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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Could FaRP-Like Peptides Participate in Regulation of Hyperosmotic Stress Responses in Plants?
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne)
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2014
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The ability to respond to hyperosmotic stress is one of the numerous conserved cellular processes that most of the organisms have to face during their life. In metazoans, some peptides belonging to the FMRFamide-like peptide (FLP) family were shown to participate in osmoregulation via regulation of ion channels; this is, a well-known response to hyperosmotic stress in plants. Thus, we explored whether FLPs exist and regulate osmotic stress in plants. First, we demonstrated the response of Arabidopsis thaliana cultured cells to a metazoan FLP (FLRF). We found that A. thaliana express genes that display typical FLP repeated sequences, which end in RF and are surrounded by K or R, which is typical of cleavage sites and suggests bioactivity; however, the terminal G, allowing an amidation process in metazoan, seems to be replaced by W. Using synthetic peptides, we showed that amidation appears unnecessary to bioactivity in A. thaliana, and we provide evidence that these putative FLPs could be involved in physiological processes related to hyperosmotic stress responses in plants, urging further studies on this topic.
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Gravity affects the closure of the traps in Dionaea muscipula.
Biomed Res Int
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2014
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Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Ellis) is a carnivorous plant known for its ability to capture insects thanks to the fast snapping of its traps. This fast movement has been long studied and it is triggered by the mechanical stimulation of hairs, located in the middle of the leaves. Here we present detailed experiments on the effect of microgravity on trap closure recorded for the first time during a parabolic flight campaign. Our results suggest that gravity has an impact on trap responsiveness and on the kinetics of trap closure. The possible role of the alterations of membrane permeability induced by microgravity on trap movement is discussed. Finally we show how the Venus flytrap could be an easy and effective model plant to perform studies on ion channels and aquaporin activities, as well as on electrical activity in vivo on board of parabolic flights and large diameter centrifuges.
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New insights into the metabolic and molecular mechanism of plant response to anaerobiosis.
Int Rev Cell Mol Biol
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2014
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Under anaerobic conditions, plants apply a wide spectrum of precise adaptive strategies responding to several critical challenges. The ability of efficiently sensing the oxygen presence demonstrates the existence of both direct and indirect ways of perception. The subsequent coordinate metabolic reassessment is currently under study. The complex molecular response implicates not only transcriptional and translational regulation of specific genes but also posttranscriptional and posttranslational regulatory mechanisms, each and all integrating the metabolic settings. Furthermore, the accumulation of typical metabolites during low oxygen stress condition is a key factor that suggests some critical topics in the regulation of metabolic pathways. Here, we summarize the main routes for adaptive behavior during oxygen depletion, from oxygen availability perception to recently discovered molecular mechanisms and metabolic adaptations.
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Zn2+ -induced changes at the root level account for the increased tolerance of acclimated tobacco plants.
J. Exp. Bot.
PUBLISHED: 06-13-2014
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Evidence suggests that heavy-metal tolerance can be induced in plants following pre-treatment with non-toxic metal concentrations, but the results are still controversial. In the present study, tobacco plants were exposed to increasing Zn2+ concentrations (up to 250 and/or 500 ?M ZnSO4) with or without a 1-week acclimation period with 30 ?M ZnSO4. Elevated Zn2+ was highly toxic for plants, and after 3 weeks of treatments there was a marked (?50%) decline in plant growth in non-acclimated plants. Plant acclimation, on the other hand, increased plant dry mass and leaf area up to 1.6-fold compared with non-acclimated ones. In non-acclimated plants, the addition of 250 ?M ZnSO4 led to transient membrane depolarization and stomatal closure within 24h from the addition of the stress; by contrast, the acclimation process was associated with an improved stomatal regulation and a superior ability to maintain a negative root membrane potential, with values on average 37% more negative compared with non-acclimated plants. The different response at the plasma-membrane level between acclimated and non-acclimated plants was associated with an enhanced vacuolar Zn2+ sequestration and up to 2-fold higher expression of the tobacco orthologue of the Arabidopsis thaliana MTP1 gene. Thus, the acclimation process elicited specific detoxification mechanisms in roots that enhanced Zn2+ compartmentalization in vacuoles, thereby improving root membrane functionality and stomatal regulation in leaves following elevated Zn2+ stress.
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PTR-TOF-MS analysis of volatile compounds in olive fruits.
J. Sci. Food Agric.
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2014
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Volatile compounds of Cellina di Nardò and Ogliarola Barese, two typical Italian olive varieties, have been characterised at different ripening stages. Proton transfer reaction-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) was used for the first time on these fruits with the aim of characterising the volatile profile and, in the case of Ogliarola, the changes which may occur during the maturation process.
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Oxidative stress and NO signalling in the root apex as an early response to changes in gravity conditions.
