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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Repeated psychosocial stress at night, but not day, affects the central molecular clock.
Chronobiol. Int.
PUBLISHED: 07-22-2014
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We have recently demonstrated that the outcome of repeated social defeat (SD) on behavior, physiology and immunology is more negative when applied during the dark/active phase as compared with the light/inactive phase of male C57BL/6 mice. Here, we investigated the effects of the same stress paradigm, which combines a psychosocial and novelty stressor, on the circadian clock in transgenic PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE (PER2::LUC) and wildtype (WT) mice by subjecting them to repeated SD, either in the early light phase (social defeat light?=?SDL) or in the early dark phase (social defeat dark?=?SDD) across 19 days. The PER2::LUC rhythms and clock gene mRNA expression were analyzed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the adrenal gland, and PER2 protein expression in the SCN was assessed. SDD mice showed increased PER2::LUC rhythm amplitude in the SCN, reduced Per2 and Cryptochrome1 mRNA expression in the adrenal gland, and increased PER2 protein expression in the posterior part of the SCN compared with single-housed control (SHC) and SDL mice. In contrast, PER2::LUC rhythms in the SCN of SDL mice were not affected. However, SDL mice exhibited a 2-hour phase advance of the PER2::LUC rhythm in the adrenal gland compared to SHC mice. Furthermore, plasma levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and BDNF mRNA in the SCN were elevated in SDL mice. Taken together, these results show that the SCN molecular rhythmicity is affected by repeated SDD, but not SDL, while the adrenal peripheral clock is influenced mainly by SDL. The observed increase in BDNF in the SDL group may act to protect against the negative consequences of repeated psychosocial stress.
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Dose-dependent effects of chronic central infusion of oxytocin on anxiety, oxytocin receptor binding and stress-related parameters in mice.
Psychoneuroendocrinology
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2014
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Chronic psychosocial stress is a recognized risk factor for various affective and somatic disorders. In an established murine model of chronic psychosocial stress, exposure to chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC) results in an alteration of physiological, behavioral, neuroendocrine and immunological parameters, including a long-lasting increase in anxiety, adrenal hypertrophy and thymus atrophy. Based on the stress-protective and anxiolytic properties of oxytocin (OXT) after acute administration in rodents and humans, the major aims of our study were to assess whether chronic administration of OXT dose-dependently affects the behavior and physiology of male mice, as for therapeutic use in humans, mostly chronic treatment approaches will be used. Further, we studied, whether chronic administration during CSC prevents stress-induced consequences. Our results indicate that chronic intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of OXT (15 days) at high (10ng/h), but not at low (1ng/h) dose, induces an anxiogenic phenotype with a concomitant reduction of OXT receptor (OXTR) binding within the septum, the basolateral and medial amygdala, as well as the median raphe nucleus. Further, we demonstrate that chronic ICV infusion of OXT (1ng/h) during a 19-day CSC exposure prevents the hyper-anxiety, thymus atrophy, adrenal hypertrophy, and decreased in vitro adrenal ACTH sensitivity. Thus, given both negative, but also beneficial effects seen after chronic OXT treatment, which appear to be dose-dependent, a deeper understanding of long-lasting treatment effects is required before OXT can be considered for long-term therapeutic use for the treatment of psychopathologies such as autism, schizophrenia or anxiety-disorders.
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Stress resilience: a low-anxiety genotype protects male mice from the consequences of chronic psychosocial stress.
Endocrinology
PUBLISHED: 12-20-2013
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Chronic psychosocial stress is a risk factor for the development of affective as well as somatic disorders. However, vulnerability to adverse stress effects varies between individuals, with previous negative life events along with genetic predisposition playing a major role. In support, we previously showed that the consequences of chronic psychosocial stress induced by chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC, 19 days) can be amplified by pre-exposing mice to repeated maternal separation during early life. To test the significance of the genetic predisposition on the effects of CSC, mice selectively bred for high (mHAB) and low (mLAB) anxiety-related behavior and nonselected CD1 mice (mNAB) were exposed to CSC in the present study. In confirmation of our previous results, CSC mice of both mHAB and mNAB lines displayed chronic stress-related symptoms including increased adrenal weight, decreased adrenal in vitro ACTH sensitivity, lower plasma corticosterone to ACTH ratio, and increased interferon-? secretion from isolated mesenteric lymph node cells compared with single-housed controls of the respective line. However, the CSC-induced anxiogenic effect found in mNAB was not confirmed in mHAB mice, possibly due to a ceiling effect in these highly anxious mice. Interestingly, mHAB were not more vulnerable to CSC than mNAB mice, whereas mLAB mice were resilient to CSC as indicated by all of the above mentioned parameters assessed. Taken together, our findings indicate that the genetic predisposition, in this case the innate anxiety of an individual, affects vulnerability to chronic psychosocial stress, with a low-anxiety phenotype mediating resilience to both affective and somatic consequences of CSC.
