included in the assessment of the potential adverse effects caused by the release of toxic and bioactive compounds during cyanobacterial blooms.
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A low-temperature modification of hexa-tert-butyldisilane and a new polymorph of 1,1,2,2-tetra-tert-butyl-1,2-diphenyldisilane.
Acta Crystallogr C Struct Chem
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2014
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Crystals of hexa-tert-butyldisilane, C24H54Si2, undergo a reversible phase transition at 179?(2)?K. The space group changes from Ibca (high temperature) to Pbca (low temperature), but the lattice constants a, b and c do not change significantly during the phase transition. The crystallographic twofold axis of the molecule in the high-temperature phase is replaced by a noncrystallographic twofold axis in the low-temperature phase. The angle between the two axes is 2.36?(4)°. The centre of the molecule undergoes a translation of 0.123?(1)?Å during the phase transition, but the conformation angles of the molecule remain unchanged. Between the two tri-tert-butylsilyl subunits there are six short repulsive intramolecular C-H···H-C contacts, with H···H distances between 2.02 and 2.04?Å, resulting in a significant lengthening of the Si-Si and Si-C bonds. The Si-Si bond length is 2.6863?(5)?Å and the Si-C bond lengths are between 1.9860?(14) and 1.9933?(14)?Å. Torsion angles about the Si-Si and Si-C bonds deviate by approximately 15° from the values expected for staggered conformations due to intramolecular steric H···H repulsions. A new polymorph is reported for the crystal structure of 1,1,2,2-tetra-tert-butyl-1,2-diphenyldisilane, C28H46Si2. It has two independent molecules with rather similar conformations. The Si-Si bond lengths are 2.4869?(8) and 2.4944?(8)?Å. The C-Si-Si-C torsion angles deviate by between -3.4?(1) and -18.5?(1)° from the values expected for a staggered conformation. These deviations result from steric interactions. Four Si-C(t-Bu) bonds are almost staggered, while the other four Si-C(t-Bu) bonds are intermediate between a staggered and an eclipsed conformation. The latter Si-C(t-Bu) bonds are about 0.019?(2)?Å longer than the staggered Si-C(t-Bu) bonds.
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OECD validation study to assess intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility of the zebrafish embryo toxicity test for acute aquatic toxicity testing.
Regul. Toxicol. Pharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2014
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The OECD validation study of the zebrafish embryo acute toxicity test (ZFET) for acute aquatic toxicity testing evaluated the ZFET reproducibility by testing 20 chemicals at 5 different concentrations in 3 independent runs in at least 3 laboratories. Stock solutions and test concentrations were analytically confirmed for 11 chemicals. Newly fertilised zebrafish eggs (20/concentration and control) were exposed for 96h to chemicals. Four apical endpoints were recorded daily as indicators of acute lethality: coagulation of the embryo, lack of somite formation, non-detachment of the tail bud from the yolk sac and lack of heartbeat. Results (LC50 values for 48/96h exposure) show that the ZFET is a robust method with a good intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility (CV<30%) for most chemicals and laboratories. The reproducibility was lower (CV>30%) for some very toxic or volatile chemicals, and chemicals tested close to their limit of solubility. The ZFET is now available as OECD Test Guideline 236. Considering the high predictive capacity of the ZFET demonstrated by Belanger et al. (2013) in their retrospective analysis of acute fish toxicity and fish embryo acute toxicity data, the ZFET is ready to be considered for acute fish toxicity for regulatory purposes.
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Extensive review of fish embryo acute toxicities for the prediction of GHS acute systemic toxicity categories.
Regul. Toxicol. Pharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2014
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Distribution and marketing of chemicals require appropriate labelling of health, physical and environmental hazards according to the United Nations global harmonisation system (GHS). Labelling for (human) acute toxicity categories is based on experimental findings usually obtained by oral, dermal or inhalative exposure of rodents. There is a strong societal demand for replacing animal experiments conducted for safety assessment of chemicals. Fish embryos are considered as alternative to animal testing and are proposed as predictive model both for environmental and human health effects. Therefore, we tested whether LC50s of the fish embryo acute toxicity test would allow effectively predicting of acute mammalian toxicity categories. A database of published fish embryo LC50 containing 641 compounds was established. For these compounds corresponding rat oral LD50 were identified resulting in 364 compounds for which both fish embryo LC50 and rat LD50 was available. Only a weak correlation of fish embryo LC50 and rat oral LD50 was obtained. Fish embryos were also not able to effectively predict GHS oral acute toxicity categories. We concluded that due to fundamental exposure protocol differences (single oral dose versus water-borne exposure) a reverse dosimetry approach is needed to explore the predictive capacity of fish embryos.