Biomed Res Int
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2014
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Oxygen influx showed an asymmetry in the transition zone of the root apex when roots were placed horizontally on ground. The influx increased only in the upper side, while no changes were detected in the division and in the elongation zone. Nitric oxide (NO) was also monitored after gravistimulation, revealing a sudden burst only in the transition zone. In order to confirm these results in real microgravity conditions, experiments have been set up by using parabolic flights and drop tower. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was also monitored. Oxygen, NO, and ROS were continuously monitored during normal and hyper- and microgravity conditions in roots of maize seedlings. A distinct signal in oxygen and NO fluxes was clearly detected only in the apex zone during microgravity, with no significant changes in normal and in hypergravity conditions. The same results were obtained by ROS measurement. The detrimental effect of D'orenone, disrupting the polarised auxin transport, on the onset of the oxygen peaks during the microgravity period was also evaluated. Results indicates an active role of NO and ROS as messengers during the gravitropic response, with probable implications in the auxin redistribution.
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Protection of tobacco cells from oxidative copper toxicity by catalytically active metal-binding DNA oligomers.
J. Exp. Bot.
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2014
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The impact of copper ions on the oxidative and calcium signal transductions, leading to cell death in plant cells, have been documented. Copper induces a series of biological and chemical reactions in plant cells including the oxidative burst reflecting the production of reactive oxygen species and the stimulation of calcium channel opening allowing a transient increase in cytosolic calcium concentrations. These early events, completed within a few minutes after the contact with copper, are known to trigger the development of cell death. The effects of DNA fragments with copper-binding motifs as novel plant cell-protecting agents were assessed using cell suspension cultures of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L., cell line BY-2) expressing the aequorin gene. The addition of GC-rich double-stranded DNA fragments, prior to the addition of copper ions, effectively blocked both the copper-induced calcium influx and cell death. In addition, the DNA-Cu complex examined was shown to possess superoxide-scavenging catalytic activity, suggesting that DNA-mediated protection of the cells from copper toxicity is due to the removal of superoxide. Lastly, a possible mechanism of DNA-Cu interaction and future applications of these DNA fragments in the protection of plant roots from metal toxicity or in aid of phyto-remediation processes are discussed.
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Class-modeling approach to PTR-TOFMS data: a peppers case study.
J. Sci. Food Agric.
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2014
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Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), in its recently developed implementation based on time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOFMS), was used to rapidly determine the volatile compounds present in fruits of Capsicum spp.
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Plant anesthesia supports similarities between animals and plants: Claude Bernard's forgotten studies.
Plant Signal Behav
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2014
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The French scientist Claude Bernard (1813-1878) is famous for his discoveries in physiology and for introducing rigorous experimental methods to medicine and biology. One of his major technical innovations was the use of chemicals in order to disrupt normal physiological function to test hypotheses. But less known is his conviction that the physiological functions of all living organisms rely on the same underlying principles. He hypothesized that similarly to animals, plants are also able to sense changes in their environment. He called this ability "sensitivity." In order to test his ideas, he performed anesthesia on plants and the results of these experiments were presented in 1878 in "Leçonssur les phénomènes de la vie communs aux animaux et aux végétaux." The phenomena described by Claude Bernard more than a century ago are not fully understood yet. Here, we present a short overview of anesthetic effects in animals and we discuss how anesthesia affects plant movements, seed germination, and photosynthesis. Surprisingly, these phenomena may have ecological relevance, since stressed plants generate anesthetics such as ethylene and ether. Finally, we discuss Claude Bernard's interpretations and conclusions in the perspective of modern plant sciences.
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Deciphering early events involved in hyperosmotic stress-induced programmed cell death in tobacco BY-2 cells.
J. Exp. Bot.
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2014
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Hyperosmotic stresses represent one of the major constraints that adversely affect plants growth, development, and productivity. In this study, the focus was on early responses to hyperosmotic stress- (NaCl and sorbitol) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) increase, ion fluxes, and mitochondrial potential variations, and on their links in pathways leading to programmed cell death (PCD). By using BY-2 tobacco cells, it was shown that both NaCl- and sorbitol-induced PCD seemed to be dependent on superoxide anion (O2·(-)) generation by NADPH-oxidase. In the case of NaCl, an early influx of sodium through non-selective cation channels participates in the development of PCD through mitochondrial dysfunction and NADPH-oxidase-dependent O2·(-) generation. This supports the hypothesis of different pathways in NaCl- and sorbitol-induced cell death. Surprisingly, other shared early responses, such as [Ca(2+)]cyt increase and singlet oxygen production, do not seem to be involved in PCD.
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Experience teaches plants to learn faster and forget slower in environments where it matters.
Oecologia
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2014
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The nervous system of animals serves the acquisition, memorization and recollection of information. Like animals, plants also acquire a huge amount of information from their environment, yet their capacity to memorize and organize learned behavioral responses has not been demonstrated. In Mimosa pudica-the sensitive plant-the defensive leaf-folding behaviour in response to repeated physical disturbance exhibits clear habituation, suggesting some elementary form of learning. Applying the theory and the analytical methods usually employed in animal learning research, we show that leaf-folding habituation is more pronounced and persistent for plants growing in energetically costly environments. Astonishingly, Mimosa can display the learned response even when left undisturbed in a more favourable environment for a month. This relatively long-lasting learned behavioural change as a result of previous experience matches the persistence of habituation effects observed in many animals.
