JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
EVpedia: A Community Web Portal for Extracellular Vesicles Research.
Dae-Kyum Kim, Jaewook Lee, Sae Rom Kim, Dong-Sic Choi, Yae Jin Yoon, Ji Hyun Kim, Gyeongyun Go, Dinh Nhung, Kahye Hong, Su Chul Jang, Si-Hyun Kim, Kyong-Su Park, Oh Youn Kim, Hyun Taek Park, Ji Hye Seo, Elena Aikawa, Monika Baj-Krzyworzeka, Bas W M van Balkom, Mattias Belting, Lionel Blanc, Vincent Bond, Antonella Bongiovanni, Francesc E Borràs, Luc Buée, Edit I Buzás, Lesley Cheng, Aled Clayton, Emanuele Cocucci, Charles S Dela Cruz, Dominic M Desiderio, Dolores Di Vizio, Karin Ekström, Juan M Falcon-Perez, Chris Gardiner, Bernd Giebel, David W Greening, Julia Christina Gross, Dwijendra Gupta, An Hendrix, Andrew F Hill, Michelle M Hill, Esther Nolte-'t Hoen, Do Won Hwang, Jameel Inal, Medicharla V Jagannadham, Muthuvel Jayachandran, Young-Koo Jee, Malene Jørgensen, Kwang Pyo Kim, Yoon-Keun Kim, Thomas Kislinger, Cecilia Lässer, Dong Soo Lee, Hakmo Lee, Johannes van Leeuwen, Thomas Lener, Ming-Lin Liu, Jan Lötvall, Antonio Marcilla, Suresh Mathivanan, Andreas Möller, Jess Morhayim, François Mullier, Irina Nazarenko, Rienk Nieuwland, Diana N Nunes, Ken Pang, Jaesung Park, Tushar Patel, Gabriella Pocsfalvi, Hernando Del Portillo, Ulrich Putz, Marcel I Ramirez, Marcio L Rodrigues, Tae-Young Roh, Felix Royo, Susmita Sahoo, Raymond Schiffelers, Shivani Sharma, Pia Siljander, Richard J Simpson, Carolina Soekmadji, Philip Stahl, Allan Stensballe, Ewa Stępień, Hidetoshi Tahara, Arne Trummer, Hadi Valadi, Laura J Vella, Sun Nyunt Wai, Kenneth Witwer, María Yáñez-Mó, Hyewon Youn, Reinhard Zeidler, Yong Song Gho.
Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 11-13-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Extracellular vesicles are spherical bilayered proteolipids, harboring various bioactive molecules. Due to the complexity of the vesicular nomenclatures and components, online searches for extracellular vesicle-related publications and vesicular components are currently challenging.
Related JoVE Video
Exosomes and cardiac repair after myocardial infarction.
Circ. Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Myocardial infarction is a leading cause of death among all cardiovascular diseases. The analysis of molecular mechanisms by which the ischemic myocardium initiates repair and remodeling indicates that secreted soluble factors are key players in communication to local and distant tissues, such as bone marrow. Recently, actively secreted membrane vesicles, including exosomes, are being recognized as new candidates with important roles in intercellular and tissue-level communication. In this review, we critically examine the emerging role of exosomes in local and distant microcommunication mechanisms after myocardial infarction. A comprehensive understanding of the role of exosomes in cardiac repair after myocardial infarction could bridge a major gap in knowledge of the repair mechanism after myocardial injury.
Related JoVE Video
Exosomes from human CD34(+) stem cells mediate their proangiogenic paracrine activity.
Circ. Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-11-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Transplantation of human CD34(+) stem cells to ischemic tissues has been associated with reduced angina, improved exercise time, and reduced amputation rates in phase 2 clinical trials and has been shown to induce neovascularization in preclinical models. Previous studies have suggested that paracrine factors secreted by these proangiogenic cells are responsible, at least in part, for the angiogenic effects induced by CD34(+) cell transplantation.