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Effect-directed analysis for estrogenic compounds in a fluvial sediment sample using transgenic cyp19a1b-GFP zebrafish embryos.
Aquat. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2014
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Xenoestrogens may persist in the environment by binding to sediments or suspended particulate matter serving as long-term reservoir and source of exposure, particularly for organisms living in or in contact with sediments. In this study, we present for the first time an effect-directed analysis (EDA) for identifying estrogenic compounds in a sediment sample using embryos of a transgenic reporter fish strain. In the tg(cyp19a1b-GFP) transgenic zebrafish strain, the expression of GFP (green fluorescent protein) in the brain is driven by an oestrogen responsive element in the promoter of the cyp19a1b (aromatase) gene. The selected sediment sample of the Czech river Bilina had already been analysed in a previous EDA using the yeast oestrogen screening assay and had revealed fractions containing estrogenic compounds. When normal phase HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography) fractionation was used for the separation of the sediment sample, the biotest with transgenic fish embryos revealed two estrogenic fractions. Chemical analysis of candidate compounds in these sediment fractions suggested alkylphenols and estrone as candidate compounds responsible for the observed estrogenic effect. Alkylphenol concentrations could partially explain the estrogenicity of the fractions. However, xenoestrogens below the analytical detection limit or non-targeted estrogenic compounds have probably also contributed to the sample's estrogenic potency. The results indicated the suitability of the tg(cyp19a1b-GFP) fish embryo for an integrated chemical-biological analysis of estrogenic effects.
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Transient overexpression of adh8a increases allyl alcohol toxicity in zebrafish embryos.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Fish embryos are widely used as an alternative model to study toxicity in vertebrates. Due to their complexity, embryos are believed to more resemble an adult organism than in vitro cellular models. However, concerns have been raised with respect to the embryo's metabolic capacity. We recently identified allyl alcohol, an industrial chemical, to be several orders of magnitude less toxic to zebrafish embryo than to adult zebrafish (embryo LC50?=?478 mg/L vs. fish LC50?=?0.28 mg/L). Reports on mammals have indicated that allyl alcohol requires activation by alcohol dehydrogenases (Adh) to form the highly reactive and toxic metabolite acrolein, which shows similar toxicity in zebrafish embryos and adults. To identify if a limited metabolic capacity of embryos indeed can explain the low allyl alcohol sensitivity of zebrafish embryos, we compared the mRNA expression levels of Adh isoenzymes (adh5, adh8a, adh8b and adhfe1) during embryo development to that in adult fish. The greatest difference between embryo and adult fish was found for adh8a and adh8b expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that these genes might be required for allyl alcohol activation. Microinjection of adh8a, but not adh8b mRNA led to a significant increase of allyl alcohol toxicity in embryos similar to levels reported for adults (LC50?=?0.42 mg/L in adh8a mRNA-injected embryos). Furthermore, GC/MS analysis of adh8a-injected embryos indicated a significant decline of internal allyl alcohol concentrations from 0.23-58 ng/embryo to levels below the limit of detection (< 4.6 µg/L). Injection of neither adh8b nor gfp mRNA had an impact on internal allyl alcohol levels supporting that the increased allyl alcohol toxicity was mediated by an increase in its metabolization. These results underline the necessity to critically consider metabolic activation in the zebrafish embryo. As demonstrated here, mRNA injection is one useful approach to study the role of candidate enzymes involved in metabolization.
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Benchmarking Organic Micropollutants in Wastewater, Recycled Water and Drinking Water with In Vitro Bioassays.
Environ. Sci. Technol.
PUBLISHED: 12-26-2013
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Thousands of organic micropollutants and their transformation products occur in water. Although often present at low concentrations, individual compounds contribute to mixture effects. Cell-based bioassays that target health-relevant biological endpoints may therefore complement chemical analysis for water quality assessment. The objective of this study was to evaluate cell-based bioassays for their suitability to benchmark water quality and to assess efficacy of water treatment processes. The selected bioassays cover relevant steps in the toxicity pathways including induction of xenobiotic metabolism, specific and reactive modes of toxic action, activation of adaptive stress response pathways and system responses. Twenty laboratories applied 103 unique in vitro bioassays to a common set of 10 water samples collected in Australia, including wastewater treatment plant effluent, two types of recycled water (reverse osmosis and ozonation/activated carbon filtration), stormwater, surface water, and drinking water. Sixty-five bioassays (63%) showed positive results in at least one sample, typically in wastewater treatment plant effluent, and only five (5%) were positive in the control (ultrapure water). Each water type had a characteristic bioanalytical profile with particular groups of toxicity pathways either consistently responsive or not responsive across test systems. The most responsive health-relevant endpoints were related to xenobiotic metabolism (pregnane X and aryl hydrocarbon receptors), hormone-mediated modes of action (mainly related to the estrogen, glucocorticoid, and antiandrogen activities), reactive modes of action (genotoxicity) and adaptive stress response pathway (oxidative stress response). This study has demonstrated that selected cell-based bioassays are suitable to benchmark water quality and it is recommended to use a purpose-tailored panel of bioassays for routine monitoring.