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Ozone-induced caspase-like activities are dependent on early ion channel regulations and ROS generation in Arabidopsis thaliana cells.
Plant Signal Behav
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2013
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Using A. thaliana cultured cells; we recently reported new insights regarding the effect of acute O? exposure. This consist in an oxidative dependent controlled cell death process involving cell shrinkage due to an early activation of anion channel (1) and a delayed activation of K(+) outward currents, but also to early events like Ca (2+) influx or singlet oxygen production possibly linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. Here we provide evidence that most of these early events act downstream of caspase-like activities as recently demonstrated for K(+) channel activation.
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Post-transcriptional regulation of GORK channels by superoxide anion contributes to increases in outward-rectifying K? currents.
New Phytol.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2013
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· Ion fluxes are ubiquitous processes in the plant and animal kingdoms, controlled by fine-tuned regulations of ion channel activity. Yet the mechanism that cells employ to achieve the modification of ion homeostasis at the molecular level still remains unclear. This is especially true when it comes to the mechanisms that lead to cell death. · In this study, Arabidopsis thaliana cells were exposed to ozone (O?). Ion flux variations were analyzed by electrophysiological measurements and their transcriptional regulation by RT-PCR. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was quantified by luminescence techniques and caspase-like activities were investigated by laser confocal microscopy. · We highlighted the delayed activation of K(+) outward-rectifying currents after an O? -induced oxidative stress leading to programmed cell death (PCD). Caspase-like activities are detected under O? exposure and could be decreased by K(+) channel blocker. Molecular experiments revealed that the sustained activation of K(+) outward current could be the result of an unexpected O? ·? post-transcriptional regulation of the guard cell outward-rectifying K(+) (GORK) channels. · This consists of a likely new mode of regulating the processing of the GORK mRNA, in a ROS-dependent manner, to allow sustained K(+) effluxes during PCD. These data provide new mechanistic insights into K(+) channel regulation during an oxidative stress response.
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Arabidopsis TWISTED DWARF1 functionally interacts with auxin exporter ABCB1 on the root plasma membrane.
Plant Cell
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2013
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Plant architecture is influenced by the polar, cell-to-cell transport of auxin that is primarily provided and regulated by plasma membrane efflux catalysts of the PIN-FORMED and B family of ABC transporter (ABCB) classes. The latter were shown to require the functionality of the FK506 binding protein42 TWISTED DWARF1 (TWD1), although underlying mechanisms are unclear. By genetic manipulation of TWD1 expression, we show here that TWD1 affects shootward root auxin reflux and, thus, downstream developmental traits, such as epidermal twisting and gravitropism of the root. Using immunological assays, we demonstrate a predominant lateral, mainly outward-facing, plasma membrane location for TWD1 in the root epidermis characterized by the lateral marker ABC transporter G36/PLEIOTROPIC DRUG-RESISTANCE8/PENETRATION3. At these epidermal plasma membrane domains, TWD1 colocalizes with nonpolar ABCB1. In planta bioluminescence resonance energy transfer analysis was used to verify specific ABC transporter B1 (ABCB1)-TWD1 interaction. Our data support a model in which TWD1 promotes lateral ABCB-mediated auxin efflux via protein-protein interaction at the plasma membrane, minimizing reflux from the root apoplast into the cytoplasm.
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Root apex transition zone as oscillatory zone.
Front Plant Sci
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Root apex of higher plants shows very high sensitivity to environmental stimuli. The root cap acts as the most prominent plant sensory organ; sensing diverse physical parameters such as gravity, light, humidity, oxygen, and critical inorganic nutrients. However, the motoric responses to these stimuli are accomplished in the elongation region. This spatial discrepancy was solved when we have discovered and characterized the transition zone which is interpolated between the apical meristem and the subapical elongation zone. Cells of this zone are very active in the cytoskeletal rearrangements, endocytosis and endocytic vesicle recycling, as well as in electric activities. Here we discuss the oscillatory nature of the transition zone which, together with several other features of this zone, suggest that it acts as some kind of command center. In accordance with the early proposal of Charles and Francis Darwin, cells of this root zone receive sensory information from the root cap and instruct the motoric responses of cells in the elongation zone.
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Microorganism and filamentous fungi drive evolution of plant synapses.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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In the course of plant evolution, there is an obvious trend toward an increased complexity of plant bodies, as well as an increased sophistication of plant behavior and communication. Phenotypic plasticity of plants is based on the polar auxin transport machinery that is directly linked with plant sensory systems impinging on plant behavior and adaptive responses. Similar to the emergence and evolution of eukaryotic cells, evolution of land plants was also shaped and driven by infective and symbiotic microorganisms. These microorganisms are the driving force behind the evolution of plant synapses and other neuronal aspects of higher plants; this is especially pronounced in the root apices. Plant synapses allow synaptic cell-cell communication and coordination in plants, as well as sensory-motor integration in root apices searching for water and mineral nutrition. These neuronal aspects of higher plants are closely linked with their unique ability to adapt to environmental changes.
