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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Influence of welding fume on systemic iron status.
Ann Occup Hyg
PUBLISHED: 09-15-2014
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Iron is the major metal found in welding fumes, and although it is an essential trace element, its overload causes toxicity due to Fenton reactions. To avoid oxidative damage, excess iron is bound to ferritin, and as a result, serum ferritin (SF) is a recognized biomarker for iron stores, with high concentrations linked to inflammation and potentially also cancer. However, little is known about iron overload in welders. Within this study, we assessed the iron status and quantitative associations between airborne iron, body iron stores, and iron homeostasis in 192 welders not wearing dust masks. Welders were equipped with personal samplers in order to determine the levels of respirable iron in the breathing zone during a working shift. SF, prohepcidin and other markers of iron status were determined in blood samples collected after shift. The impact of iron exposure and other factors on SF and prohepcidin were estimated using multiple regression models. Our results indicate that respirable iron is a significant predictor of SF and prohepcidin. Concentrations of SF varied according to the welding technique and respiratory protection used, with a median of 103 ?g l-1 in tungsten inert gas welders, 125 ?g l-1 in those wearing air-purifying respirators, and 161 ?g l-1 in other welders. Compared to welders with low iron stores (SF < 25 ?g l-1), those with excess body iron (SF ? 400 ?g l-1) worked under a higher median concentration of airborne iron (60 ?g m(-3) versus 148 ?g m(-3)). Even though air concentrations of respirable iron and manganese were highly correlated, and low iron stores have been reported to increase manganese uptake in the gastrointestinal tract, no correlation was seen between SF and manganese in blood. In conclusion, monitoring SF may be a reasonable method for health surveillance of welders. Respiratory protection with air-purifying respirators can decrease iron exposure and avoid chronically higher SF in welders working with high-emission technologies.
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Oxidatively damaged guanosine in white blood cells and in urine of welders: associations with exposure to welding fumes and body iron stores.
Arch. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 08-09-2014
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The International Agency for Research on Cancer considers the carcinogenicity of welding fume of priority for re-evaluation. Genotoxic effects in experimental animals are still inconclusive. Here, we investigated the association of personal exposure to metals in respirable welding fumes during a working shift with oxidatively damaged guanosine in DNA of white blood cells (WBC) and in postshift urine samples from 238 welders. Medians of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) were 2.35/10(6) dGuo in DNA of WBC and 4.33 µg/g creatinine in urine. The median of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo) was 7.03 µg/g creatinine in urine. The extent of both urinary parameters was higher in welders applying techniques with high particle emission rates to stainless steel than in tungsten inert gas welders (8-oxodGuo: 9.96 vs. 4.49 µg/L, 8-oxoGuo: 15.7 vs. 7.7 µg/L), but this apparent difference diminished after creatinine adjustment. We applied random intercept models to estimate the influence of airborne and systemic exposure to metals on oxidatively damaged guanosine in WBC and urine together with covariates. We observed a highly significant nonlinear association of urinary 8-oxoGuo with serum ferritin (P < 0.0001) and higher 8-oxoGuo concentrations for respirable iron >1,000 µg/m(3) compared to ?57 µg/m(3). Similar effects were found for manganese. Airborne chromium but not nickel was associated with all oxidatively modified guanosine measures, whereas urinary chromium as well as nickel showed associations with urinary modified guanosines. In summary, oxidatively damaged urinary guanosine was associated with airborne and systemic exposure to metals in welders and showed a strong relation to body iron stores.
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0146?Exposure to respirable welding fume and iron status in German welders.
Occup Environ Med
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2014
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Siderosis due to excessive iron exposure is a rare disease in welders. Less is known about the effect of inhaled iron on systemic iron status in welders. Here we present the association between exposure to iron as major constituent of the welding fume and the iron status in German welders.
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Air pollution and subclinical airway inflammation in the SALIA cohort study.
Immun Ageing
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2014
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The association between long-term exposure to air pollution and local inflammation in the lung has rarely been investigated in the general population of elderly subjects before. We investigated this association in a population-based cohort of elderly women from Germany.
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Highly immunoreactive IgG antibodies directed against a set of twenty human proteins in the sera of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis identified by protein array.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the most common adult-onset motor neuron disorder, is characterized by the progressive and selective loss of upper and lower motor neurons. Diagnosis of this disorder is based on clinical assessment, and the average survival time is less than 3 years. Injections of IgG from ALS patients into mice are known to specifically mark motor neurons. Moreover, IgG has been found in upper and lower motor neurons in ALS patients. These results led us to perform a case-control study using human protein microarrays to identify the antibody profiles of serum samples from 20 ALS patients and 20 healthy controls. We demonstrated high levels of 20 IgG antibodies that distinguished the patients from the controls. These findings suggest that a panel of antibodies may serve as a potential diagnostic biomarker for ALS.
