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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Ghrelin effects expression of several genes associated with depression-like behavior.
Prog. Neuropsychopharmacol. Biol. Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 07-24-2014
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Ghrelin (Ghr) is an orexigenic peptide that is being investigated for its potential role in development of anxiety-like behavior and modulation of depressive-like symptoms induced by bilateral olfactory bulbectomy (OB) in rodents. Olfactory bulbectomy is an animal model useful to study of depression and Ghr could be an alternative therapeutic tool in depression therapy. We studied the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) Ghr administration on the expression of hypothalamic genes related to depression and mood (delta opioid receptor (DOR), mu opioid receptor (MOR) and kappa opioid receptor (KOR), lutropin-choriogonadotropic hormone receptor (LHCGR), serotonin transporter (SERT), interleukin 1 beta (IL-1b), vasopressin (AVP) and corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH)) in OB animals, as well as changes in plasma levels of AVP, CRH and adenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). We found that acute Ghr 0.3nmol/?l administration increases gene expression of DOR, SERT and LHCGR in OB mice and decreased expression of IL-1b, suggesting that these genes could be involved in the antidepressant-like effects of Ghr. In addition, OB animals exhibit high AVP gene expression and elevated plasma concentrations of AVP and ACTH and acute Ghr 0.3nmol/?l administration reduces AVP gene expression and the concentration of these hormones, suggesting that peptide-effects on depressive-like behavior could be mediated at least in part via AVP. In conclusion, this study provides new evidence about genes, receptors and hormones involved in the antidepressant mechanism/s induced by Ghr in OB animals.
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Involvement of nNOS/NO/sGC/cGMP signaling pathway in cocaine sensitization and in the associated hippocampal alterations: does phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition help to drug vulnerability?
Psychopharmacology (Berl.)
PUBLISHED: 03-20-2013
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Repeated cocaine administration induces behavioral sensitization in about 50 % of treated animals. Nitric oxide could be involved in the acquisition and maintenance of behavioral cocaine effects, probably by activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)/NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling pathway, since inhibition of the nNOS enzyme attenuates development of sensitization in rats. On the other hand, increased cGMP availability by phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors has been correlated to the misuse and recreational use of these agents and also to the concomitant use with illicit drugs in humans. Hippocampus is an important brain region for conditioning to general context previously associated to drug availability, influencing drug-seeking behavior and sensitization. Moreover, cocaine and other drugs of abuse can affect the strength of glutamate synapses in this structure, lastly modifying neuronal activity in main regions of the reward circuitry.
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Ghrelin as a neuroprotective and palliative agent in Alzheimers and Parkinsons disease.
Curr. Pharm. Des.
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2013
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Ghrelin is a gastric hormone that stimulates growth hormone (GH) secretion and food intake to regulate energy homeostasis and body weight by binding to its receptor, GH secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a), which is most highly expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus. Nowadays there is considerable evidence showing that the GHSR1a is also expressed in numerous extra-hypothalamic neuronal populations and the physiological role of ghrelin is by far wider than considered before including learning and memory, anxiety, depression and neuroprotection. The present review attempts to provide a comprehensive picture of the role of ghrelin in the central nervous system and to highlight recent findings showing its potential as an innovative therapeutic agent in neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimers disease and Parkinsons disease.
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The G protein coupled receptor Gpr153 shares common evolutionary origin with Gpr162 and is highly expressed in central regions including the thalamus, cerebellum and the arcuate nucleus.
FEBS J.
PUBLISHED: 10-31-2011
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The Rhodopsin family of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) includes the phylogenetic ?-group consisting of about 100 human members. The ?-group is the only group of GPCRs that has many receptors for biogenic amines which are major drug targets. Several members of this group are orphan receptors and their functions are elusive. In this study we present a detailed phylogenetic and anatomical characterization of the Gpr153 receptor and also attempt to study its functional role. We identified the homologue of Gpr153 in the elephant shark genome and phylogenetic and synteny analyses revealed that Gpr162 and Gpr153 share a common ancestor that split most likely through a duplication event before the divergence of the tetrapods and the teleost lineage. A quantitative real-time PCR study reveals widespread expression of Gpr153 in the central nervous system and all the peripheral tissues investigated. Detailed in?situ hybridization on mouse brain showed specifically high expression in the thalamus, cerebellum and the arcuate nucleus. The antisense oligodeoxynucleotide knockdown of Gpr153 caused a slight reduction in food intake and the elevated plus maze test showed significant reduction in the percentage of time spent in the centre square, which points towards a probable role in decision making. This report provides the first detailed characterization of the evolution, expression and primary functional properties of the Gpr153 gene.
