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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Neurodevelopmental assessment after anesthesia in childhood: review of the literature and recommendations.
Anesth. Analg.
PUBLISHED: 08-20-2014
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Preclinical studies have established that anesthesia is toxic to the brain in neonatal animals, but scant research investigates the neurodevelopmental effects of exposure to anesthesia. In this article, we discuss the issue of outcome measurement of children after anesthesia administered between infancy and approximately 4 years of age. Recent studies are reviewed with the goal of understanding the contributions and limitations of the extant literature with respect to neurodevelopmental outcome. A review of school-based information (academic achievement and learning disability characterization), which are most frequently applied to measure cognitive outcome in cohort studies, is provided. The strengths and limitations of this literature is reviewed, followed by a discussion of how future trials investigating neurodevelopmental outcome after anesthesia might be improved by procedures designed specifically to assess the status of the central nervous system. Neuropsychological assessment is described and proposed as a way to increase the validity and sensitivity of forthcoming studies that intend to evaluate the short- and long-term effects of exposure to anesthesia during infancy and early childhood.
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The relationship of self-reported subclinical obsessive-compulsive symptoms and impulsivity among adults with AD/HD.
Psychiatry Res
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2014
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This study examined the degree to which subclinical obsessive-compulsive symptoms (SOCS) among individuals with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD) were associated with response inhibition difficulties on a performance-based test. Participants consisted of 64 adults with AD/HD who completed the Conner?s Continuous Performance Test, Second Edition (CPT-II), Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R), and the Brown Attention Deficit Disorder Scale (ADD Scale). Individuals with higher scores on the Obsessive-Compulsive Scale from the SCL-90-R made significantly more commission errors on the CPT-II; whereas other SCL-90-R scores did not demonstrate such a relationship. We did not find that SOCS were related to severity of AD/HD. These results supported the hypothesis that individuals with AD/HD with response inhibition difficulties tend to report more subclinical obsessive symptoms.
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Mitochondrial Polymorphisms Impact Outcomes after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.
J. Neurotrauma
PUBLISHED: 11-14-2013
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Abstract Patient outcomes are variable following severe traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, the biological underpinnings explaining this variability are unclear. Mitochondrial dysfunction after TBI is well documented, particularly in animal studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of mitochondrial polymorphisms on mitochondrial function and patient outcomes out to 1 year after a severe TBI in a human adult population. The Human MitoChip V2.0 was used to evaluate mitochondrial variants in an initial set of n=136 subjects. SNPs found to be significantly associated with patient outcomes [Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), Neurobehavioral Rating Scale (NRS), Disability Rating Scale (DRS), in-hospital mortality, and hospital length of stay] or neurochemical level (lactate:pyruvate ratio from cerebrospinal fluid) were further evaluated in an expanded sample of n=336 subjects. A10398G was associated with DRS at 6 and 12 months (p=0.02) and a significant time by SNP interaction for DRS was found (p=0.0013). The A10398 allele was associated with greater disability over time. There was a T195C by sex interaction for GOS (p=0.03) with the T195 allele associated with poorer outcomes in females. This is consistent with our findings that the T195 allele was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction (p=0.01), but only in females. This is the first study associating mitochondrial DNA variation with both mitochondrial function and neurobehavioral outcomes after TBI in humans. Our findings indicate that mitochondrial DNA variation may impact patient outcomes after a TBI potentially by influencing mitochondrial function, and that sex of the patient may be important in evaluating these associations in future studies.
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Symptomatology and Functional Outcome in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Results from the Prospective TRACK-TBI Study.