Related JoVE Video
Induction of autophagy by cystatin C: a mechanism that protects murine primary cortical neurons and neuronal cell lines.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Cystatin C (CysC) expression in the brain is elevated in human patients with epilepsy, in animal models of neurodegenerative conditions, and in response to injury, but whether up-regulated CysC expression is a manifestation of neurodegeneration or a cellular repair response is not understood. This study demonstrates that human CysC is neuroprotective in cultures exposed to cytotoxic challenges, including nutritional-deprivation, colchicine, staurosporine, and oxidative stress. While CysC is a cysteine protease inhibitor, cathepsin B inhibition was not required for the neuroprotective action of CysC. Cells responded to CysC by inducing fully functional autophagy via the mTOR pathway, leading to enhanced proteolytic clearance of autophagy substrates by lysosomes. Neuroprotective effects of CysC were prevented by inhibiting autophagy with beclin 1 siRNA or 3-methyladenine. Our findings show that CysC plays a protective role under conditions of neuronal challenge by inducing autophagy via mTOR inhibition and are consistent with CysC being neuroprotective in neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, modulation of CysC expression has therapeutic implications for stroke, Alzheimers disease, and other neurodegenerative disorders.
Related JoVE Video
Sonic hedgehog-modified human CD34+ cells preserve cardiac function after acute myocardial infarction.
Circ. Res.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Ischemic cardiovascular disease represents one of the largest epidemics currently facing the aging population. Current literature has illustrated the efficacy of autologous, stem cell therapies as novel strategies for treating these disorders. The CD34+ hematopoetic stem cell has shown significant promise in addressing myocardial ischemia by promoting angiogenesis that helps preserve the functionality of ischemic myocardium. Unfortunately, both viability and angiogenic quality of autologous CD34+ cells decline with advanced age and diminished cardiovascular health.
Related JoVE Video
In vitro assays measuring protection by proteins such as cystatin C of primary cortical neuronal and smooth muscle cells.
Methods Mol. Biol.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Neuronal cell culture models have been used to demonstrate the protective effects of cystatin C against a variety of insults, including the toxicity induced by oligomeric and fibrillar amyloid ? (A?). Here, we describe assays quantifying cystatin C protective effects against cytotoxicity induced by nutrient deprivation, oxidative stress, or cytotoxic forms of A?. Three methods for the evaluation of either cell death or cell survival are described: measurement of metabolic activity, cell death, and cell division. The cell culture models used are murine primary cortical neurons and murine primary cerebral smooth muscle cells. The effects of exogenously applied cystatin C are studied by comparing the viability of nonstressed control, stressed control, and cystatin C-treated stressed cells. The effect of endogenous level of cystatin C expression is studied by comparing stressed primary cells isolated from brains of cystatin C transgenic, cystatin C knockout, and wild-type mice.
Related JoVE Video
Murine cerebrovascular cells as a cell culture model for cerebral amyloid angiopathy: isolation of smooth muscle and endothelial cells from mouse brain.
Methods Mol. Biol.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The use of murine cerebrovascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells has not been widely employed as a cell culture model for the investigation of cellular mechanisms involved in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Difficulties in isolation and propagation of murine cerebrovascular cells and insufficient yields for molecular and cell culture studies have deterred investigators from using mice as a source for cerebrovascular cells in culture. Instead, cerebrovascular cells from larger mammals are preferred and several methods describing the isolation of endothelial and smooth muscle cells from human, canine, rat, and guinea pig have been published. In recent years, several transgenic mouse lines showing CAA pathology have been established; consequently murine cerebrovascular cells derived from these animals can serve as a key cellular model to study CAA. Here, we describe a procedure for isolating murine microvessels that yields healthy smooth muscle and endothelial cell populations and produce sufficient material for experimental purposes. Murine smooth muscle cells isolated using this protocol exhibit the classic "hill and valley" morphology and are immunoreactive for the smooth muscle cell marker ?-actin. Endothelial cells display a "cobblestone" pattern phenotype and show the characteristic immunostaining for the von Willebrand factor and the factor VIII-related antigen. In addition, we describe methods designed to preserve these cells by storage in liquid nitrogen and reestablishing viable cell cultures. Finally, we compare our methods with protocols designed to isolate and maintain human cerebrovascular cell cultures.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.