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Short-term psychosocial stress protects photoreceptors from damage via corticosterone-mediated activation of the AKT pathway.
Exp. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2013
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Apoptotic death of photoreceptors in hereditary retinal degenerations can be prevented by neuroprotective molecules. Here, we report that adrenal glucocorticoids (GC) released during psychosocial stress protect photoreceptors from apoptosis after light damage. Psychosocial stress is known to be the main type of stressor humans are exposed to and was induced here in mice by 10h of chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC). Photoreceptor damage was generated by subsequent exposure to white light. Short-term psychosocial stress prior to illumination significantly reduced the number of apoptotic photoreceptors, an effect that was absent in adrenalectomized (ADX) mice. The neuroprotective effect was completely restored in ADX mice substituted with GC. Moreover, phosphorylation of retinal AKT increased following CSC or exogenous GC treatment, an effect that was again absent in ADX mice exposed to CSC. Finally, inhibition of AKT signaling with triciribine blocked the stress- and GC-mediated neuroprotective effects on photoreceptors. In summary, we provide evidence that 1) short-term psychosocial stress protects photoreceptors from light-induced damage and 2) the protective effect is most likely mediated by GC-induced activation of the AKT signaling pathway.
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Chronic psychosocial stress in male mice causes an up-regulation of scavenger receptor class B type 1 protein in the adrenal glands.
Stress
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2013
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Mice exposed to chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC, 19 days) show an exaggerated adrenal corticosterone response to an acute heterotypic stressor (elevated platform (EPF), 5?min) despite no difference from EPF-exposed single-housed control (SHC) mice in corticotropin (ACTH) secretion. In the present study, we asked the question whether this CSC-induced increase in adrenal capability to produce and secrete corticosterone is paralleled by an enhanced adrenal availability and/or mobilization capacity of the corticosterone precursor molecule cholesterol. Employing oil-red staining and western blot analysis we revealed comparable relative density of cortical lipid droplets and relative protein expression of hormone-sensitive lipase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) between CSC and SHC mice. However, relative protein expression of the scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-BI) was increased following CSC exposure. Moreover, analysis of plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) revealed increased LDL-C levels in CSC mice. Together with the pronounced increase in adrenal weight, evidently mediated by hyperplasia of adrenocortical cells, these data strongly indicate an enhanced adrenal availability of and capacity to mobilize cholesterol in chronic psychosocially-stressed mice, contributing to their increased in vivo corticosterone response during acute heterotypic stressor exposure.
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Mechanisms Underlying the Increased Plasma ACTH Levels in Chronic Psychosocially Stressed Male Mice.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Mice exposed to chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC, 19 days), an established paradigm for chronic psychosocial stress, show unaffected basal morning plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentrations, despite enlarged adrenal glands and an increased CORT response to an acute heterotypic stressor. In the present study we investigate the mechanisms underlying these phenomena at the level of the pituitary. We show that both basal and acute stressor-induced (forced swim (FS), 6 min) plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) concentrations, the number of total and corticotroph pituitary cells, and relative protein expression of pituitary mineralocorticoid receptor and FK506-binding protein 51 was increased in CSC compared with single-housed control (SHC) mice, while relative corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) receptor 1 (CRH-R1) and glucocorticoid receptor protein expression was down-regulated. Relative pituitary pro-opiomelanocortin and arginine vasopressin (AVP) receptor 1b (AVPR-1b) protein expression, FS (6 min)-induced ACTH secretion in dexamethasone-blocked mice, and the number of AVP positive magnocellular and parvocellular neurons in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN) was unaffected following CSC. Taken together, the data of the present study indicate that 19 days of CSC result in pituitary hyperactivity, under both basal and acute heterotypic stress conditions. Although further studies have to assess this in detail, an increased number of pituitary corticotrophs together with unaffected relative pituitary AVPR-1b and decreased CRH-R1 protein expression following CSC suggests that pituitary hyperdrive is mediated by newly formed corticotrophs that are more sensitive to AVP than CRH. Moreover, our data indicate that changes in PVN AVP and negative feedback inhibition seem not to play a major role in pituitary hyperactivity following CSC.