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A European perspective on alternatives to animal testing for environmental hazard identification and risk assessment.
Regul. Toxicol. Pharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2013
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Tests with vertebrates are an integral part of environmental hazard identification and risk assessment of chemicals, plant protection products, pharmaceuticals, biocides, feed additives and effluents. These tests raise ethical and economic concerns and are considered as inappropriate for assessing all of the substances and effluents that require regulatory testing. Hence, there is a strong demand for replacement, reduction and refinement strategies and methods. However, until now alternative approaches have only rarely been used in regulatory settings. This review provides an overview on current regulations of chemicals and the requirements for animal tests in environmental hazard and risk assessment. It aims to highlight the potential areas for alternative approaches in environmental hazard identification and risk assessment. Perspectives and limitations of alternative approaches to animal tests using vertebrates in environmental toxicology, i.e. mainly fish and amphibians, are discussed. Free access to existing (proprietary) animal test data, availability of validated alternative methods and a practical implementation of conceptual approaches such as the Adverse Outcome Pathways and Integrated Testing Strategies were identified as major requirements towards the successful development and implementation of alternative approaches. Although this article focusses on European regulations, its considerations and conclusions are of global relevance.
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Transgenic (cyp19a1b-GFP) zebrafish embryos as a tool for assessing combined effects of oestrogenic chemicals.
Aquat. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 04-22-2013
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Endocrine disrupting chemicals and especially oestrogen receptor (ER) agonists have been extensively studied over the years due to their potential effects on sexual development and reproduction in vertebrates, notably fish. As ER agonists can exist as complex mixtures in the aquatic environment, evaluating the impact of combined exposure on oestrogenic effects has become increasingly important. Use of predictive models such as concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) has allowed assessment of combined estrogenic effects of complex multi-compound mixtures of ER agonists in various fish in vitro and in vivo experimental models. The present work makes use of a transgenic zebrafish strain, tg(cyp19a1b-GFP), which expresses the green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the cyp19a1b (brain aromatase or aromatase B) gene to determine the oestrogenic potency of ER agonists alone or in mixtures. In these studies, tg(cyp19a1b-GFP) zebrafish embryos were exposed for four days (from one to five days post fertilization) to five different oestrogenic chemicals; 17?-ethinylestradiol (EE2), 17?-estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), bisphenol A (BPA) and 4-tert-octylphenol (OP), and three mixtures of up to four of these compounds. The mixture of BPA, OP and E2 was also tested with primary cultures of rainbow trout hepatocytes by analysing the ER-mediated induction of the oestrogenic biomarker vitellogenin in order to compare the performance of the two methods for assessing oestrogenic effects of complex mixtures. The three tested mixtures were predominantly acting in an additive manner on the expression of GFP. Additivity was indicated by the overlap of the 95% confidence interval of the concentration response curves for the observed data with the CA and IA prediction models, and model deviation ratios within a factor of two for a majority of the mixture concentrations. However, minor deviations determined as more than additive effects for the mixture of EE2, E1 and E2 and less than additive effects for the mixture of BPA, OP, EE2 and E1 were observed at the higher mixture concentrations tested. The successful prediction of additivity by CA and IA in tg(cyp19a1b-GFP) zebrafish embryos and deviations at high mixture concentrations seemed to correspond well to results obtained in the rainbow trout hepatocyte assay. The present results clearly show the usefulness of combining predictive modelling and use of in vitro bioassays for rapid screening of oestrogenic effects of complex mixtures and environmental samples.
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An approach to creating novel anions: silylated triel compounds with -CH2- and -O- linkers, [InCl2{O(HO)Si(t-Bu)2}]2 and Li[B(CH2SiMe3)4].