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Illumination of Arabidopsis roots induces immediate burst of ROS production.
Plant Signal Behav
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2011
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Arabidopsis roots are routinely exposed to light both during their cultivation within transparent Petri dishes and during their confocal microscopy analysis. Here we report that illumination of roots which naturally grow in darkness, even for a few seconds, induces an immediate and strong burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Plant scientists studying roots should pay great attention to the environment of living roots, and keep them in darkness as long as possible. Results obtained using illuminated roots during in vivo microscopic analysis should also be interpreted with great caution.
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Electrical signaling and photosynthesis: can they co-exist together?
Plant Signal Behav
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2011
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Mechanical irritation of trigger hairs and subsequent generation of action potentials have significant impact on photosynthesis and respiration in carnivorous Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula). Action potential-mediated inhibition of photosynthesis and stimulation of respiration is confined only to the trap and was not recorded in adjacent photosynthetic lamina. We showed that the main primary target of electrical signals on assimilation is in the dark enzymatic reaction of photosynthesis. Without doubt, the electrical signaling is costly, and the possible co-existence of such type of signals and photosynthesis in plant cell is discussed.
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Effect of hypoxic acclimation on anoxia tolerance in Vitis roots: response of metabolic activity and K+ fluxes.
Plant Cell Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2011
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The effect of a hypoxic pre-treatment (HPT) on improving tolerance to prolonged anoxia conditions in two contrasting Vitis species (V. riparia, anoxia tolerant; V. rupestris, anoxia sensitive) was evaluated. The energy economy of root cells was studied by measuring heat production, the activity of pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and alcohol dehdrogenase (ADH), ethanol and ATP production, and K(+) fluxes. The results showed that HPT is an effective tool in order to maintain a sustainable metabolic performance in both the species under anoxia conditions, especially in sensitive species such as V. rupestris. Our results showed that the improved tolerance was mainly driven by: (i) an enhanced activity of key enzymes in alcohol fermentation (ADC and PDC); (ii) the capability to maintain a higher level of respiration, evidenced by a lesser decrease in heat development and ATP production; and (iii) the maintenance of a better ion homeostasis (highlighted by measurement of K(+) fluxes) and K(+) channel functionality.
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Assessing the role of root plasma membrane and tonoplast Na+/H+ exchangers in salinity tolerance in wheat: in planta quantification methods.
Plant Cell Environ.
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2011
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This work investigates the role of cytosolic Na+ exclusion in roots as a means of salinity tolerance in wheat, and offers in planta methods for the functional assessment of major transporters contributing to this trait. An electrophysiological protocol was developed to quantify the activity of plasma membrane Na+ efflux systems in roots, using the microelectrode ion flux estimation (MIFE) technique. We show that active efflux of Na+ from wheat root epidermal cells is mediated by a SOS1-like homolog, energized by the plasma membrane H+-ATPase. SOS1-like efflux activity was highest in Kharchia 65, a salt-tolerant bread wheat cultivar. Kharchia 65 also had an enhanced ability to sequester large quantities of Na+ into the vacuoles of root cells, as revealed by confocal microscopy using Sodium Green. These findings were consistent with the highest level of expression of both SOS1 and NHX1 transcripts in plant roots in this variety. In the sensitive wheat varieties, a greater proportion of Na+ was located in the root cell cytosol. Overall, our findings suggest a critical role of cytosolic Na+ exclusion for salinity tolerance in wheat and offer convenient protocols to quantify the contribution of the major transporters conferring this trait, to screen plants for salinity tolerance.
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Sequential depolarization of root cortical and stelar cells induced by an acute salt shock - implications for Na(+) and K(+) transport into xylem vessels.
Plant Cell Environ.
PUBLISHED: 02-22-2011
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Early events in NaCl-induced root ion and water transport were investigated in maize (Zea mays L) roots using a range of microelectrode and imaging techniques. Addition of 100 mm NaCl to the bath resulted in an exponential drop in root xylem pressure, rapid depolarization of trans-root potential and a transient drop in xylem K(+) activity (A(K+) ) within ?1 min after stress onset. At this time, no detectable amounts of Na(+) were released into the xylem vessels. The observed drop in A(K+) was unexpected, given the fact that application of the physiologically relevant concentrations of Na(+) to isolated stele has caused rapid plasma membrane depolarization and a subsequent K(+) efflux from the stelar tissues. This controversy was explained by the difference in kinetics of NaCl-induced depolarization between cortical and stelar cells. As root cortical cells are first to be depolarized and lose K(+) to the environment, this is associated with some K(+) shift from the stelar symplast to the cortex, resulting in K(+) being transiently removed from the xylem. Once Na(+) is loaded into the xylem (between 1 and 5 min of root exposure to NaCl), stelar cells become more depolarized, and a gradual recovery in A(K+) occurs.