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Effect of chronic psychosocial stress on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in mice.
Int J Clin Exp Pathol
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by hepatic lipid accumulation which may progress towards inflammation (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)). NAFLD is regarded as a consequence of a sedentary, food-abundant lifestyle which, in the modern world, often coincides with chronically high levels of perceived psychosocial stress. Here, we aimed to characterize the effect of chronic psychosocial stress on the development of NAFLD/NASH in male mice either fed with standard chow or NASH-inducing high fat diet. Chronic psychosocial stress was induced by chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC), a pre-clinically validated paradigm relevant for human affective and somatic disorders. Single housed (SHC) mice served as controls. Under standard chow conditions CSC mice revealed lower hepatic triglyceride levels but higher hepatic TNF?, MCP-1 and HMOX mRNA expression, while serum transaminase levels did not significantly differ from SHC mice. Under the NASH-inducing high-fat diet CSC and SHC mice showed similar body weight-gain and serum levels of glucose and adiponectin. Moreover, liver histology as well as TNF?, MCP-1 and HMOX expression were similar in CSC and SHC mice fed with HFD. Surprisingly, CSC showed even significantly lower transaminase levels than SHC mice fed with the same NASH-inducing diet. Together, these data indicate that under normal dietary conditions the CSC model induces noticeable hepatic oxidative stress and inflammation without causing manifest hepatocellular injury. In contrast, CSC exhibited a protective effect on hepatocellular injury in a dietary NASH-model. Identification of the underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to prevent progression of NAFLD.
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HPA axis changes during the initial phase of psychosocial stressor exposure in male mice.
J. Endocrinol.
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Chronic subordinate colony (CSC) housing for 19 days results in unaffected basal morning corticosterone (CORT) levels despite a pronounced increase in adrenal mass, likely mediated by an attenuation of adrenal corticotropin (ACTH) responsiveness. Given that the pronounced increase in basal morning plasma CORT levels returns to baseline as early as 48?h after the start of CSC, it is likely that the attenuated ACTH responsiveness develops already during this initial phase. This was tested in the present study. In line with previous findings, basal morning plasma CORT levels were elevated following 10?h, but not 48?h, of CSC exposure. Basal morning plasma ACTH concentrations and relative in vivo adrenal CORT content were increased following 10?h and to a lesser extent following 48?h of CSC exposure, positively correlating. Relative in vitro adrenal CORT secretion in response to ACTH (100?nM) and kidney protein expression of 11?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (HSD11B2) were unaffected following both time points. Adrenal mRNA expression of key steroidogenic enzymes was unaffected/decreased following 10?h and unaffected/increased following 48?h of CSC exposure. Together, our findings suggest that basal plasma hypercorticism during the initial CSC phase is mainly prevented by an attenuation of pituitary ACTH release. An increased absolute adrenal weight following 10?h, but not 48?h, of CSC exposure indicates that restoration of normal adrenal mass also adds to a lesser extent to prevent basal hypercorticism. A contributing role of alterations in enzymatic CORT degradation and steroidogenic enzyme availability is likely, but has to be further addressed in future studies.
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Chronic psychosocial stress increases the risk for inflammation-related colon carcinogenesis in male mice.
