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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Fever of unknown origin in a patient with red ears: relapsing polychondritis.
BMJ Case Rep
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2014
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Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune disease that affects cartilage and multiple organ system. We describe a case of RP presenting with fever, conjunctivitis and inflammatory signs of the right knee. Infectious and neoplastic diseases were excluded by imaging and laboratory examinations. After 17 days of admission the patient reported coughing and odynophagia, and, a physical examination showed red ears. Otorhinolaryngological examination demonstrated arytenoid chondritis. RP was diagnosed based on four McAdam's criteria. The patient was medicated with oral prednisone, and a positive clinical response was noted. Severe disease may require high doses of corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agents and the biological treatment may be beneficial. Beginning manifestations, such as fever, are often unspecific, leading to RP misdiagnosis. In this case, close attention to the patient's clinical history and a detailed physical examination were fundamental in concluding the correct diagnosis, and consequently beginning the appropriate medication.
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Metal accumulation and oxidative stress responses in Ulva spp. in the presence of nocturnal pulses of metals from sediment: A field transplantation experiment under eutrophic conditions.
Mar. Environ. Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-07-2013
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In aquatic systems under eutrophic conditions, remobilization of metals from sediment to the overlying water may occur. Consequently, adaptive responses of local organisms could result from the accumulation of metals intermittently released from the sediment. In summer 2007, a field transplantation experiment was performed in the Óbidos lagoon (Portugal) with Ulva spp. comprising three short-term exposures (between 15:30-23:30; 23:30-07:30; 07:30-15:30) during a 24-h period. In each period, Ulva spp. was collected at a reference site located in the lower lagoon (LL) and transplanted to a eutrophic site located at the Barrosa branch (BB), characterized by moderate metal contamination. For comparison purposes, macroalgae samples were simultaneously exposed at LL under the same conditions. Both sites were surveyed in short-time scales (2-4 h) for the analysis of the variability of physical-chemical parameters in the water and metal levels in suspended particulate matter. The ratios to Al of particulate Mn, Fe, Cu and Pb increased during the period of lower water oxygenation at the eutrophic site, reaching 751 × 10(-4), 0.67, 12 × 10(-4), 9.9 × 10(-4), respectively, confirming the release of metals from the sediment to water during the night. At the reference site, dissolved oxygen oscillated around 100%, Mn/Al ratios were considerably lower (81 × 10(-4)-301 × 10(-4)) compared to BB (234 × 10(-)(4)-790 × 10(-4)), and no increases of metal/Al ratios were found during the night. In general, algae uptake of Mn, Cu, Fe, Pb and Cd was significantly higher at the eutrophic site compared to the reference site. The results confirmed the potential of Ulva spp. as bioindicator of metal contamination and its capability to respond within short periods. An induction of SOD, an inhibition of CAT and the increase of LPO were recorded in Ulva spp. exposed at BB (between 23:30 and 7:30) probably as a response to the higher incorporation of Mn, Fe and Pb in combination with the lack of dissolved oxygen in the water. Current findings emphasize the importance of assessing, in eutrophic systems, the relationship between the variability of chemical conditions and its repercussions on autochthonous organisms over day-night cycles.
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How complementary are epibenthic assemblages in artificial and nearby natural rocky reefs?
Mar. Environ. Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2013
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The present study analyses the composition, structure and trophic function of epibenthic assemblages in two artificial reefs (ARs) 16 years after deployment and in nearby natural reefs (NRs), aiming at providing insights on the complementarity between both habitats. Current findings suggest that after 16 years the ARs (concrete blocks), located in southern Portugal, do not act as surrogates for NRs, as epibenthic assemblages differed between reef types in composition, structure and trophic function. NRs showed higher diversity and complementarity (i.e. beta-diversity) than ARs, evidencing higher redundancy. Higher heterogeneity within NRs was also evidenced by the multi-dimensional scaling analysis based on abundance, biomass and trophic composition. NRs presented higher abundance of molluscs and biomass of sponges, resulting in differences in the trophic function: suspension-feeding dominated the NRs, while within ARs there was an ascendency of carnivory. Although not acting as surrogates for NRs and provided that no adverse effects (e.g. establishment of non-native species) were detected, ARs may have a significant contribution for the increase of regional diversity, as evidenced by the highest complementarity levels observed between assemblages in both reefs.
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Mauriac syndrome still exists.