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Ghrelin inhibited serotonin release from hippocampal slices.
Peptides
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2011
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Ghrelin (Ghr) is a peptide produced peripherally and centrally. It participates in the modulation of different biological processes. In our laboratory we have shown that (a) Ghr administration, either intracerebroventricular or directly into the hippocampus enhanced memory consolidation in a step down test in rats (b) the effect of Ghr upon memory decreases in animals pretreated with a serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor, Fluoxetine, suggesting that Ghr effects in the hippocampus could be related to the availability of 5-HT. It has been demonstrated that Ghr inhibits 5-HT release from rat hypothalamic synaptosomes. Taking in mint these evidences, we studied the release of radioactive 5-HT to the superfusion medium from hippocampal slices treated with two doses of Ghr (0.3 and 3 nm/?l). Ghr inhibited significantly the 5-HT release in relation to those superfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) (H = 9.48, df = 2, p ? 0.05). In another set of experiments, Ghr was infused into the CA1 area of hippocampus of the rats immediately after training in the step down test and the 5-HT release from slices was studied 24h after Ghr injection showing that in this condition also the 5-HT release was inhibited (H = 11.72, df = 1, p ? 0.05). In conclusion, results provide additional evidence about the neurobiological bases of Ghr action in hippocampus.
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The intra-hippocampal leucine administration impairs memory consolidation and LTP generation in rats.
Cell. Mol. Neurobiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-08-2010
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Leucine accumulates in fluids and tissues of patients affected by maple syrup urine disease, an inherited metabolic disorder, predominantly characterized by neurological dysfunction. Although, a variable degree of cognition/psychomotor delay/mental retardation is found in a considerable number of individuals affected by this deficiency, the mechanisms underlying the neuropathology of these alterations are still not defined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute intra-hippocampal leucine administration in the step-down test in rats. In addition, the leucine effects on the electrophysiological parameter, long-term potentiation generation, and on the activities of the respiratory chain were also investigated. Male Wistar rats were bilaterally administrated with leucine (80 nmol/hippocampus; 160 nmol/rat) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (controls) into the hippocampus immediately post-training in the behavioral task. Twenty-four hours after training in the step-down test, the latency time was evaluated and afterwards animals were sacrificed for assessing the ex vivo biochemical measurements. Leucine-treated animals showed impairment in memory consolidation and a complete inhibition of long-term potentiation generation at supramaximal stimulation. In addition, a significant increment in complex IV activity was observed in hippocampus from leucine-administered rats. These data strongly indicate that leucine compromise memory consolidation, and that impairment of long-term potentiation generation and unbalance of the respiratory chain may be plausible mechanisms underlying the deleterious leucine effect on cognition.
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Ghrelin induced memory facilitation implicates nitric oxide synthase activation and decrease in the threshold to promote LTP in hippocampal dentate gyrus.
Physiol. Behav.
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2010
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Although the hypothalamus has been long considered the main ghrelin (Ghr) target organ mediating orexigenic effects, recently it has been shown that in-vivo Ghr hippocampus administration improves learning and memory in the inhibitory avoidance paradigm. However, the possible mechanisms underlying this memory facilitation effect have not been clarified. Given that the biochemical memory cascade into the hippocampus involves nitric oxide (NO) synthesis via NO synthase (NOS) activation, we investigated 1) if Ghr administration modulated NOS activity in the hippocampus; and 2) if hippocampal NOS inhibition influenced Ghr-induced memory facilitation, using a behavioral paradigm, biochemical determinations and an electrophysiological model. Our results showed that intra-hippocampal Ghr administration increased the NOS activity in a dose dependent manner, and reduced the threshold for LTP generation in dentate gyrus of rat hippocampus. Moreover, pre-administration of NG-nitro-l-arginine (l-NOArg) in the hippocampus partially prevented the Ghr-induced memory improvement, abolished the increase in NOS activity, and prevented the decreased threshold to generate LTP induced by Ghr. These findings suggest that activation of the NOS/NO pathway in hippocampus participates in the effects of Ghr on memory consolidation and is related with plastic properties of the hippocampal three-synaptic loop.
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Ghrelin and memory: differential effects on acquisition and retrieval.