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N-acetyltransferase 2 phenotype, occupation, and bladder cancer risk: results from the EPIC cohort.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 10-03-2013
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An association between N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) slow acetylation and bladder cancer has been consistently observed in epidemiologic studies. However, evidence has been mainly derived from case-control studies and was sparse from cohort studies. We evaluated the association between NAT2 slow acetylation and bladder cancer in a case-control study nested in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.
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Evaluation of long noncoding RNA MALAT1 as a candidate blood-based biomarker for the diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer.
BMC Res Notes
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2013
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The long noncoding RNA MALAT1 (metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1) is described as a potential biomarker for NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer). Diagnostic biomarkers need to be detectable in easily accessible body fluids, should be characterized by high specificity, sufficient sensitivity, and robustness against influencing factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of MALAT1 as a blood based biomarker for NSCLC.
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Improving the default data analysis workflow for large autoimmune biomarker discovery studies with ProtoArrays.
Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2013
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Contemporary protein microarrays such as the ProtoArray® are used for autoimmune antibody screening studies to discover biomarker panels. For ProtoArray data analysis, the software Prospector and a default workflow are suggested by the manufacturer. While analyzing a large data set of a discovery study for diagnostic biomarkers of the Parkinsons disease (ParkCHIP), we have revealed the need for distinct improvements of the suggested workflow concerning raw data acquisition, normalization and preselection method availability, batch effects, feature selection, and feature validation. In this work, appropriate improvements of the default workflow are proposed. It is shown that completely automatic data acquisition as a batch, a re-implementation of Prospectors pre-selection method, multivariate or hybrid feature selection, and validation of the selected protein panel using an independent test set define in combination an improved workflow for large studies.
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Detection of patient subgroups with differential expression in omics data: a comprehensive comparison of univariate measures.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Detection of yet unknown subgroups showing differential gene or protein expression is a frequent goal in the analysis of modern molecular data. Applications range from cancer biology over developmental biology to toxicology. Often a control and an experimental group are compared, and subgroups can be characterized by differential expression for only a subgroup-specific set of genes or proteins. Finding such genes and corresponding patient subgroups can help in understanding pathological pathways, diagnosis and defining drug targets. The size of the subgroup and the type of differential expression determine the optimal strategy for subgroup identification. To date, commonly used software packages hardly provide statistical tests and methods for the detection of such subgroups. Different univariate methods for subgroup detection are characterized and compared, both on simulated and on real data. We present an advanced design for simulation studies: Data is simulated under different distributional assumptions for the expression of the subgroup, and performance results are compared against theoretical upper bounds. For each distribution, different degrees of deviation from the majority of observations are considered for the subgroup. We evaluate classical approaches as well as various new suggestions in the context of omics data, including outlier sum, PADGE, and kurtosis. We also propose the new FisherSum score. ROC curve analysis and AUC values are used to quantify the ability of the methods to distinguish between genes or proteins with and without certain subgroup patterns. In general, FisherSum for small subgroups and [Formula: see text]-test for large subgroups achieve best results. We apply each method to a case-control study on Parkinsons disease and underline the biological benefit of the new method.
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Diagnostic value of the impairment of olfaction in Parkinsons disease.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Olfactory impairment is increasingly recognized as an early symptom in the development of Parkinsons disease. Testing olfactory function is a non-invasive method but can be time-consuming which restricts its application in clinical settings and epidemiological studies. Here, we investigate odor identification as a supportive diagnostic tool for Parkinsons disease and estimate the performance of odor subsets to allow a more rapid testing of olfactory impairment.
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Assessment of mRNA and microRNA Stabilization in Peripheral Human Blood for Multicenter Studies and Biobanks.
Biomark Insights
PUBLISHED: 09-22-2010
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In this study we evaluate the suitability of two methods of RNA conservation in blood samples, PAXgene and RNAlater, in combination with variable shipping conditions for their application in multicenter studies and biobanking. RNA yield, integrity, and purity as well as levels of selected mRNA and microRNA species were analyzed in peripheral human blood samples stabilized by PAXgene or RNAlater and shipped on dry ice or at ambient temperatures from the study centers to the central analysis laboratory. Both examined systems were clearly appropriate for RNA stabilization in human blood independently of the shipping conditions. The isolated RNA is characterized by good quantity and quality and well suited for downstream applications like quantitative RT-PCR analysis of mRNA and microRNA. Superior yield and integrity values were received using RNAlater. It would be reasonable to consider the production and approval of blood collection tubes prefilled with RNAlater to facilitate the use of this excellent RNA stabilization system in large studies.
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NOTCH1, HIF1A and other cancer-related proteins in lung tissue from uranium miners--variation by occupational exposure and subtype of lung cancer.
PLoS ONE
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Radon and arsenic are established pulmonary carcinogens. We investigated the association of cumulative exposure to these carcinogens with NOTCH1, HIF1A and other cancer-specific proteins in lung tissue from uranium miners.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.