Endocrinol Nutr
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2013
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Mauriac syndrome (MS) is a rare complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1). It is related to low insulin concentrations and is less common since longer-acting insulins became available. It is characterized by hepatomegaly, growth and puberty delay, and the presence of elevated transaminases and serum lipids. The aim of this study was to describe the patients from a pediatric diabetic population that fulfill the criteria of MS.
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Development of an in vitro dendritic cell-based test for skin sensitizer identification.
Chem. Res. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2013
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The sensitizing potential of chemicals is currently assessed using animal models. However, ethical and economic concerns and the recent European legislative framework triggered intensive research efforts in the development and validation of alternative methods. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop an in vitro predictive test based on the analysis and integration of gene expression and intracellular signaling profiles of chemical-exposed skin-derived dendritic cells. Cells were treated with four known sensitizers and two nonsensitizers, and the effects on the expression of 20 candidate genes and the activation of MAPK, PI3K/Akt, and NF-?B signaling pathways were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. Genes Trxr1, Hmox1, Nqo1, and Cxcl10 and the p38 MAPK and JNK signaling pathways were identified as good predictor variables and used to construct a dichotomous classifier. For validation of the model, 12 new chemicals were then analyzed in a blind assay, and from these, 11 were correctly classified. Considering the total of 18 compounds tested here, 17 were correctly classified, representing a concordance of 94%, with a sensitivity of 92% (12 of 13 sensitizers identified) and a specificity of 100% (5 of 5 nonsensitizers identified). Additionally, we tested the ability of our model to discriminate sensitizers from nonallergenic but immunogenic compounds such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS was correctly classified as a nonsensitizer. Overall, our results indicate that the analysis of proposed gene and signaling pathway signatures in a mouse fetal skin-derived dendritic cell line represents a valuable model to be integrated in a future in vitro test platform.
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A comprehensive analysis of the physiological and anatomical components involved in higher water loss rates after leaf development at high humidity.
J. Plant Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2013
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To better understand the poor regulation of water loss after leaf development at high relative air humidity (RH), the relative importance of the physiological and anatomical components was analyzed focusing on cultivars with a contrasting sensitivity to elevated RH. The stomatal responsiveness to three closing stimuli (desiccation, abscisic acid feeding, light/dark transition), as well as several stomatal features (density, index, size and pore dimensions) and the cuticular transpiration rate (CTR) were determined in four rose cultivars, grown under moderate (60%) and high (95%) RH. Moreover, the effects of changes in stomatal density and pore dimensions on the stomatal conductance (gs) were quantified using a modified version of the Brown and Escombe equation. Higher water loss, as a result of plant growth at high RH, was primarily caused by an increase in residual gs, and to a lesser extent due to higher CTR. It was estimated that in leaflets subjected to desiccation the enhanced gs in high RH- as compared to moderate RH-grown plants was mostly due to poor stomatal functionality and to a lesser extent the combined result of higher stomatal density and longer pore length. It is concluded that the reduced degree and, specially, the reduced rate of stomatal closure are the primary causes of the large genotypic variation in the control of water loss in high RH-grown plants. Furthermore, it was found that although changes in stomatal length have no influence on stomatal functionality, changed anatomical features per se represent a significant and direct contribution to the increased water loss.
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Use-wear patterns on wild macaque stone tools reveal their behavioural history.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Burmese long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis aurea) are one of a limited number of wild animal species to use stone tools, with their tool use focused on pounding shelled marine invertebrates foraged from intertidal habitats. These monkeys exhibit two main styles of tool use: axe hammering of oysters, and pound hammering of unattached encased foods. In this study, we examined macroscopic use-wear patterns on a sample of 60 wild macaque stone tools from Piak Nam Yai Island, Thailand, that had been collected following behavioural observation, in order to (i) quantify the wear patterns in terms of the types and distribution of use-damage on the stones, and (ii) develop a Use-Action Index (UAI) to differentiate axe hammers from pound hammers by wear patterns alone. We used the intensity of crushing damage on differing surface zones of the stones, as well as stone weight, to produce a UAI that had 92% concordance when compared to how the stones had been used by macaques, as observed independently prior to collection. Our study is the first to demonstrate that quantitative archaeological use-wear techniques can accurately reconstruct the behavioural histories of non-human primate stone tools.
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Environmental quality assessment combining sediment metal levels, biomarkers and macrobenthic communities: application to the Óbidos coastal lagoon (Portugal).