Stress
PUBLISHED: 12-20-2011
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Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) have a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC) than the general population. Furthermore, chronic psychosocial stress increases the likelihood of developing IBD and multiple types of malignant neoplasms, including CRC. Here, for the first time, we investigate the effects of chronic psychosocial stress in male mice on an artificially induced CRC, by employing the chronic subordinate colony (CSC) housing paradigm in combination with the reliable azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) CRC model. Colonoscopy revealed that CSC mice showed accelerated macroscopic suspect lesions. In addition, more CSC mice developed low-grade dysplasia (LGD) and/or high-grade dysplasia (HGD) in the colonic tissue compared to the single-housed control mice (SHC). CSC mice showed an increased number of Ki67+ and a decreased number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling epithelial cells in colonic tissue. Colonic liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1), cyclooxygenase II (COXII), tumor necrosis factor, forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) mRNA as well as colonic ß-catenin, COXII, and LRH-1 protein expression were also increased in CSC compared with SHC mice. Although the number of CD4+ Th cells was increased, a tendency toward a decreased colonic interferon-? (IFN-?) mRNA expression was observed. Furthermore, despite an increased percentage of CD3+ cells and CD3+/FoxP3+ double-positive cells within mesenteric lymph node cells of CSC mice, IFN-? secretion from these cells was unaffected. Altogether, our results suggest that chronic psychosocial stress increases the risk for AOM/DSS-induced and, thus, inflammation-related CRC. Finally, assessment of additional time points may test whether the shift from tumor-protective Th1 cell to regulatory T-cell immunity represents a consequence of increased carcinogenesis or a causal factor involved in its development.
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Advanced APCVD-processes for high-temperature grown crystalline silicon thin film solar cells.
J Nanosci Nanotechnol
PUBLISHED: 11-22-2011
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Crystalline silicon thin film (cSiTF) solar cells based on the epitaxial wafer-equivalent (EpiWE) concept combine advantages of wafer-based and thin film silicon solar cells. In this paper two processes beyond the standard process sequence for cSiTF cell fabrication are described. The first provides an alternative to wet chemical saw damage removal by chemical vapor etching (CVE) with hydrogen chloride in-situ prior to epitaxial deposition. This application decreases the number of process and handling steps. Solar cells fabricated with different etching processes achieved efficiencies up to 14.7%. 1300 degrees C etching temperature led to better cell results than 1200 degrees C. The second investigated process aims for an improvement of cell efficiency by implementation of a reflecting interlayer between substrate and active solar cell. Some characteristics of epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) of a patterned silicon dioxide film in a lab-type reactor constructed at Fraunhofer ISE are described and first solar cell results are presented.
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Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of 3C-SiC for silicon thin-film solar cells on various substrates.
J Nanosci Nanotechnol
PUBLISHED: 11-22-2011
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The production of crystalline silicon thin-film solar cells on cost effective ceramic substrates depends on a highly reliable diffusion barrier to separate the light absorbing layers from the substrate. Ideally this intermediate layer should be deposited with cost effective techniques, be conductive and should feature optical confinement. Furthermore the intermediate layer should withstand high temperatures and harsh chemical environments like they occur during solar cell processing. Especially stability against oxidizing solvents like HNO3 or inactivity during e.g., oxide removing steps with HF is required. Crystalline silicon carbide (c-SiC) deposited by atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (APCVD) can match all those requirements and additionally fits the thermal properties of crystalline silicon. The c-SiC intermediate layer is deposited from methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) and H2 at 1100 degrees C. Under these conditions, growth of solely cubic 3C-SiC could be observed by X-ray diffraction measurements. Use of such intermediate layers during high temperature steps prevents diffusion of transition metals, originating from the substrates, into active silicon layers. Doping of these 3C-SiC layers with nitrogen results in specific resistivity of less than 100 ohms cm. The different potentially cost-effective substrates are made from graphite, crystalline silicon, sintered silicon carbide and sintered zircon (ZrSiO4). Surface properties of the coated substrates were investigated, explaining changes in surface roughness and influences on the solar cell processing.
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In-line silicon epitaxy for photovoltaics using a continous chemical vapour deposition reactor.
J Nanosci Nanotechnol
PUBLISHED: 11-22-2011
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Thin film solar cell techniques can effectively reduce the costs for photovoltaic solar power. However, most of these techniques still have the disadvantage of a comparatively low efficiency. One way to realize a thin film solar cell concept with high efficiency potential is the crystalline silicon thin-film (cSiTF) concept. Following the high-temperature approach, this concept is based on a silicon epitaxy process. This paper reports the current status of the development of a high throughput epitaxy tool at Fraunhofer ISE and presents first results. Also presented is the development of a simulation tool which is a virtual image of the real setup in order to forecast save deposition conditions. The presented epitaxy tool is the ConCVD (Continuous Chemical Vapour Deposition), in which an improved reactor setup has been installed, based on the experience gained so far. To provide insight into upcoming further advances, the industrial scale epitaxy tool ProConCVD is presented as well.