Acta Crystallogr C
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2013
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Bis[?-di-tert-butyl(hydroxy)silanolato]bis[chloridoindium(III)], [In2(C8H19O2Si)2Cl4], (I), is a centrosymmetric two-centre indium complex featuring a system of three annulated four-membered rings; the structure is the first example of an In2O2 ring which is annulated with two Si-O units to form a ring system composed of three rings. The coordination environment of the In centres is a distorted trigonal bipyramid. The crystal packing of (I) is characterized by chains of molecules connected by O-H···Cl hydrogen bonds. The crystal of (I) was a nonmerohedral twin. There is no known example of an In2O2 ring in which the In atoms carry any two halogen ligands. The structure of tetrakis(tetrahydrofuran)lithium tetrakis[(trimethylsilyl)methyl]borate, [Li(C4H8O)4](C16H44BSi4), (II), is composed of discrete cations and anions. The coordination geometries of the Li and B centres is tetrahedral. The cations and anions lie in planes parallel to the ab plane. There are no short contacts between the cations and anions. Compound (II) is the first example of a B centre bonded to four -CH2Si units.
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Transcriptional response of zebrafish embryos exposed to neurotoxic compounds reveals a muscle activity dependent hspb11 expression.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-22-2011
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Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are widely used as pesticides and drugs. Their primary effect is the overstimulation of cholinergic receptors which results in an improper muscular function. During vertebrate embryonic development nerve activity and intracellular downstream events are critical for the regulation of muscle fiber formation. Whether AChE inhibitors and related neurotoxic compounds also provoke specific changes in gene transcription patterns during vertebrate development that allow them to establish a mechanistic link useful for identification of developmental toxicity pathways has, however, yet not been investigated. Therefore we examined the transcriptomic response of a known AChE inhibitor, the organophosphate azinphos-methyl (APM), in zebrafish embryos and compared the response with two non-AChE inhibiting unspecific control compounds, 1,4-dimethoxybenzene (DMB) and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP). A highly specific cluster of APM induced gene transcripts was identified and a subset of strongly regulated genes was analyzed in more detail. The small heat shock protein hspb11 was found to be the most sensitive induced gene in response to AChE inhibitors. Comparison of expression in wildtype, ache and sop(fixe) mutant embryos revealed that hspb11 expression was dependent on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activity. Furthermore, modulators of intracellular calcium levels within the whole embryo led to a transcriptional up-regulation of hspb11 which suggests that elevated intracellular calcium levels may regulate the expression of this gene. During early zebrafish development, hspb11 was specifically expressed in muscle pioneer cells and Hspb11 morpholino-knockdown resulted in effects on slow muscle myosin organization. Our findings imply that a comparative toxicogenomic approach and functional analysis can lead to the identification of molecular mechanisms and specific marker genes for potential neurotoxic compounds.
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The zebrafish embryo model in toxicology and teratology, September 2–3, 2010, Karlsruhe, Germany.
Reprod. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 07-19-2011
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The use of fish embryos is gaining popularity for research in the area of toxicology and teratology. Particularly embryos of the zebrafish offer an array of different applications ranging from regulatory testing to mechanistic research. For this reason a consortium of two research centres and a company with the support of the COST Action EuFishBiomed has organised the Workshop “The zebrafish embryo model in toxicology and teratology”, in Karlsruhe, Germany, 2nd–3rd September 2010. The workshop aimed at bringing together experts from different areas of toxicology using the (zebra)fish embryo and stimulating networking between scientists and representatives from regulatory bodies, research institutions and industry. Recent findings, presented in various platform presentations in the area of regulatory toxicity, high throughput screening, toxicogenomics, as well as environmental and human risk assessment are highlighted in this meeting report. Furthermore, the constraints and possibilities of the model as discussed at the workshop are described. A follow up-meeting was appreciated by the about 120 participants and is planned for 2012.
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Adverse outcome pathways during early fish development: a conceptual framework for identification of chemical screening and prioritization strategies.