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On the mechanism underlying photosynthetic limitation upon trigger hair irritation in the carnivorous plant Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Ellis).
J. Exp. Bot.
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2011
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Mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs on the adaxial surface of the trap of Dionaea muscipula leads to the generation of action potentials and to rapid leaf movement. After rapid closure secures the prey, the struggle against the trigger hairs results in generation of further action potentials which inhibit photosynthesis. A detailed analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence kinetics and gas exchange measurements in response to generation of action potentials in irritated D. muscipula traps was used to determine the site effect of the electrical signal-induced inhibition of photosynthesis. Irritation of trigger hairs and subsequent generation of action potentials resulted in a decrease in the effective photochemical quantum yield of photosystem II (?(PSII)) and the rate of net photosynthesis (A(N)). During the first seconds of irritation, increased excitation pressure in photosystem II (PSII) was the major contributor to the decreased ?(PSII). Within ?1?min, non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) released the excitation pressure at PSII. Measurements of the fast chlorophyll a fluorescence transient (O-J-I-P) revealed a direct impact of action potentials on the charge separation-recombination reactions in PSII, although the effect seems to be small rather than substantial. All the data presented here indicate that the main primary target of the electrical signal-induced inhibition of photosynthesis is the dark reaction, whereas the inhibition of electron transport is only a consequence of reduced carboxylation efficiency. In addition, the study also provides valuable data confirming the hypothesis that chlorophyll a fluorescence is under electrochemical control.
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AGD5 is a GTPase-activating protein at the trans-Golgi network.
Plant J.
PUBLISHED: 11-04-2010
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ARF-GTPases are important proteins that control membrane trafficking events. Their activity is largely influenced by the interplay between guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), which facilitate the activation or inactivation of ARF-GTPases, respectively. There are 15 predicted proteins that contain an ARF-GAP domain within the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, and these are classified as ARF-GAP domain (AGD) proteins. The function and subcellular distribution of AGDs, including the ability to activate ARF-GTPases in vivo, that remain largely uncharacterized to date. Here we show that AGD5 is localised to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), where it co-localises with ARF1, a crucial GTPase that is involved in membrane trafficking and which was previously shown to be distributed on Golgi and post-Golgi structures of unknown nature. Taking advantage of the in vivo AGD5-ARF1 interaction at the TGN, we show that mutation of an arginine residue that is critical for ARF-GAP activity of AGD5 leads to longer residence of ARF1 on the membranes, as expected if GTP hydrolysis on ARF1 was impaired due to a defective GAP. Our results establish the nature of the post-Golgi compartments in which ARF1 localises, as well as identifying the role of AGD5 in?vivo as a TGN-localised GAP. Furthermore, in vitro experiments established the promiscuous interaction between AGD5 and the plasma membrane-localised ADP ribosylation factor B (ARFB), confirming that ARF-GAP specificity for ARF-GTPases within the cell environment may be spatially regulated.
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Federico Delpino and the foundation of plant biology.
Plant Signal Behav
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2010
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In 1867, Federico Delpino, with his seminal work "Pensieri sulla biologia vegetale" (Thoughts on plant biology) established plant biology by defining it not in the broad general sense, namely as the science of living beings, but as a branch of natural science dedicated to the study of plant life in relation to the environment. Today, the figure and achievements of this outstanding plant scientist it is almost unknown. In the following pages, I will concisely describe the main realizations of Federico Delpino and outline the significance of his work for modern plant science.
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Identification of an ABCB/P-glycoprotein-specific inhibitor of auxin transport by chemical genomics.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2010
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Plant development and physiology are widely determined by the polar transport of the signaling molecule auxin. This process is controlled on the cellular efflux level catalyzed by members of the PIN (pin-formed) and ABCB (ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily B)/P-glycoprotein family that can function independently and coordinately. In this study, we have identified by means of chemical genomics a novel auxin transport inhibitor (ATI), BUM (2-[4-(diethylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoyl]benzoic acid), that efficiently blocks auxin-regulated plant physiology and development. In many respects, BUM resembles the functionality of the diagnostic ATI, 1-N-naphtylphtalamic acid (NPA), but it has an IC(50) value that is roughly a factor 30 lower. Physiological analysis and binding assays identified ABCBs, primarily ABCB1, as key targets of BUM and NPA, whereas PIN proteins are apparently not directly affected. BUM is complementary to NPA by having distinct ABCB target spectra and impacts on basipetal polar auxin transport in the shoot and root. In comparison with the recently identified ATI, gravacin, it lacks interference with ABCB membrane trafficking. Individual modes or targets of action compared with NPA are reflected by apically shifted root influx maxima that might be the result of altered BUM binding preferences or affinities to the ABCB nucleotide binding folds. This qualifies BUM as a valuable tool for auxin research, allowing differentiation between ABCB- and PIN-mediated efflux systems. Besides its obvious application as a powerful weed herbicide, BUM is a bona fide human ABCB inhibitor with the potential to restrict multidrug resistance during chemotherapy.