J. Neurotrauma
PUBLISHED: 10-31-2013
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Abstract Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI), or concussion, is a major public health concern. There is controversy in the literature regarding the true incidence of postconcussion syndrome (PCS), with the constellation of physical, cognitive, emotional, and sleep symptoms after mTBI. In the current study, we report on the incidence and evolution of PCS symptoms and patient outcomes after mTBI at 3, 6, and 12 months in a large, prospective cohort of mTBI patients. Participants were identified as part of the prospective, multi-center Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury Study. The study population was mTBI patients (Glasgow Coma Scale score of 13-15) presenting to the emergency department, including patients with a negative head computed tomography discharged to home without admission to hospital; 375 mTBI subjects were included in the analysis. At both 6 and 12 months after mTBI, 82% (n=250 of 305 and n=163 of 199, respectively) of patients reported at least one PCS symptom. Further, 44.5 and 40.3% of patients had significantly reduced Satisfaction With Life scores at 6 and 12 months, respectively. At 3 months after injury, 33% of the mTBI subjects were functionally impaired (Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended score ?6); 22.4% of the mTBI subjects available for follow-up were still below full functional status at 1 year after injury. The term "mild" continues to be a misnomer for this patient population and underscores the critical need for evolving classification strategies for TBI for targeted therapy.
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Neurological outcome scale for traumatic brain injury: III. Criterion-related validity and sensitivity to change in the NABIS hypothermia-II clinical trial.
J. Neurotrauma
PUBLISHED: 08-02-2013
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The neurological outcome scale for traumatic brain injury (NOS-TBI) is a measure assessing neurological functioning in patients with TBI. We hypothesized that the NOS-TBI would exhibit adequate concurrent and predictive validity and demonstrate more sensitivity to change, compared with other well-established outcome measures. We analyzed data from the National Acute Brain Injury Study: Hypothermia-II clinical trial. Participants were 16-45 years of age with severe TBI assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury. For analysis of criterion-related validity (concurrent and predictive), Spearmans rank-order correlations were calculated between the NOS-TBI and the glasgow outcome scale (GOS), GOS-extended (GOS-E), disability rating scale (DRS), and neurobehavioral rating scale-revised (NRS-R). Concurrent validity was demonstrated through significant correlations between the NOS-TBI and GOS, GOS-E, DRS, and NRS-R measured contemporaneously at 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury (all p<0.0013). For prediction analyses, the multiplicity-adjusted p value using the false discovery rate was <0.015. The 1-month NOS-TBI score was a significant predictor of outcome in the GOS, GOS-E, and DRS at 3 and 6 months postinjury (all p<0.015). The 3-month NOS-TBI significantly predicted GOS, GOS-E, DRS, and NRS-R outcomes at 6 and 12 months postinjury (all p<0.0015). Sensitivity to change was analyzed using Wilcoxons signed rank-sum test of subsamples demonstrating no change in the GOS or GOS-E between 3 and 6 months. The NOS-TBI demonstrated higher sensitivity to change, compared with the GOS (p<0.038) and GOS-E (p<0.016). In summary, the NOS-TBI demonstrated adequate concurrent and predictive validity as well as sensitivity to change, compared with gold-standard outcome measures. The NOS-TBI may enhance prediction of outcome in clinical practice and measurement of outcome in TBI research.
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Differences in medical therapy goals for children with severe traumatic brain injury-an international study.
Pediatr Crit Care Med
PUBLISHED: 07-19-2013
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To describe the differences in goals for their usual practice for various medical therapies from a number of international centers for children with severe traumatic brain injury.
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Comparison of hypothermia and normothermia after severe traumatic brain injury in children (Cool Kids): a phase 3, randomised controlled trial.
Lancet Neurol
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2013
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On the basis of mixed results from previous trials, we assessed whether therapeutic hypothermia for 48-72 h with slow rewarming improved mortality in children after brain injury.
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Prospective independent validation of IMPACT modeling as a prognostic tool in severe traumatic brain injury.