Peptides
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2010
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In a previous paper we have demonstrated that the orexigenic peptide Ghrelin (Ghr), increases memory retention in rats and mice. In the present work we evaluated the Ghr effect when it was administered previous the training session or previous the test session (24h after training) on the memory performance, using step-down test. The results showed that the intra-hippocampal Ghr administration previous the training session improved the long-term memory in this task, but did not modify the short-term memory. Nevertheless, when the Ghr was administrated previous the test session, no changes were observed in the memory performance. Taking into account these results and other previously published by our group, we could hypothesizes that Ghr may modulate specific molecular intermediates involved in memory acquisition/consolidation but not in the retrieval.
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Sauroine, an alkaloid from Huperzia saururus with activity in wistar rats in electrophysiological and behavioral assays related to memory retention.
J. Nat. Prod.
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2009
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The present study describes the effects of sauroine (1), the main alkaloid obtained from Huperzia saururus, on memory retention and learning. To evaluate this, electrophysiological experiments and behavioral tests (step down) were performed on male Wistar rats. The results showed that 1 improved memory retention in the step-down test, significantly increasing hippocampal plasticity. Thus, 1 seems to be a constituent responsible for the activity claimed in folk medicine for H. saururus in Argentina.
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Central ghrelin increases anxiety in the Open Field test and impairs retention memory in a passive avoidance task in neonatal chicks.
Neurobiol Learn Mem
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2009
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Ghrelin (Grh) is an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor. Although Ghr stimulates feeding in rats, it inhibits feeding in neonatal chicks. However, little is known about other central behavioral effects of Ghr. Therefore, we investigated the Ghr effects, injected intracerebroventricularly, on anxiety and memory retention of neonatal chicks in an Open Field test and in a one-trial passive avoidance task, respectively. In the Open Field test, the administration of Ghr in a dose-dependent manner increased the latency to ambulate but decreased ambulation activity, indicating an anxiogenic effect. Furthermore, chicks trained on a passive avoidance task and injected with a dose of 30pmol of Ghr immediately after training showed an impairment of memory retention. However, there were no significant effects on the number of pecks during the pretraining, training, retention and discrimination. In addition, different doses of Ghr produced an inhibition in food intake at different times after injection. Our results indicate that Ghr induces anxiogenesis in chicks. Moreover, we have shown for the first time that Ghr can decrease memory retention in a non-mammalian species, suggesting that Ghr may play an important role in the processes of memory retention in birds.
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Acute ghrelin administration reverses depressive-like behavior induced by bilateral olfactory bulbectomy in mice.
Peptides
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This study aims to examine the antidepressant-like action of Ghrelin (Ghr), a hormone synthesized predominantly by gastrointestinal endocrine cells and released during periods of negative energy balance, in two behavioral models: tail suspension test (TST), a predictive model of antidepressant activity, and the olfactory bulbectomy (OB), an established animal model of depression. The reduction in the immobility time in the TST was the parameter used to assess antidepressant-like effect of Ghr. The depressive-like behavior in olfactory bulbectomized mice was inferred through the increase in the immobility time in the TST and the hyperlocomotor activity in the open-field test. Ghr produced antidepressant-like effect in TST (0.3 nmol/?l, i.c.v.), and reversed OB-induced depressive-like behavior. In conclusion, these results provide clear evidence that an acute administration of ghrelin produce antidepressant-like effect in the TST and OB.
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Differential effects of fluoxetine and venlafaxine on memory recognition: possible mechanisms of action.
Prog. Neuropsychopharmacol. Biol. Psychiatry
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Serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) are antidepressant drugs commonly used to treat a wide spectrum of mood disorders (Wong and Licinio, 2001). Although they have been clinically used for more than 50 years, the molecular and cellular basis for the action of SSRIs and SNRIs is not clear. Considering that the changes in gene expression involved in the action of antidepressant drugs on memory have not been identified, in this study we investigated the impact of chronic treatment with a SSRI (fluoxetine) and a SNRI (venlafaxine) on the mRNA expression of genes related to memory cascade in the mouse hippocampus, namely, ?-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1), neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (TrKB), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK/ERK) and serotonin transporter (SERT). Animals treated with fluoxetine 10 mg/Kg/day for 28 days showed a significant decrease in the percentage of time spent in the novel object recognition test (p?0.005) and induced MAPK1/ERK2 down-regulation (p=0.005). Our results suggest that the effect on cognition could probably be explained by fluoxetine interference in the MAPK/ERK memory pathway. In contrast, chronic treatment with venlafaxine did not reduce MAPK1/ERK2 expression, suggesting that MAPK1/ERK2 down-regulation is not a common effect of all antidepressant drugs. Further studies are needed to examine the effect of chronic fluoxetine treatment on the ERK-CREB system, and to determine whether there is a causal relationship between the disruption of the ERK-CREB system and the effect of this antidepressant on memory performance.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.