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Root apex transition zone: a signalling-response nexus in the root.
Trends Plant Sci.
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2010
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Longitudinal zonation, as well as a simple and regular anatomy, are hallmarks of the root apex. Here we focus on one particular root-apex zone, the transition zone, which is located between the apical meristem and basal elongation region. This zone has a unique role as the determiner of cell fate and root growth; this is accomplished by means of the complex system of a polar auxin transport circuit. The transition zone also integrates diverse inputs from endogenous (hormonal) and exogenous (sensorial) stimuli and translates them into signalling and motoric outputs as adaptive differential growth responses. These underlie the root-apex tropisms and other aspects of adaptive root behaviour.
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Accumulation of xylem transported protein at pit membranes and associated reductions in hydraulic conductance.
J. Exp. Bot.
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2010
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Proteins and traces of polysaccharide are the only polymeric colloids consistently transported in the xylem sap of plants. The hypothesis that such proteins could have physical inhibitory effects on xylem water transport was investigated. Ovalbumin, with a molecular weight of 45 kDa and a molecular diameter of 5.4 nm, is an inert, water-soluble protein that is midway along the size range of endogenous xylem sap proteins. Solutions of ovalbumin conjugated to a fluorescent marker and supplied to transpiring shoot explants of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) and olive (Olea europaea L.) were shown by confocal laser scanning microscopy to accumulate specifically at wall-based pit membranes that connect neighbouring xylem conduits. In addition, pressure-induced perfusion of micro-filtered ovalbumin solutions, at concentrations similar to those of endogenous xylem sap proteins, through the xylem of tobacco stem or olive twig segments resulted in the retention of c. 40% of the ovalbumin and reductions in the axial hydraulic conductance of the xylem. Smaller molecules such as Texas Red 3000 (MW 3 kDa) and Alexafluor 488-cadaverin conjugates (MW 0.64 kDa) did not show similar characteristics. The partial reduction in xylem hydraulic conductance appeared to be related to the accumulation of ovalbumin at xylem pit membranes and the consequent fouling of trans-membrane water-conducting pores with smaller diameters than those of the ovalbumin molecules. Potential implications of these novel findings for whole-plant water relations are considered.
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Specificity of polyamine effects on NaCl-induced ion flux kinetics and salt stress amelioration in plants.
Plant Cell Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2010
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Polyamine (PA) levels in plants increase considerably under saline conditions. Because such an increase is believed to be beneficial for stress resistance, exogenous application of PAs has often been advocated as a means of ameliorating the detrimental effects of salinity. Results, however, are rather controversial, ranging from a significant amelioration to being ineffective or even toxic. The reasons for this controversy remain elusive. The ability of a root to retain K(+) in the presence of NaCl was used as a physiological indicator to evaluate the ameliorative effects of PA. Pre-treatment with 1 mM Spm(4+) (spermine), Spd(3+) (spermidine) or Put(2+) (putrescine) prevented salt-induced K(+) leak only in the mature root zone of hydroponically grown maize and Arabidopsis. In contrast, in the distal elongation root zone, PA pre-treatment resulted in an even larger NaCl-induced K(+) efflux, with the effect ranging from Spm(4+) >Spd(3+ )= Put(2+). A similar sequence has been also reported for H(+) pump inhibition, measured for both root zones. It appears that PAs affect cell membrane transporters in a highly specific way, with a relatively narrow window in which amelioration is observed. We suggest that the ameliorative affect of PAs is the result of a complex combination of factors which might potentially include PA transport and accumulation in the cell cytosol, their metabolization and the functional expression of the specific target proteins or signaling elements.
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The root-brain hypothesis of Charles and Francis Darwin: Revival after more than 125 years.
Plant Signal Behav
PUBLISHED: 11-09-2009
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This year celebrates the 200(th) aniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin, best known for his theory of evolution summarized in On the Origin of Species. Less well known is that, in the second half of his life, Darwins major scientific focus turned towards plants. He wrote several books on plants, the next-to-last of which, The Power of Movement of Plants, published together with his son Francis, opened plants to a new view. Here we amplify the final sentence of this book in which the Darwins proposed that: "It is hardly an exaggeration to say that the tip of the radicle thus endowed [with sensitivity] and having the power of directing the movements of the adjoining parts, acts like the brain of one of the lower animals; the brain being seated within the anterior end of the body, receiving impressions from the sense-organs, and directing the several movements." This sentence conveys two important messages: first, that the root apex may be considered to be a brain-like organ endowed with a sensitivity which controls its navigation through soil; second, that the root apex represents the anterior end of the plant body. In this article, we discuss both these statements.
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Deep evolutionary origins of neurobiology: Turning the essence of neural upside-down.