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Exposure to chronic pregnancy stress reverses peripartum-associated adaptations: implications for postpartum anxiety and mood disorders.
Endocrinology
PUBLISHED: 08-16-2011
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Maternal adaptations, such as decreased anxiety and attenuated stress responsiveness, are necessary to enable successful postnatal development of the offspring. However, there is growing evidence that they are also required to protect the mental health of the mother and that exposure to chronic stress during pregnancy may prevent such adaptations. Overcrowding stress (24 h) and restraint stress (2 × 1 h) were employed on alternate days between pregnancy d 4-16 to examine the impact of chronic pregnancy stress on relevant behavioral, neuroendocrine, and neuronal peripartum adaptations. To determine whether the chronic stress-induced alterations were specific to the peripartum period, we included virgins as controls. Validating the stress procedure, we demonstrated decreased body-weight gain and increased adrenal weight in stressed dams, relative to their nonstressed controls. Chronic stress prevented a number of peripartum adaptations, including basal plasma hypercorticosterone levels, increased oxytocin mRNA expression in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, and anxiolysis. However, chronic stress did not prevent the peripartum-associated decrease in CRH mRNA expression or attenuate corticosterone response to an acute stressor, nor did it affect hypothalamic vasopressin mRNA expression. Illustrating the specificity of these stress-induced changes to the peripartum period, none of these parameters were affected in stressed virgins. Although chronic stress did not alter depression-related behavior, it reversed the response to acute imipramine treatment and increased active maternal behavior in lactation. Thus, prevention of the peripartum-associated increases in basal corticosterone and oxytocin system activity by pregnancy stress reveal two alterations that may increase the risk of postpartum psychiatric disorders, particularly anxiety.
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Behavioural consequences of two chronic psychosocial stress paradigms: anxiety without depression.
Psychoneuroendocrinology
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2011
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Chronic stress, in particular chronic psychosocial stress, is a risk factor in the aetiology of various psychopathologies including anxiety- and depression-related disorders. Therefore, recent studies have focussed on the development of social-stress paradigms, which are believed to be more relevant to the human situation than non-social-stress paradigms. The majority of these paradigms have been reported to increase both anxiety- and depression-related behaviour in rats or mice. However, in order to dissect the mechanisms underlying anxiety or depression, animal models are needed, which specifically induce one, or the other, phenotype. Here, we study both short- (1d after stressor termination) and long-term (4d or 7d after stressor termination) behavioural and physiological consequences of two well-validated chronic psychosocial stress models: social-defeat/overcrowding (SD/OC) and chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC). We demonstrate that SD/OC and CSC result in different physiological alterations: SD/OC more strongly affecting body-weight development, whereas CSC more strongly affects adrenal and pituitary morphology. Both stressors were shown to flatten circadian locomotor activity immediately after stress termination, which normalized 7d later in SD/OC group but reversed to hyperactivity during the dark phase in the CSC group. Importantly, neither stress paradigm resulted in an increase in depression-related behaviour as assessed using the forced swim test, tail suspension test and saccharin preference test at any time-point. However, both stress paradigms lead to an anxiogenic phenotype; albeit with different temporal profiles and not towards a novel con-specific (social anxiety). CSC exposure elevates anxiety-related behaviour immediately after stressor termination, which lasts for at least 1 wk. In contrast, the anxiogenic phenotype only develops 1 wk after SD/OC termination. In conclusion, both models are unique for uncovering the molecular underpinnings of anxiety-related behaviour without conflicting depression-based alterations.
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The neuropeptide oxytocin facilitates pro-social behavior and prevents social avoidance in rats and mice.