J. Neurotrauma
PUBLISHED: 12-01-2011
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Clinical trials in traumatic brain injury (TBI) have been fraught with failure due in part to heterogeneity in pathology and insensitive outcome measurements. The International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) prognostic model has been purposed as a means of risk adjustment and outcome prediction for use in trial design and analysis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the IMPACT model in predicting 6-month functional outcome and mortality using prospectively collected data at a large, Level 1 neurotrauma center. This population-based cohort study included all TBI patients ?14 years of age admitted with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of ?8 (severe TBI) to the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center between July 1994 and May 2009. Clinical data were prospectively collected and linked to 6-month functional outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale [GOS]) and mortality. The discriminatory power and calibration of the three iterations of the IMPACT model (core, extended, and lab) were assessed using multiple regression analyses and indicated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). A sample of 587 patients was available for analysis; the mean age was 37.8±17 years. The median 6-month GOS was 3 (IQR 3); 6-month mortality was 41%. The prognostic models were composed of age, motor score, and pupillary reactivity (core model), Marshall grade on head CT and secondary insults (extended), and laboratory values (lab); all of these displayed good prediction ability for unfavorable outcome and mortality (unfavorable outcome AUC=0.76, 0.79, 0.76; mortality AUC=0.78, 0.83, 0.83, respectively). All model iterations displayed adequate calibration for predicting unfavorable outcome and mortality. Prospective, independent validation supports the IMPACT prognostic models prediction of patient 6-month functional status and mortality after severe TBI. The IMPACT prognostic model is an effective instrument to assist TBI study design and analysis.
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Common data elements for pediatric traumatic brain injury: recommendations from the biospecimens and biomarkers workgroup.
J. Neurotrauma
PUBLISHED: 11-22-2011
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Biospecimens represent a critically important resource in pediatric brain injury research. Data from these specimens can be used to identify and classify injury, understand the molecular mechanisms underlying different types of brain injury, and ultimately identify therapeutic targets to tailor treatments for individual patient needs. To realize the full potential of biospecimens in pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI), standardization and adoption of best practice guidelines are needed to ensure the quality and consistency of specimens. Multiple groups, including the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories (ISBER), and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), have previously published best practice guidelines for biospecimen resources. Recommendations have also been provided by the Biospecimens and Biomarkers Workgroup of the interagency TBI Common Data Elements (CDE) initiative. The recommendations from all of these sources, however, focus exclusively on adult biospecimen collection. There are no published pediatric-specific biospecimen collection guidelines. An additional workgroup was formed to specifically address this gap. The aim of the Pediatric TBI CDE Biospecimens and Biomarkers Workgroup was to provide recommendations for best practice guidelines to standardize the quality and accessibility of biospecimens for pediatric brain injury research in general, and for pediatric TBI research in particular. Consensus recommendations were developed by review of previously published adult-specific recommendations, including the recommendations of the original TBI Common Data Elements Biospecimens and Biomarkers Workgroup, and by participation in the interagency workshop "Common Data Elements for TBI Research: Pediatric Considerations," held in Houston, Texas in March of 2010. These recommendations represent expert opinion on this subject. The authors of this article were members of the Biospecimens Workgroup. We hope that with adoption of these best practices, future investigators will be able to obtain biospecimens in a consistent way that meets the needs of pediatric patients, and helps to accelerate acquisition of pediatric-specific biomarker data.
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Recommendations for the use of common outcome measures in pediatric traumatic brain injury research.
J. Neurotrauma
PUBLISHED: 08-24-2011
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This article addresses the need for age-relevant outcome measures for traumatic brain injury (TBI) research and summarizes the recommendations by the inter-agency Pediatric TBI Outcomes Workgroup. The Pediatric Workgroups recommendations address primary clinical research objectives including characterizing course of recovery from TBI, prediction of later outcome, measurement of treatment effects, and comparison of outcomes across studies. Consistent with other Common Data Elements (CDE) Workgroups, the Pediatric TBI Outcomes Workgroup adopted the standard three-tier system in its selection of measures. In the first tier, core measures included valid, robust, and widely applicable outcome measures with proven utility in pediatric TBI from each identified domain including academics, adaptive and daily living skills, family and environment, global outcome, health-related quality of life, infant and toddler measures, language and communication, neuropsychological impairment, physical functioning, psychiatric and psychological functioning, recovery of consciousness, social role participation and social competence, social cognition, and TBI-related symptoms. In the second tier, supplemental measures were recommended for consideration in TBI research focusing on specific topics or populations. In the third tier, emerging measures included important instruments currently under development, in the process of validation, or nearing the point of published findings that have significant potential to be superior to measures in the core and supplemental lists and may eventually replace them as evidence for their utility emerges.