Toxicol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2011
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The fish early life-stage (FELS) test guideline (OECD 210 or OCSPP 850.1400) is the most frequently used bioassay for predicting chronic fish toxicity and supporting aquatic ecological risk assessments around the world. For each chemical, the FELS test requires a minimum of 360 fish and 1 to 3 months from test initiation to termination. Although valuable for predicting fish full life-cycle toxicity, FELS tests are labor and resource intensive and, due to an emphasis on apical endpoints, provide little to no information about chemical mode of action. Therefore, the development and implementation of alternative testing strategies for screening and prioritizing chemicals has the potential to reduce the cost and number of animals required for estimating FELS toxicity and, at the same time, provides insights into mechanisms of toxicity. Using three reference chemicals with well-established yet distinct adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) in early life stages of fish, we proposed FELS-specific AOPs as conceptual frameworks for identifying useful chemical screening and prioritization strategies. The reference chemicals selected as case studies were a cardiotoxic aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin), neurotoxic acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (chlorpyrifos), and narcotic surfactant (linear alkylbenzene sulfonate). Using qualitative descriptions for each chemical during early fish development, we developed generalized AOPs and, based on these examples, proposed a three-tiered testing strategy for screening and prioritizing chemicals for FELS testing. Linked with biologically based concentration-response models, a tiered testing strategy may help reduce the reliance on long-term and costly FELS tests required for assessing the hazard of thousands of chemicals currently in commerce.
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The clinical presentation and surgical management of adnexal torsion in the pediatric and adolescent population.
J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol
PUBLISHED: 05-18-2011
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To determine the history, clinical presentation, physical exam, and laboratory findings of ovarian and/or tubal torsion in the pediatric and adolescent population and to examine the surgical management of adnexal torsion.
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Zebrafish embryos as an alternative to animal experiments--a commentary on the definition of the onset of protected life stages in animal welfare regulations.
Reprod. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 04-26-2011
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Worldwide, the zebrafish has become a popular model for biomedical research and (eco)toxicology. Particularly the use of embryos is receiving increasing attention, since they are considered as replacement method for animal experiments. Zebrafish embryos allow the analysis of multiple endpoints ranging from acute and developmental toxicity determination to complex functional genetic and physiological analysis. Particularly the more complex endpoints require the use of post-hatched eleutheroembryo stages. According to the new EU Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes, the earliest life-stages of animals are not defined as protected and, therefore, do not fall into the regulatory frameworks dealing with animal experimentation. Independent feeding is considered as the stage from which free-living larvae are subject to regulations for animal experimentation. However, despite this seemingly clear definition, large variations exist in the interpretation of this criterion by national and regional authorities. Since some assays require the use of post-hatched stages up to 120 h post fertilization, the literature and available data are reviewed in order to evaluate if this stage could still be considered as non-protected according to the regulatory criterion of independent feeding. Based on our analysis and by including criteria such as yolk consumption, feeding and swimming behavior, we conclude that zebrafish larvae can indeed be regarded as independently feeding from 120 h after fertilization. Experiments with zebrafish should thus be subject to regulations for animal experiments from 120 h after fertilization onwards.
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Ultramicroscopy of bone at oral implant sites: a comparison of ED and control patients. Part 1-defining the protocol.
Int J Prosthodont
PUBLISHED: 04-12-2011
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The aim of this study was to develop a protocol to analyze the microstructure of mandibular and maxillary bone in association with implant placement in ectodermal dysplasia (ED) and anodontia conditions compared to patients not suffering from such conditions.
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Surgery for portal hypertension in children.
Curr Gastroenterol Rep
PUBLISHED: 03-23-2011
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Management of children with portal hypertension has evolved considerably over the past decades. Development of physiologic shunts (meso-Rex bypass) and successful liver transplant has changed the paradigm of portal hypertension surgery. Children with pre-hepatic portal hypertension are investigated and, if suitable, candidates are offered the mesenteric-to-left portal vein bypass (meso-Rex) preemptively, before development of symptoms of portal hypertension. Aggressive medical management, endoscopic ligation of bleeding varices, and radiologically placed intrahepatic stents have greatly reduced the need for emergent surgical procedures. A larger number of surgical options offer a permanent solution for children with portal hypertension in the setting of well-compensated liver function. Portal hypertension in the setting of decompensated liver disease is managed medically (via endoscopy) or radiologically (via transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt) with the aim to offer liver transplant as a permanent solution.
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Thyroid surgery at Childrens Hospital Boston: a 35-year single-institution experience.
J. Pediatr. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2011
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Thyroidectomy is the primary therapy for thyroid cancer and an established treatment of hyperthyroidism. Because of the relative rarity of these conditions in childhood, few single-institution series exist in the pediatric literature. Here we analyze our institutions experience to assess patient demographics, operative risks, and the role of preoperative testing.
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Outcomes analysis after percutaneous abdominal drainage and exploratory laparotomy for necrotizing enterocolitis in 4,657 infants.
Pediatr. Surg. Int.