Neuropsychopharmacology
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2011
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Social avoidance and social phobia are core symptoms of various psychopathologies but their underlying etiology remains poorly understood. Therefore, this study aims to reveal pro-social effects of the neuropeptide oxytocin (OT), under both basal and stress-induced social avoidance conditions in rodents using a social preference paradigm. We initially show that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) application of an OT receptor antagonist (OTR-A) in naïve male rats (0.75??g/5??l), or mice (20??g/2??l), reduced social exploration of a novel con-specific indicative of attenuated social preference. Previous exposure of male rats to a single social defeat resulted in loss of their social preference and social avoidance, which could be restored by i.c.v. infusion of synthetic OT (0.1??g/5??l) 20?min before the social preference test. Although the amygdala has been implicated in both social and OT-mediated actions, bilateral OTR-A (0.1??g/1??l) or OT (0.01??g/1??l) administration into various subnuclei of the amygdala did not affect basal or stress-induced social preference behavior, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the social specificity of these OT-mediated effects by showing that neither an arginine vasopressin V1a receptor antagonist (0.75??g/5??l, i.c.v.) nor the anxiogenic drug pentylenetetrazol (15?mg/kg, i.p.) altered social preference, with OTR-A not affecting non-social anxiety on the elevated plus-maze. Overall, the data indicate that the basal activity of the endogenous brain OT system is sufficient to promote natural occurring social preference in rodents while synthetic OT shows potential to reverse stress-induced social avoidance and might thus be of use for treating social phobia and social dysfunction in humans.
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Mucosal immunosuppression and epithelial barrier defects are key events in murine psychosocial stress-induced colitis.
Brain Behav. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2011
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Chronic psychosocial stress is a risk factor for many affective and somatic disorders, including inflammatory bowel diseases. In support chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC, 19 days), an established mouse model of chronic psychosocial stress, causes the development of spontaneous colitis. However, the mechanisms underlying the development of such stress-induced colitis are poorly understood. Assessing several functional levels of the colon during the initial stress phase, we show a pronounced adrenal hormone-mediated local immune suppression, paralleled by impaired intestinal barrier functions, resulting in enhanced bacterial load in stool and colonic tissue. Moreover, prolonged treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics revealed the causal role of these early maladaptations in the development of stress-induced colitis. Together, we demonstrate that translocation of commensal bacteria is crucial in the initiation of stress-induced colonic inflammation. However, aggravation by the immune-modulatory effects of fluctuating levels of adrenal hormones is required to develop this into a full-blown colitis.
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Chronic psychosocial stress promotes systemic immune activation and the development of inflammatory Th cell responses.
Brain Behav. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 04-28-2010
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Recent studies indicate that chronic psychosocial stress favors the development of generalized immune dysfunction. During stressor exposure neuroendocrine factors affect numbers and functionality of leukocytes. However, the exact mechanisms leading to systemic changes in immune functions during stress are still not clear. During chronic subordinate colony housing, a model of chronic psychosocial stress, mice developed spontaneous colonic inflammation. Decreased glucocorticoid signaling, induced by a combination of adrenal insufficiency and glucocorticoid resistance, was thought to prevent tempering of local immune cells, and to promote tissue inflammation. In this study we investigated changes in the systemic immune status after chronic subordinate colony housing and analyzed potential mechanisms underlying those alterations. Analysis of T helper cell subsets in peripheral lymph nodes revealed a reduction of regulatory T cells, accompanied by increased T cell effector functions. Generalized activation of T cells was shown by elevated cytokine production upon stimulation. In addition, we observed no apparent shift towards T helper type 2 responses. It is likely, that the previously reported hypocorticism in this stress model led to a steady production of inflammatory Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines and obstructed the shift towards an anti-inflammatory response. In conclusion, we established chronic subordinate colony housing as a model to investigate the outcome of stress on the systemic immune status. We also provide evidence that distinct T helper cell subtypes react differentially to the suppressive effect of glucocorticoids.
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Chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC) as a model of chronic psychosocial stress in male rats.