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Processing speed and working memory performance in those with both ADHD and a reading disorder compared with those with ADHD alone.
Arch Clin Neuropsychol
PUBLISHED: 05-25-2011
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In previous studies, children with both Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and a Reading Disorder were found to have more difficulties with processing speed, working memory, and timed as opposed to non-timed executive functioning (EF) measures when compared with those with either disorder alone. The current study found that older adolescents and adults with both disorders also had more difficulties on processing speed and working memory measures than individuals who only had ADHD. There were no differences among non-timed EF scores. These results add support to the premise that common underlying features may be contributing to the high co-morbidity between these disorders and associated cognitive weaknesses.
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BCL2 genotypes: functional and neurobehavioral outcomes after severe traumatic brain injury.
J. Neurotrauma
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2010
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Traumatic brain injury (TBI) triggers a cascade of apoptotic-related events that include BCL2 expression, a pro-survival protein in the apoptosis pathway. The purpose of this study was to use tagging single nucleotide polymorphism (tSNP) genotypes to screen the BCL2 gene to determine if genetic variability in the BCL2 gene influences outcomes in 205 patients with severe TBI. Outcomes (Glasgow Outcome Scale [GOS], Disability Rating Scale [DRS], mortality, and Neurobehavioral Rating Scale-Revised [NRS-R]) were analyzed at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Multivariate analysis demonstrates that there were four tSNPs of significant interest: rs17759659, rs1801018, rs7236090, and rs949037. Presence of the variant allele for rs17759659 was associated with poorer outcomes (GOS p = 0.001; DRS p = 0.002), higher mortality (p = 0.02; OR = 4.23; CI 1.31,13.61), and worse NRS-R scores (p = 0.05). Presence of the variant allele for rs1801018 was associated with poorer outcomes (GOS p = 0.02; DRS p = 0.009), and mortality (p = 0.03; OR = 3.86; CI 1.18,12.59). Being homozygous for the wild-type allele for rs7236090 was associated with favorable outcomes on the NRS-R (p = 0.007), while homozygosity for the variant genotype was associated with favorable outcomes on the GOS (p = 0.007) and DRS (p = 0.006). The homozygous variant for rs949037 was associated with favorable outcomes (GOS p = 0.04; DRS p = 0.03), and the homozygous wild-type was associated with increased mortality at 3 months (p = 0.005; OR = 3.67; CI 1.08,12.49). The only finding that stood up to Bonferroni correction was rs17759659 for GOS. These data support the possibility that genetic variability for pro-survival proteins, particularly genetic variation in the BCL2 gene, impacts outcomes after severe TBI.
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Acute brain injury and therapeutic hypothermia in the PICU: A rehabilitation perspective.
J Pediatr Rehabil Med
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2009
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Acquired brain injury from traumatic brain injury, cardiac arrest (CA), stroke, and central nervous system infection is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the pediatric population and reason for admission to inpatient rehabilitation. Therapeutic hypothermia is the only intervention shown to have efficacy from bench to bedside in improving neurological outcome after birth asphyxia and adult arrhythmia-induced CA, thought to be due to its multiple mechanisms of action. Research to determine if therapeutic hypothermia should be applied to other causes of brain injury and how to best apply it is underway in children and adults. Changes in clinical practice in the hospitalized brain-injured child may have effects on rehabilitation referral practices, goals and strategies of therapies offered, and may increase the degree of complex medical problems seen in children referred to inpatient rehabilitation.
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High-definition fiber tracking for assessment of neurological deficit in a case of traumatic brain injury: finding, visualizing, and interpreting small sites of damage.
