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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Phase segregation of sulfonate groups in Nafion interface lamellae, quantified via neutron reflectometry fitting techniques for multi-layered structures.
Soft Matter
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2014
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Neutron reflectometry analysis methods for under-determined, multi-layered structures are developed and used to determine the composition depth profile in cases where the structure is not known a priori. These methods, including statistical methods, sophisticated fitting routines, and coupling multiple data sets, are applied to hydrated and dehydrated Nafion nano-scaled films with thicknesses comparable to those found coating electrode particles in fuel cell catalyst layers. These results confirm the lamellar structure previously observed on hydrophilic substrates, and demonstrate that for hydrated films they can accurately be described as layers rich in both water and sulfonate groups alternating with water-poor layers containing an excess of fluorocarbon groups. The thickness of these layers increases slightly and the amplitude of the water volume fraction oscillation exponentially decreases away from the hydrophilic interface. For dehydrated films, the composition oscillations die out more rapidly. The Nafion-SiO2 substrate interface contains a partial monolayer of sulfonate groups bonded to the substrate and a large excess of water compared to that expected by the water-to-sulfonate ratio, ?, observed throughout the rest of the film. Films that were made thin enough to truncate this lamellar region showed a depth profile nearly identical to thicker films, indicating that there are no confinement or surface effects altering the structure. Comparing the SLD profile measured for films dried at 60 °C to modeled composition profiles derived by removing water from the hydrated lamellae suggests incomplete re-mixing of the polymer groups upon dehydration, indicated limited polymer mobility in these Nafion thin films.
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Measuring fundamental properties in operating solid oxide electrochemical cells by using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.
Nat Mater
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2010
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Photoelectron spectroscopic measurements have the potential to provide detailed mechanistic insight by resolving chemical states, electrochemically active regions and local potentials or potential losses in operating solid oxide electrochemical cells (SOCs), such as fuel cells. However, high-vacuum requirements have limited X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of electrochemical cells to ex situ investigations. Using a combination of ambient-pressure XPS and CeO(2-x)/YSZ/Pt single-chamber cells, we carry out in situ spectroscopy to probe oxidation states of all exposed surfaces in operational SOCs at 750 °C in 1 mbar reactant gases H(2) and H(2)O. Kinetic energy shifts of core-level photoelectron spectra provide a direct measure of the local surface potentials and a basis for calculating local overpotentials across exposed interfaces. The mixed ionic/electronic conducting CeO(2-x) electrodes undergo Ce(3+)/Ce(4+) oxidation-reduction changes with applied bias. The simultaneous measurements of local surface Ce oxidation states and electric potentials reveal the active ceria regions during H(2) electro-oxidation and H(2)O electrolysis. The active regions extend ~150 ?m from the current collectors and are not limited by the three-phase-boundary interfaces associated with other SOC materials. The persistence of the Ce(3+)/Ce(4+) shifts in the ~150 ?m active region suggests that the surface reaction kinetics and lateral electron transport on the thin ceria electrodes are co-limiting processes.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.