PUBLISHED: 02-23-2011
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Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a common acquired gastrointestinal disease of infancy that is strongly correlated with prematurity. Both percutaneous abdominal drainage and laparotomy with resection of diseased bowel are surgical options for treatment of NEC. The objective of the present study is to compare outcomes of patients who were treated either with bowel resection/ostomy (BR/O), percutaneous drainage (PD) or Both procedures for NEC in a retrospective analysis.
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Identification and evaluation of cyp1a transcript expression in fish as molecular biomarker for petroleum contamination in tropical fresh water ecosystems.
Aquat. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 02-03-2011
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In order to monitor potential contamination deriving from exploration and transport of oil in the Urucu region (Brazil), there is a need to establish suitable biomarkers for native Amazonian fish. Therefore, the transcript expression of various potentially sensitive genes (ahr2(1), cyp1a, hmox1, hsp70, maft, mt, nfe212, gstp1 and nqo1) in fish exposed to water soluble fractions of oil (WSF) was compared. The analysis was first performed in an established laboratory model, the zebrafish embryo. The cyp1a gene proved to be the most sensitive and robust marker for oil contamination and, hence, was selected to study the effect of oil-derived contaminants in the Amazonian cichlid Astronotus ocellatus. Induction of cyp1a transcript expression was observed for ?0.0061% (v/v) WSFs. In liver samples of fish, collected from different lakes in the Urucu oil mining area, no elevated expression of cyp1a transcripts was observed. The data demonstrate the high sensitivity of cyp1a as indicator of oil exposure; further studies should be considered to test its usefulness at known contaminated sites and to evaluate influential factors by, e.g. mesocosm experiments.
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Tungsten carbide cobalt nanoparticles exert hypoxia-like effects on the gene expression level in human keratinocytes.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2010
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Tungsten carbide (WC) and tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) nanoparticles are of occupational health relevance because of the increasing usage in hard metal industries. Earlier studies showed an enhanced toxic potential for WC-Co compared to WC or cobalt ions alone. Therefore, we investigated the impact of these particles, compared to cobalt ions applied as CoCl(2), on the global gene expression level in human keratinocytes (HaCaT) in vitro.
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Business aspects and sustainability for healthgrids - an expert survey.
Stud Health Technol Inform
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2009
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Grid computing initiatives in medicine and life sciences are under pressure to prove their sustainability. While some first business model frameworks were outlined, few practical experiences were considered. This gap has been narrowed by an international survey of 33 grid computing experts with biomedical and non-biomedical background on business aspects. The experts surveyed were cautiously optimistic about a sustainable implementation of grid computing within a mid term timeline. They identified marketable application areas, stated the underlying value proposition, outlined trends and specify critical success factors. From a general perspective of their answers, they provided a stable basis for a road map of sustainable grid computing solutions for medicine and life sciences.
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Economic performance and sustainability of HealthGrids: evidence from two case studies.
Stud Health Technol Inform
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2009
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Financial sustainability is not a driving force of HealthGrids today, as a previous desk research survey of 22 international HealthGrid projects has showed. The majority of applications are project based, which puts a time limit of funding, but also of goals and objectives. Given this situation, we analysed two initiatives, WISDOM and MammoGrid from an economic, cost-benefit perspective, and evaluated the potential for these initiatives to be brought to market as self-financing, sustainable services. We conclude that the topic of HealthGrids should be pursued further because of the substantial potential for net gains to society at large. The most significant hurdle to sustainability - the discrepancy between social benefits and private incentives - can be solved by sound business models.
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Toxicity of tungsten carbide and cobalt-doped tungsten carbide nanoparticles in mammalian cells in vitro.
Environ. Health Perspect.
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2009
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Tungsten carbide nanoparticles are being explored for their use in the manufacture of hard metals. To develop nanoparticles for broad applications, potential risks to human health and the environment should be evaluated and taken into consideration.
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Gene expression analysis in zebrafish embryos: a potential approach to predict effect concentrations in the fish early life stage test.