Environ Monit Assess
PUBLISHED: 08-04-2011
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Macroinvertebrate benthic communities are one of the key biological components considered for the assessment of benthic integrity in the context of the Water Framework Directive (WFD). However, under moderate contamination scenarios, the assessment of macrobenthic alterations at community level alone could be insufficient to discriminate the environmental quality of coastal and transitional waters. Keeping this in view, sediment quality of moderately contaminated sites in a coastal lagoon (Óbidos lagoon, Portugal) was assessed by the combination of sediment metal levels, Carcinus maenas biomarkers (accumulated metals and oxidative stress responses) and macrobenthic communities. Two sites were selected in confined inner branches (BS and BB) and a third one in the middle lagoon (ML). The site BB presented slightly higher levels of metals in sediment but biological variables calculated for macrobenthic data were not significantly different between sites. The biotic index M-AMBI that is being applied to assess environmental quality of transitional waters in the scope of the WFD pointed either to high (site ML) or good quality status (BS and BB) in the selected sites. However, crabs from BB site presented significantly higher levels of Ni in hepatopancreas than those from ML and macrobenthic community structure was significantly different between BB and ML. Additionally, spatial differences were obtained for oxidative stress parameters suggesting that BB site presented stressors for crabs (higher GST and lower GSH(t) at BB site). Factor analysis (PCA) integrating sediment contamination, biomarkers in crabs and macrobenthic data also distinguished BB site as the most environmentally disturbed. On the other hand, at ML site, some macrobenthic variables (equitability and polychaetes diversity) were found to be enhanced by current environmental conditions, suggesting the existence of a better sediment quality. Current results pointed to the usefulness of integrating macrobenthic community alterations with responses at organism level (bioaccumulation and biochemical endpoints) in order to increase the accuracy of environmental quality assessment in lagoon systems. Moreover, the application of different statistical methods was also found to be recommendable.
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Avoiding high relative air humidity during critical stages of leaf ontogeny is decisive for stomatal functioning.
Physiol Plant
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2011
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Plants of several species, if grown at high relative air humidity (RH ?85%), develop stomata that fail to close fully in case of low leaf water potential. We studied the effect of a reciprocal change in RH, at different stages of leaf expansion of Rosa hybrida grown at moderate (60%) or high (95%) RH, on the stomatal closing ability. This was assessed by measuring the leaf transpiration rate in response to desiccation once the leaves had fully expanded. For leaves that started expanding at high RH but completed their expansion after transfer to moderate RH, the earlier this switch took place the better the stomatal functioning. Leaves initially expanding at moderate RH and transferred to high RH exhibited poor stomatal functioning, even when this transfer occurred very late during leaf expansion. Applying a daily abscisic acid (ABA) solution to the leaves of plants grown at continuous high RH was effective in inducing stomatal closure at low water potential, if done before full leaf expansion (FLE). After FLE, stomatal functioning was no longer affected either by the RH or ABA level. The results indicate that the degree of stomatal adaptation depends on both the timing and duration of exposure to high RH. It is concluded that stomatal functionality is strongly dependent on the humidity at which the leaf completed its expansion. The data also show that the effect of ambient RH and the alleviating role of ABA are restricted to the period of leaf expansion.
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[Economic analysis of rituximab in combination with cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisolone in the treatment of patients with advanced follicular lymphoma in Portugal].
Acta Med Port
PUBLISHED: 12-28-2010
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Evaluate costs and benefits of rituximab in combination with cyclophosphamide/vincristine/prednisolone chemotherapy regimen (R-CVP), in previously untreated patients with indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), compared to CVP alone from a Portuguese National Health System (NHS) perspective.
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Factors structuring temporal and spatial dynamics of macrobenthic communities in a eutrophic coastal lagoon (Óbidos lagoon, Portugal).