J. Neurosurg.
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For patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), current clinical imaging methods generally do not provide highly detailed information about the location of axonal injury, severity of injury, or expected recovery. In a case of severe TBI, the authors applied a novel high-definition fiber tracking (HDFT) to directly visualize and quantify the degree of axonal fiber damage and predict functional deficits due to traumatic axonal injury and loss of cortical projections. This 32-year-old man sustained a severe TBI. Computed tomography and MRI revealed an area of hemorrhage in the basal ganglia with mass effect, but no specific information on the location of axonal injury could be obtained from these studies. Examinations of the patient at Week 3 and Week 8 after TBI revealed motor weaknesses of the left extremities. Four months postinjury, 257-direction diffusion spectrum imaging and HDFT analysis was performed to evaluate the degree of axonal damage in the motor pathway and quantify asymmetries in the left and right axonal pathways. High-definition fiber tracking was used to follow corticospinal and corona radiata pathways from the cortical surface to the midbrain and quantify projections from motor areas. Axonal damage was then localized by assessing the number of descending fibers at the level of the cortex, internal capsule, and midbrain. The motor deficit apparent in the clinical examinations correlated with the axonal losses visualized using HDFT. Fiber loss estimates at 4 months postinjury accurately predicted the nature of the motor deficits (severe, focal left-hand weakness) when other standard clinical imaging modalities did not. A repeat scan at 10 months postinjury, when edema and hemorrhage had receded, replicated the fiber loss. Using HDFT, the authors accurately identified the presence and location of damage to the underlying white matter in this patient with TBI. Detailed information of injury provided by this novel technique holds future potential for precise neuroimaging assessment of TBI.
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Executive functioning, cortisol reactivity, and symptoms of psychopathology in girls with premature adrenarche.
Dev. Psychopathol.
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The study examined the interaction between early maturational timing (measured by premature adrenarche [PA]) and executive functioning and cortisol reactivity on symptoms of psychopathology. The study included 76 girls aged 6 through 8 years (mean = 7.50, SD = 0.85) with PA (n = 40) and on-time adrenarche (n = 36). Girls completed a battery of psychological and neuropsychological tests and blood sampling for cortisol. Parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist. The results demonstrated that girls with PA with lower levels of executive functioning had higher externalizing and anxious symptoms compared to other girls. In addition, girls with PA who demonstrated increases in serum cortisol had higher externalizing symptoms than those with stable patterns. Finally, girls with PA who demonstrated decreases in cortisol reported higher depressive symptoms. The findings from this study provide important information concerning the impact of cognitive functioning and stress reactivity on adjustment to early maturation in girls with PA. The results of this research may inform screening and intervention efforts for girls who may be at greatest risk for emotional and behavioral problems as a result of early maturation.
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Validity of a pediatric version of the Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended.
J. Neurotrauma
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The Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) and its most recent revision, the GOS-Extended (GOS-E), provide the gold standard for measuring traumatic brain injury (TBI) outcome. The GOS-E exhibits validity when used with adults and some adolescents, but validity with younger children is not established. Because the GOS-E lacks the developmental specificity necessary to evaluate children, toddlers, and infants, we modified the original version to create the GOS-E Pediatric Revision (GOS-E Peds), a developmentally appropriate structured interview, to classify younger patients. The criterion, predictive, and discriminant validity of the GOS-E Peds was measured in 159 subjects following TBI (mild: 36%; moderate: 12%; severe: 50%) at 3 and 6 months after injury. Participants were included from two studies completed at the Pediatric Neurotrauma Center at Childrens Hospital of Pittsburgh. We assessed the relationship among GOS-E Peds, the GOS, and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales as well as other standardized measures of functional, behavioral, intellectual, and neuropsychological outcome. Premorbid function was assessed 24-36?h after injury. The GOS-E Peds showed a strong correlation with the GOS at 3 and 6 month time points. Criterion-related validity was also indicated by GOS-E Peds association with most measures at both time points and at injury severity levels. The 3 month GOS-E Peds was associated with the 6 month GOS-E Peds, everyday function, behavior, and most cognitive abilities. Discriminant validity is suggested by weak correlations between both 3 and 6 month GOS-E Peds and premorbid measures. The GOS-E Peds is sensitive to severity of injury and is associated with changes in TBI sequelae over time. This pediatric revision provides a valid outcome measure in infants, toddlers, children, and adolescents through age 16. Findings support using the GOS-E Peds as the primary outcome variable in pediatric clinical trials.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.