Commun Integr Biol
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2009
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It is generally assumed, both in common-sense argumentations and scientific concepts, that brains and neurons represent late evolutionary achievements which are present only in more advanced animals. Here we overview recently published data clearly revealing that our understanding of bacteria, unicellular eukaryotic organisms, plants, brains and neurons, rooted in the Aristotelian philosophy is flawed. Neural aspects of biological systems are obvious already in bacteria and unicellular biological units such as sexual gametes and diverse unicellular eukaryotic organisms. Altogether, processes and activities thought to represent evolutionary recent specializations of the nervous system emerge rather to represent ancient and fundamental cell survival processes.
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Plant neurobiology: from sensory biology, via plant communication, to social plant behavior.
Cogn Process
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2009
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In plants, numerous parameters of both biotic and abiotic environments are continuously monitored. Specialized cells are evolutionary-optimized for effective translation of sensory input into developmental and motoric output. Importantly, diverse physical forces, influences, and insults induce immediate electric responses in plants. Recent advances in plant cell biology, molecular biology, and sensory ecology will be discussed in the framework of recently initiated new discipline of plant sciences, namely plant neurobiology.
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Finding and defining the natural automata acting in living plants: Toward the synthetic biology for robotics and informatics in vivo.
Commun Integr Biol
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The automata theory is the mathematical study of abstract machines commonly studied in the theoretical computer science and highly interdisciplinary fields that combine the natural sciences and the theoretical computer science. In the present review article, as the chemical and biological basis for natural computing or informatics, some plants, plant cells or plant-derived molecules involved in signaling are listed and classified as natural sequential machines (namely, the Mealy machines or Moore machines) or finite state automata. By defining the actions (states and transition functions) of these natural automata, the similarity between the computational data processing and plant decision-making processes became obvious. Finally, their putative roles as the parts for plant-based computing or robotic systems are discussed.
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Ion channels in plants: From bioelectricity, via signaling, to behavioral actions.
Plant Signal Behav
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In his recent opus magnum review paper published in the October issue of Physiology Reviews, Rainer Hedrich summarized the field of plant ion channels. ( 1) He started from the earliest electric recordings initiated by Charles Darwin of carnivorous Dionaea muscipula, ( 1,2) known as Venus flytrap, and covered the topic extensively up to the most recent discoveries on Shaker-type potassium channels, anion channels of SLAC/SLAH families, and ligand-activated channels of glutamate receptor-like type (GLR) and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGC). ( 1).
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Acoustic and magnetic communication in plants: Is it possible?
Plant Signal Behav
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Over the last two decades, important insights into our understanding of plant ecology and the communicative nature of plants have not only confirmed the existence of a wide range of communication means used by plants, but most excitingly have indicated that more modalities remain to be discovered. In fact, we have recently found that seeds and seedlings of the chili plant, Capsicum annuum, are able to sense neighbors and identify relatives using alternative mechanisms beyond previously studied channels of plant communication. In this addendum, we offer a hypothetical mechanistic explanation as to how plants may do this by quantum-assisted magnetic and/or acoustic sensing and signaling. If proven correct, this hypothesis prompts for a re-interpretation of our current understanding of plasticity in germination and growth of plants and more generally, calls for developing a new perspective of these biological phenomena.
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Origin of polar order in dense suspensions of phototactic micro-swimmers.
PLoS ONE
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A main question for the study of collective motion in living organisms is the origin of orientational polar order, i.e., how organisms align and what are the benefits of such collective behaviour. In the case of micro-organisms swimming at a low Reynolds number, steric repulsion and long-range hydrodynamic interactions are not sufficient to explain a homogeneous polar order state in which the direction of motion is aligned. An external symmetry-breaking guiding field such as a mechanism of taxis appears necessary to understand this phonemonon. We have investigated the onset of polar order in the velocity field induced by phototaxis in a suspension of a motile micro-organism, the algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, for density values above the limit provided by the hydrodynamic approximation of a force dipole model. We show that polar order originates from a combination of both the external guiding field intensity and the population density. In particular, we show evidence for a linear dependence of a phototactic guiding field on cell density to determine the polar order for dense suspensions and demonstrate the existence of a density threshold for the origin of polar order. This threshold represents the density value below which cells undergoing phototaxis are not able to maintain a homogeneous polar order state and marks the transition to ordered collective motion. Such a transition is driven by a noise dominated phototactic reorientation where the noise is modelled as a normal distribution with a variance that is inversely proportional to the guiding field strength. Finally, we discuss the role of density in dense suspensions of phototactic micro-swimmers.
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Out of sight but not out of mind: alternative means of communication in plants.
PLoS ONE
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Current knowledge suggests that the mechanisms by which plants communicate information take numerous forms. Previous studies have focussed their attention on communication via chemicals, contact and light; other methods of interaction between plants have remained speculative. In this study we tested the ability of young chilli plants to sense their neighbours and identify their relatives using alternative mechanism(s) to recognised plant communication pathways. We found that the presence of a neighbouring plant had a significant influence on seed germination even when all known sources of communication signals were blocked. Furthermore, despite the signalling restriction, seedlings allocated energy to their stem and root systems differently depending on the identity of the neighbour. These results provide clear experimental evidence for the existence of communication channels between plants beyond those that have been recognized and studied thus far.