Environ. Toxicol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2009
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Based on the hypothesis that analysis of gene expression could be used to predict chronic fish toxicity, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo test (DarT), developed as a replacement method for the acute fish test, was expanded to a gene expression D. rerio embryo test (Gene-DarT). The effects of 14 substances on lethal and sublethal endpoints of the DarT and on expression of potential marker genes were investigated: the aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2, cytochrome P450 1A (cypla), heat shock protein 70, fizzy-related protein 1, the transcription factors v-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene family protein g (avian) 1 and NF-E2-p45-related factor, and heme oxygenase 1 (hmox1). After exposure of zebrafish embryos for 48 h, differential gene expression was evaluated using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, gel electrophoresis, and densitometric analysis of the gels. All tested compounds significantly affected the expression of at least one potential marker gene, with cyp1a and hmox1 being most sensitive. Lowest-observed-effect concentrations (LOECs) for gene expression were below concentrations resulting in 10% lethal effects in the DarT. For 10 (3,4- and 3,5-dichloroaniline, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, 2,4-dinitrophenol, atrazine, parathion-ethyl, chlorotoluron, genistein, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide, and cadmium) out of the 14 tested substances, LOEC values derived with the Gene-DarT differ by a factor of less than 10 from LOEC values of fish early life stage tests with zebrafish. For pentachloroaniline and pentachlorobenzene, the Gene-DarT showed a 23- and 153-fold higher sensitivity, respectively, while for lindane, it showed a 13-fold lower sensitivity. For ivermectin, the Gene-DarT was by a factor of more than 1,000 less sensitive than the acute fish test. The results of the present study indicate that gene expression analysis in zebrafish embryos could principally be used to predict effect concentrations in the fish early life stage test.
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Synthesis and biological evaluation of SANT-2 and analogues as inhibitors of the hedgehog signaling pathway.
Bioorg. Med. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 04-03-2009
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Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays an important role in cell signaling of embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. In vertebrates, the hh gene encodes three different unique proteins: sonic hedgehog (Shh), desert hedgehog (Dhh) and indian hedgehog (Ihh). Disruption of the Hh signaling pathway leads to severe disorders in the development of vertebrates whereas aberrant activation of the Hh pathway has been associated with several malignancies including Gorlin syndrome (a disorder predisposing to basal cell carcinoma, medulloblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma), prostate, pancreatic and breast cancers. In vivo evidence suggests the antagonism of excessive Hh signaling provides a route to unique mechanism-based anti-cancer therapies. Recently the small molecule SANT-2 was identified as a potent antagonist of Hh-signaling pathway. Here, we describe the synthesis, SAR studies as well as biological evaluation of SANT-2 and its analogues. Fifteen SANT-2 derivatives were synthesized and analyzed for their interference with the expression of the Hh target gene Gli1 in a reporter gene assay. By comparison of structure and activity important molecular descriptors for Gli inhibition could be identified. Furthermore we identified derivative TC-132 that was slightly more potent than the parent compound SANT-2. Selected compounds were tested for Hh related teratogenic effects in the small teleost model medaka. Albeit Gli expression has indicated a 16-fold higher Hh-inhibiting activity than observed for the plant alkaloid cyclopamine, none of the tested compounds were able to induce the cyclopamine-specific phenotype in the medaka assay.
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Agglomeration of tungsten carbide nanoparticles in exposure medium does not prevent uptake and toxicity toward a rainbow trout gill cell line.
Aquat. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2009
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Due to their increased production and use, engineered nanoparticles are expected to be released into the aquatic environment where particles may agglomerate. The aim of this study was to explore the role of agglomeration of nanoparticles in the uptake and expression of toxicity in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gill cell line, RTgill-W1. This cell line was chosen as model because it is known to be amenable to culture in complete as well as greatly simplified exposure media. Nano-sized tungsten carbide (WC) with or without cobalt doping (WC-Co), two materials relevant in the heavy metal industry, were applied as model particles. These particles were suspended in culture media with decreasing complexity from L15 with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) to L15 to L15/ex, containing only salts, galactose and pyruvate of the complete medium L15. Whereas the serum supplement in L15 retained primary nanoparticle suspensions, agglomerates were formed quickly in L15 and L15/ex. Nevertheless, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) elemental analysis revealed an uptake of both WC and WC-Co nanoparticles into RTgill-W1 cells irrespective of the state of agglomeration of nanoparticles. The localisation seemed to be restricted to the cytoplasm, as no particles were observed in the nucleus of cells. Moreover, reduction in cell viability between 10 and 50% compared to controls were observed upon particle exposure in all media although the pattern of impact varied depending on the medium and exposure time. Short-term exposure of cells led to significant cytotoxicity at the highest nominal particle concentrations, irrespective of the particle type or exposure medium. In contrast, long-term exposures led to preferential toxicity in the simplest medium, L15/ex, and an enhanced toxicity by the cobalt-containing WC nanoparticles in all exposure media. The composition of the exposure media also influenced the toxicity of the cobalt ions, which may dissolve from the WC-Co nanoparticles, with cells reacting much more sensitively toward cobalt ions in the absence of FBS. However, the toxicity observed by ionic cobalt alone did not explain the toxicity of the WC-Co nanoparticles, suggesting that the combination of metallic Co and WC is the cause of the increased particle toxicity of WC-Co. Taken together, our findings indicate that minimal exposure media can lead to rapid agglomeration of nanoparticles but that agglomeration does not prevent uptake into cells and the expression of toxicity.