PLoS ONE
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Chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC) is an adequate and reliable mouse model of chronic psychosocial stress, resulting in reduced body weight gain, reduced thymus and increased adrenal weight, long-lasting anxiety-like behaviour, and spontaneous colitis. Furthermore, CSC mice show increased corticotrophin (ACTH) responsiveness to acute heterotypic stressors, suggesting a general mechanism which allows a chronically-stressed organism to adequately respond to a novel threat. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to extend the CSC model to another rodent species, namely male Wistar rats, and to characterize relevant physiological, immunological, and behavioural consequences; placing particular emphasis on changes in hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responsiveness to an acute heterotypic stressor. In line with previous mouse data, exposure of Wistar rats to 19 days of CSC resulted in a decrease in body weight gain and absolute thymus mass, mild colonic barrier defects and intestinal immune activation. Moreover, no changes in stress-coping behaviour or social preference were seen; again in agreement with the mouse paradigm. Most importantly, CSC rats showed an increased plasma corticosterone response to an acute heterotypic stressor (open arm, 5 min) despite displaying similar basal levels and similar basal and stressor-induced plasma ACTH levels. In contrast to CSC mice, anxiety-related behaviour and absolute, as well as relative adrenal weights remained unchanged in CSC rats. In summary, the CSC paradigm could be established as an adequate model of chronic psychosocial stress in male rats. Our data further support the initial hypothesis that adrenal hyper-responsiveness to ACTH during acute heterotypic stressors represents a general adaptation, which enables a chronically-stressed organism to adequately respond to novel challenges.
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Differential effects of baclofen and oxytocin on the increased ethanol consumption following chronic psychosocial stress in mice.
Addict Biol
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Chronic stress is known to enhance the susceptibility for addiction disorders including alcoholism. While these findings have been recapitulated in animal models, the majority of these studies have utilized non-social rather than social stress paradigms; the latter of which are believed to be more relevant to the human situation. Therefore, the major aim of this study was to investigate, if 14 days of chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC), a pre-clinically validated psychosocial stress paradigm relevant for human psychiatric and somatic disorders, enhances ethanol (EtOH) consumption in male mice. To assess this, we employed the well-established two-bottle free-choice paradigm where mice were given access to water and 2, 4, 6 and 8% EtOH solutions (with the concentrations increasing each fourth day) following termination of the stress procedure. After 14 days of CSC, stressed mice consumed significantly more EtOH at all concentrations tested and displayed increased EtOH preference at concentrations of 6 and 8%. This effect was not due to an altered taste preference in CSC mice as assessed by saccharine- and quinine-preference tests, but was accompanied by increased anxiety-related behavior. Systemic administration of baclofen (2.5 mg/kg) or oxytocin (OXT; 10 mg/kg) reduced the EtOH intake in single housed control (baclofen, OXT) and CSC (baclofen) mice, whereas intracerebroventricular OXT (0.5 ?g/2 ?l) was ineffective in both groups. Taken together, these results suggest that (i) chronic psychosocial stress enhances EtOH consumption, and (ii) baclofen and OXT differentially affect EtOH intake in mice.
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Time matters: pathological effects of repeated psychosocial stress during the active, but not inactive, phase of male mice.
J. Endocrinol.
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Recent findings in rats indicated that the physiological consequences of repeated restraint stress are dependent on the time of day of stressor exposure. To investigate whether this is also true for clinically more relevant psychosocial stressors and whether repeated stressor exposure during the light phase or dark phase is more detrimental for an organism, we exposed male C57BL/6 mice to social defeat (SD) across 19 days either in the light phase between Zeitgeber time (ZT)1 and ZT3 (SDL mice) or in the dark phase between ZT13 and ZT15 (SDD mice). While SDL mice showed a prolonged increase in adrenal weight and an attenuated adrenal responsiveness to ACTH in vitro after stressor termination, SDD mice showed reduced dark phase home-cage activity on observation days 7, 14, and 20, flattening of the diurnal corticosterone rhythm, lack of social preference, and higher in vitro IFN? secretion from mesenteric lymph node cells on day 20/21. Furthermore, the colitis-aggravating effect of SD was more pronounced in SDD than SDL mice following dextran sulfate sodium treatment. In conclusion, the present findings demonstrate that repeated SD effects on behavior, physiology, and immunology strongly depend on the time of day of stressor exposure. Whereas physiological parameters were more affected by SD during the light/inactive phase of mice, behavioral and immunological parameters were more affected by SD during the dark phase. Our results imply that repeated daily SD exposure has a more negative outcome when applied during the dark/active phase. By contrast, the minor physiological changes seen in SDL mice might represent beneficial adaptations preventing the formation of those maladaptive consequences.
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High and abnormal forms of aggression in rats with extremes in trait anxiety--involvement of the dopamine system in the nucleus accumbens.