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Regulation of ABCB1/PGP1-catalysed auxin transport by linker phosphorylation.
EMBO J.
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Polar transport of the plant hormone auxin is controlled by PIN- and ABCB/PGP-efflux catalysts. PIN polarity is regulated by the AGC protein kinase, PINOID (PID), while ABCB activity was shown to be dependent on interaction with the FKBP42, TWISTED DWARF1 (TWD1). Using co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) and shotgun LC-MS/MS analysis, we identified PID as a valid partner in the interaction with TWD1. In-vitro and yeast expression analyses indicated that PID specifically modulates ABCB1-mediated auxin efflux in an action that is dependent on its kinase activity and that is reverted by quercetin binding and thus inhibition of PID autophosphorylation. Triple ABCB1/PID/TWD1 co-transfection in tobacco revealed that PID enhances ABCB1-mediated auxin efflux but blocks ABCB1 in the presence of TWD1. Phospho-proteomic analyses identified S634 as a key residue of the regulatory ABCB1 linker and a very likely target of PID phosphorylation that determines both transporter drug binding and activity. In summary, we provide evidence that PID phosphorylation has a dual, counter-active impact on ABCB1 activity that is coordinated by TWD1-PID interaction.
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Towards understanding plant bioacoustics.
Trends Plant Sci.
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Little is known about plant bioacoustics. Here, we present a rationale as to why the perception of sound and vibrations is likely to have also evolved in plants. We then explain how current evidence contributes to the view that plants may indeed benefit from mechanosensory mechanisms thus far unsuspected.
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Local root apex hypoxia induces NO-mediated hypoxic acclimation of the entire root.
Plant Cell Physiol.
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Roots are very sensitive to hypoxia and adapt effectively to a reduced availability of oxygen in the soil. However, the site of the root where oxygen availability is sensed and how roots acclimate to hypoxia remain unclear. In this study, we found that the root apex transition zone plays central roles in both sensing and adapting to root hypoxia. The exposure of cells of the root apex to hypoxia is sufficient to achieve hypoxic acclimation of the entire root; particularly relevant in this respect is that, of the entire root apex, the transition zone cells show the highest demand for oxygen and also emit the largest amount of nitric oxide (NO). Local root apex-specific oxygen deprivation dramatically inhibits the oxygen influx peak in the transition zone and simultaneously stimulates a local increase in NO emission. The hypoxia-induced efflux of NO is strictly associated with the transition zone and is essential for hypoxic acclimation of the entire root.
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The signal transducer NPH3 integrates the phototropin1 photosensor with PIN2-based polar auxin transport in Arabidopsis root phototropism.
Plant Cell
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Under blue light (BL) illumination, Arabidopsis thaliana roots grow away from the light source, showing a negative phototropic response. However, the mechanism of root phototropism is still unclear. Using a noninvasive microelectrode system, we showed that the BL sensor phototropin1 (phot1), the signal transducer NONPHOTOTROPIC HYPOCOTYL3 (NPH3), and the auxin efflux transporter PIN2 were essential for BL-induced auxin flux in the root apex transition zone. We also found that PIN2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) localized to vacuole-like compartments (VLCs) in dark-grown root epidermal and cortical cells, and phot1/NPH3 mediated a BL-initiated pathway that caused PIN2 redistribution to the plasma membrane. When dark-grown roots were exposed to brefeldin A (BFA), PIN2-GFP remained in VLCs in darkness, and BL caused PIN2-GFP disappearance from VLCs and induced PIN2-GFP-FM4-64 colocalization within enlarged compartments. In the nph3 mutant, both dark and BL BFA treatments caused the disappearance of PIN2-GFP from VLCs. However, in the phot1 mutant, PIN2-GFP remained within VLCs under both dark and BL BFA treatments, suggesting that phot1 and NPH3 play different roles in PIN2 localization. In conclusion, BL-induced root phototropism is based on the phot1/NPH3 signaling pathway, which stimulates the shootward auxin flux by modifying the subcellular targeting of PIN2 in the root apex transition zone.
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Swarming behavior in plant roots.
PLoS ONE
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Interactions between individuals that are guided by simple rules can generate swarming behavior. Swarming behavior has been observed in many groups of organisms, including humans, and recent research has revealed that plants also demonstrate social behavior based on mutual interaction with other individuals. However, this behavior has not previously been analyzed in the context of swarming. Here, we show that roots can be influenced by their neighbors to induce a tendency to align the directions of their growth. In the apparently noisy patterns formed by growing roots, episodic alignments are observed as the roots grow close to each other. These events are incompatible with the statistics of purely random growth. We present experimental results and a theoretical model that describes the growth of maize roots in terms of swarming.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.