Mar. Environ. Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2010
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The present work aimed to identify the main environmental drivers shaping temporal and spatial dynamics of macrobenthic communities within a eutrophic coastal lagoon. Sediments in the Óbidos lagoon showed a gradient of increasing metal contamination from the inlet area to inner branches. The mid-lower lagoon area exhibited an intermediate contaminated condition between the inlet and upstream areas, suggesting that the effects of the organic loadings into the lagoon may be reflected until this area. This transitional feature was corroborated by biological data, with macrobenthic assemblages displaying characteristics of down- and upstream areas. Macrobenthic abundance peaked in winter, which was associated with a higher nutrient availability (mainly ammonium) and the proliferation of green macroalgae in mid-lower and inner lagoon areas. However, massive macroalgae growth resulted in a sharp decrease of macrobenthic diversity and abundance in spring, particularly where the higher amounts of decaying algae were detected. Higher dissimilarities between assemblages were detected during winter (and spring, for trophic composition), while in summer, differences were highly attenuated. The least contaminated area (close to the sea inlet) experienced smaller temporal variations for environmental variables, as well as the lowest temporal biological variability. This area was dominated by carnivores, which were related with increased salinity. Deposit-feeders were numerically dominant in the lagoon, being generally spread within organically enriched sandy and muddy areas. The high concentration of chlorophyll a and suspended particulate matter in water was reflected in the abundance of deposit-feeders/suspension-feeders, taking benefit of the high primary productivity. On the other hand, deposit-feeders/herbivores responded to the decay of macroalgae mats in the sediment. Biological associations varied with the biological data used (taxonomic versus trophic group composition; abundance versus biomass), highlighting the relevance of the combination of different data analysis approaches. In general, BIOENV analysis indicated total phosphorus, biomass of Ulva, metals and organic carbon and nitrogen as being significantly influencing benthic patterns. On the other hand, discrepancies in ecological behaviours of some taxa were also detected in the present study stressing the need for additional studies on the relationships between macrobenthic communities and environmental variables. Implications of the present results for monitoring studies are discussed.
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Daily availability of nutrients and metals in a eutrophic meso-tidal coastal lagoon (Obidos lagoon, Portugal).
Mar. Pollut. Bull.
PUBLISHED: 04-26-2010
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This baseline reports daily variations of physico-chemical parameters, nutrients and metals in water of two sites [eutrophic conditions (BB) versus reference (LL)] in Obidos coastal lagoon (Portugal). Dissolved oxygen in BB varied between 40% saturation levels (night) and 190% (daylight). NH(4)(+), PO(4)(3-) and ratios to Al of Mn, Fe and Pb in suspended particulate matter increased during the period of lower oxygenation, indicating exportation of nutrients and metals from the sediment to water at night. At LL, O(2) values oscillated always around 100%. PO(4)(3-) and Mn/Al ratio at LL were always lower than at BB and no increases were found during the night. The input of PO(4)(3-) and Mn provided from the sediment at BB during the night could surpass the contribution of freshwater discharges. PCA confirmed the separation of most samples from BB and LL. These results pointed to the importance of assessing chemical conditions over day-night cycles.
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Tool-composite reuse in wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): archaeologically invisible steps in the technological evolution of early hominins?
Anim Cogn
PUBLISHED: 07-22-2009
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Recent etho-archaeological studies of stone-tool use by wild chimpanzees have contributed valuable data towards elucidating the variables that influenced the emergence and development of the first lithic industries among Plio-Pleistocene hominins. Such data help to identify potential behaviours entailed in the first percussive technologies that are invisible in archaeological records. The long-term research site of Bossou in Guinea features a unique chimpanzee community whose members systematically use portable stones as hammers and anvils to crack open nuts in natural as well as in field experimental settings. Here we present the first analysis of repeated reuse of the same tool-composites in wild chimpanzees. Data collected over 5 years of experimental nut-cracking sessions at an "outdoor laboratory" site were assessed for the existence of systematic patterns in the selection of tool-composites, at group and at individual levels. Chimpanzees combined certain stones as hammer and anvil more often than expected by chance, even when taking into account preferences for individual stones by themselves. This may reflect an ability to recognise the nut-cracker as a single tool (composed of two elements, but functional only as a whole), as well as discrimination of tool quality-effectiveness. Through repeatedly combining the same pairs of stones--whether due to preferences for particular composites or for the two elements independently--tool-users may amplify use-wear traces and increase the likelihood of fracturing the stones, and thus of detaching pieces by battering.
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Primate archaeology.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2009
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All modern humans use tools to overcome limitations of our anatomy and to make difficult tasks easier. However, if tool use is such an advantage, we may ask why it is not evolved to the same degree in other species. To answer this question, we need to bring a long-term perspective to the material record of other members of our own order, the Primates.
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Serum leptin levels in overweight children and adolescents.
Br. J. Nutr.