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Predicting adult fish acute lethality with the zebrafish embryo: relevance of test duration, endpoints, compound properties, and exposure concentration analysis.
Environ. Sci. Technol.
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The zebrafish embryo toxicity test has been proposed as an alternative for the acute fish toxicity test, which is required by various regulations for environmental risk assessment of chemicals. We investigated the reliability of the embryo test by probing organic industrial chemicals with a wide range of physicochemical properties, toxicities, and modes of toxic action. Moreover, the relevance of using measured versus nominal (intended) exposure concentrations, inclusion of sublethal endpoints, and different exposure durations for the comparability with reported fish acute toxicity was explored. Our results confirm a very strong correlation of zebrafish embryo to fish acute toxicity. When toxicity values were calculated based on measured exposure concentrations, the slope of the type II regression line was 1 and nearly passed through the origin (1 to 1 correlation). Measured concentrations also explained several apparent outliers. Neither prolonged exposure (up to 120 h) nor consideration of sublethal effects led to a reduced number of outliers. Yet, two types of compounds were less lethal to embryos than to adult fish: a neurotoxic compound acting via sodium channels (permethrin) and a compound requiring metabolic activation (allyl alcohol).
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Mixture toxicity revisited from a toxicogenomic perspective.
Environ. Sci. Technol.
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The advent of new genomic techniques has raised expectations that central questions of mixture toxicology such as for mechanisms of low dose interactions can now be answered. This review provides an overview on experimental studies from the past decade that address diagnostic and/or mechanistic questions regarding the combined effects of chemical mixtures using toxicogenomic techniques. From 2002 to 2011, 41 studies were published with a focus on mixture toxicity assessment. Primarily multiplexed quantification of gene transcripts was performed, though metabolomic and proteomic analysis of joint exposures have also been undertaken. It is now standard to explicitly state criteria for selecting concentrations and provide insight into data transformation and statistical treatment with respect to minimizing sources of undue variability. Bioinformatic analysis of toxicogenomic data, by contrast, is still a field with diverse and rapidly evolving tools. The reported combined effect assessments are discussed in the light of established toxicological dose-response and mixture toxicity models. Receptor-based assays seem to be the most advanced toward establishing quantitative relationships between exposure and biological responses. Often transcriptomic responses are discussed based on the presence or absence of signals, where the interpretation may remain ambiguous due to methodological problems. The majority of mixture studies design their studies to compare the recorded mixture outcome against responses for individual components only. This stands in stark contrast to our existing understanding of joint biological activity at the levels of chemical target interactions and apical combined effects. By joining established mixture effect models with toxicokinetic and -dynamic thinking, we suggest a conceptual framework that may help to overcome the current limitation of providing mainly anecdotal evidence on mixture effects. To achieve this we suggest (i) to design studies to establish quantitative relationships between dose and time dependency of responses and (ii) to adopt mixture toxicity models. Moreover, (iii) utilization of novel bioinformatic tools and (iv) stress response concepts could be productive to translate multiple responses into hypotheses on the relationships between general stress and specific toxicity reactions of organisms.
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Transcriptional responses of zebrafish embryos exposed to potential sonic hedgehog pathway interfering compounds deviate from expression profiles of cyclopamine.
Reprod. Toxicol.
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The molecular responses of two small molecules, SANT-2 and GANT-61, potentially interfering with the sonic hedgehog pathway (Shh) have been studied in zebrafish embryos by microarray analysis. For both compounds and the positive reference cyclopamine previous reporter gene assays for the transcription factor Gli1 have indicated an inhibition of the hedgehog signaling pathway. In zebrafish embryos a typical phenotype (cyclopia) associated with Shh interference was only observed for cyclopamine. Furthermore, only cyclopamine led to the repression of genes specifically associated with hedgehog signaling and confirmed published microarray data. In contrast to these data hspb11 was additionally identified as the most pronounced down-regulated genes for exposure to cyclopamine. No or different effects on gene expression patterns were provoked by SANT-2 or GANT-61, respectively. Reasons for the discrepancies between cellular reporter and the zebrafish embryo assay and potential implications for the identification of compounds interfering with specific developmental pathways are discussed.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.