Psychoneuroendocrinology
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A better neurobiological understanding of high and abnormal aggression based on adequate animal models is essential for novel therapy and prevention. Selective breeding of rats for extremes in anxiety-related behavior resulted in two behavioral phenotypes with high and abnormal forms of aggression. Rats bred for low anxiety-related behavior (LAB) consistently show highest levels of aggression and little social investigation in the resident-intruder (RI) test, compared with non-selected low-aggressive (NAB) rats. High anxiety-related (HAB) rats also show higher levels of aggression than NAB rats, but to a lesser extent than LAB rats. Accordingly, extremes in inborn anxiety in both directions are linked to an increased aggression level. Further, both LAB and HAB, but not NAB males, display abnormal aggression (attacks towards vulnerable body parts, females or narcotized males), which is particularly prominent in LABs. Also, only in LAB rats, the nucleus accumbens (NAc) was found to be strongly activated in response to the RI test as reflected by increased c-fos and zif268 mRNA expression, and higher local dopamine release compared with NAB males, without differences in local dopamine receptor binding. Consequently, local pharmacological manipulation by infusion of an anesthetic (lidocaine, 20 ?g/?l) or a dopamine D2 (haloperidol, 10 ng/?l), but not D1 (SCH-23390 10 ng/?l), receptor antagonist significantly reduced high aggression in LAB rats. Thus, LAB rats are an adequate model to study high and abnormal aggression. In LAB males, this is likely to be linked to hyper-activation of the reward system, as found in psychopathic patients. Specifically, activation of the accumbal dopamine system is likely to underlie the high aggression observed in LAB rats.
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Chronic psychosocial stress results in sensitization of the HPA axis to acute heterotypic stressors despite a reduction of adrenal in vitro ACTH responsiveness.
Psychoneuroendocrinology
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Although chronic psychosocial stress is often accompanied by changes in basal hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, it is vital for a chronically-stressed organism to mount adequate glucocorticoid (GC) responses when exposed to acute challenges. The main aim of the present study was to test whether this is true or not for the chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC, 19 days) paradigm, an established and clinically relevant mouse model of chronic psychosocial stress. As shown previously, CSC mice are characterized by unaffected morning and decreased evening plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels despite enlarged adrenals, suggesting a maladaptive breakdown of adrenal functioning. Plasma CORT levels, determined by repeated blood sampling via jugular vein catheters, as well as relative right adrenal CORT content were increased in CSC compared with single-housed control (SHC) mice in response to acute elevated platform (EPF, 5min) exposure. However, in vitro stimulation of adrenal explants with physiological and pharmacological doses of ACTH revealed an attenuated responsiveness of both the left and right adrenal glands following CSC, despite mRNA and/or protein expression of melanocortin 2 receptor (Mc2r), Mc2r accessory protein (MRAP), and key enzymes of steroidogenesis were not down-regulated. Taken together, we show that chronic psychosocial stressor exposure impairs in vitro ACTH responsiveness of both the left and right adrenal glands, whereas it increases adrenal responsiveness to an acute heterotypic stressor in vivo. This suggests that an additional factor present during acute stressor exposure in vivo rescues left and right adrenal ACTH sensitivity, or itself acts as CORT secretagogue in chronically stressed CSC mice.
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Comparison of corticosterone responses to acute stressors: chronic jugular vein versus trunk blood samples in mice.
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A commonly used method for obtaining blood samples from mice is decapitation. However, there is an obvious need for repeated blood sampling in mice under stress-free conditions. Here, we describe a simple technique to repeatedly collect blood samples from conscious, freely moving mice through a chronically implanted jugular vein catheter. Furthermore, we compare plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentrations in samples obtained through the catheter 1 day after surgery with samples taken from trunk blood obtained under basal or acute stress conditions. CORT concentrations in repeated 100-?l venous blood samples were found to be similar to trunk blood samples both under basal conditions and after stressor exposure collected at identical time points (at 5, 15, and 60 min). Using both techniques, we demonstrate a progressive increase in CORT levels until 15 min after termination of stressor exposure and a decrease towards baseline values 60 min later. Anxiety-related behavior, as assessed on the elevated plus maze 3-4 days after surgery, did not differ between catheterized and non-catheterized mice. Our results provide evidence for application of jugular vein catheterization as a technique for repeated blood sampling in conscious laboratory mice. Use of this technique will greatly reduce the number of animals required for experiments involving endocrine endpoints.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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