PUBLISHED: 07-09-2009
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Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone which plays a key role in energy homeostasis. Our aim was to determine the relationship between serum leptin and clinical and biochemical features in overweight children and adolescents. Overweight children and adolescents followed in this Unit with serum leptin ascertained were included. Clinical, biochemical and abdominal ultrasound data were analysed. Statistical analysis was performed by t test, chi2, Pearsons correlation and linear regression. One outlier of serum leptin was excluded to perform correlation and regression. Serum leptin was determined in 357 patients. At the first visit, the mean age was 9.5 (sd 3.2) years and mean BMI z-score was 1.72 (sd 1.34) (girls 1.71 (sd 1.16); boys 1.72 (sd 1.11)). Serum leptin levels were significantly related to: sex (mean: girls 48.0 ng/ml, boys 34.4 ng/ml; P = 0.003); Tanner stage (mean: I-II 37.0 ng/ml, III-V 45.2 ng/ml; P = 0.035); systolic blood pressure (mean: normal 41.3 ng/ml, high 44.0 ng/ml; P = 0.009); BMI z-score (r 0.136; P = 0.010); C-peptide (r 0.17; P = 0.002); insulin (r 0.34; P < 0.001); homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (r 0.25; P < 0.001) and aspartate aminotransferase (r - 0.12; P = 0.023). In the multivariate analysis (with leptin as the dependent variable and sex, Tanner stage, BMI z-score, systolic blood pressure, aspartate aminotransferase, C-peptide, insulin and HOMA-IR as independent variables), sex and BMI were determinant factors. The present study in overweight children and adolescents showed that being female and greater BMI were significantly and independently associated with increased serum leptin. In this large cohort other associations with leptin described in the literature can be discharged.
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Huffmanela sp. (Nematoda: Trichosomoididae) muscular parasite from Trisopterus luscus captured off the Portuguese coast.
Dis. Aquat. Org.
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2009
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Four samples of Trisopterus luscus exhibiting unusual black spots on their musculature were obtained from catches made on different days and were rejected as unsuitable for consumption. Bipolar eggs somewhat resembling those of the nematode genus Huffmanela (Nematoda: Trichosomoididae) were identified as the cause of these black spots. Microscopic analysis revealed the presence of dark-shelled trichinelloid embryonated eggs dispersed throughout the muscle tissue, 73 to 94 x 40 to 59 microm in size, with large polar plugs 14 to 22 microm wide. However, the morphology and distribution of the observed eggs were not compatible with any previously described Huffmanela species. Intracellular nematodes were also observed in muscle cells. In 2 samples, sectioned nematode specimens were observed in other locations as well: the lymphatic vessel of intestine submucosa and the dermal lymphatic vessel. This could be due to nematode migration inside the infected fish. The presumed identification of Huffmanela sp. in a new host (Trisopterus luscus), and in a new location (Atlantic Ocean) supports the belief that these parasites could be widely distributed, particularly in marine fishes. In view of these factors, together with the observed egg morphology, it is possible that these specimens represent a new, unidentified Huffmanela species.
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Epidemiology of mechanical ventilation: analysis of the SAPS 3 database.
Intensive Care Med
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2009
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To evaluate current practice of mechanical ventilation in the ICU and the characteristics and outcomes of patients receiving it.
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Mortality assessment in patients with severe acute pancreatitis: a comparative study of specific and general severity indices.
Rev Bras Ter Intensiva
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This study compared the general and specific severity indices to assess the prognosis of severe acute pancreatitis at a polyvalent intensive care unit.
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A virtual plant that responds to the environment like a real one: the case for chrysanthemum.
New Phytol.
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• Plants respond to environmental change through alterations in organ size, number and biomass. However, different phenotypes are rarely integrated in a single model, and the prediction of plant responses to environmental conditions is challenging. The aim of this study was to simulate and predict plant phenotypic plasticity in development and growth using an organ-level functional-structural plant model, GreenLab. • Chrysanthemum plants were grown in climate chambers in 16 different environmental regimes: four different temperatures (15, 18, 21 and 24°C) combined with four different light intensities (40%, 51%, 65% and 100%, where 100% is 340 ?mol m?² s?¹). Measurements included plant height, flower number and major organ dry mass (main and side-shoot stems, main and side-shoot leaves and flowers). To describe the basipetal flowering sequence, a position-dependent growth delay function was introduced into the model. • The model was calibrated on eight treatments. It was capable of simulating multiple plant phenotypes (flower number, organ biomass, plant height) with visual output. Furthermore, it predicted well the phenotypes of the other eight treatments (validation) through parameter interpolation. • This model could potentially serve to bridge models of different scales, and to link energy input to crop output in glasshouses.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.