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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
HAMAP in 2015: updates to the protein family classification and annotation system.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-29-2014
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HAMAP (High-quality Automated and Manual Annotation of Proteins-available at http://hamap.expasy.org/) is a system for the automatic classification and annotation of protein sequences. HAMAP provides annotation of the same quality and detail as UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, using manually curated profiles for protein sequence family classification and expert curated rules for functional annotation of family members. HAMAP data and tools are made available through our website and as part of the UniRule pipeline of UniProt, providing annotation for millions of unreviewed sequences of UniProtKB/TrEMBL. Here we report on the growth of HAMAP and updates to the HAMAP system since our last report in the NAR Database Issue of 2013. We continue to augment HAMAP with new family profiles and annotation rules as new protein families are characterized and annotated in UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot; the latest version of HAMAP (as of 3 September 2014) contains 1983 family classification profiles and 1998 annotation rules (up from 1780 and 1720). We demonstrate how the complex logic of HAMAP rules allows for precise annotation of individual functional variants within large homologous protein families. We also describe improvements to our web-based tool HAMAP-Scan which simplify the classification and annotation of sequences, and the incorporation of an improved sequence-profile search algorithm.
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Genetic variations and diseases in UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot: the ins and outs of expert manual curation.
Hum. Mutat.
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2014
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During the last few years, next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have accelerated the detection of genetic variants resulting in the rapid discovery of new disease-associated genes. However, the wealth of variation data made available by NGS alone is not sufficient to understand the mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis and manifestation. Multidisciplinary approaches combining sequence and clinical data with prior biological knowledge are needed to unravel the role of genetic variants in human health and disease. In this context, it is crucial that these data are linked, organized, and made readily available through reliable online resources. The Swiss-Prot section of the Universal Protein Knowledgebase (UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot) provides the scientific community with a collection of information on protein functions, interactions, biological pathways, as well as human genetic diseases and variants, all manually reviewed by experts. In this article, we present an overview of the information content of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot to show how this knowledgebase can support researchers in the elucidation of the mechanisms leading from a molecular defect to a disease phenotype.
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An integrated ontology resource to explore and study host-virus relationships.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Our growing knowledge of viruses reveals how these pathogens manage to evade innate host defenses. A global scheme emerges in which many viruses usurp key cellular defense mechanisms and often inhibit the same components of antiviral signaling. To accurately describe these processes, we have generated a comprehensive dictionary for eukaryotic host-virus interactions. This controlled vocabulary has been detailed in 57 ViralZone resource web pages which contain a global description of all molecular processes. In order to annotate viral gene products with this vocabulary, an ontology has been built in a hierarchy of UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB) keyword terms and corresponding Gene Ontology (GO) terms have been developed in parallel. The results are 65 UniProtKB keywords related to 57 GO terms, which have been used in 14,390 manual annotations; 908,723 automatic annotations and propagated to an estimation of 922,941 GO annotations. ViralZone pages, UniProtKB keywords and GO terms provide complementary tools to users, and the three resources have been linked to each other through host-virus vocabulary.
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Expert curation in UniProtKB: a case study on dealing with conflicting and erroneous data.
Database (Oxford)
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot provides expert curation with information extracted from literature and curator-evaluated computational analysis. As knowledgebases continue to play an increasingly important role in scientific research, a number of studies have evaluated their accuracy and revealed various errors. While some are curation errors, others are the result of incorrect information published in the scientific literature. By taking the example of sirtuin-5, a complex annotation case, we will describe the curation procedure of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and detail how we report conflicting information in the database. We will demonstrate the importance of collaboration between resources to ensure curation consistency and the value of contributions from the user community in helping maintain error-free resources. Database URL: www.uniprot.org.
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The UniProt-GO Annotation database in 2011.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 11-28-2011
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The GO annotation dataset provided by the UniProt Consortium (GOA: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/GOA) is a comprehensive set of evidenced-based associations between terms from the Gene Ontology resource and UniProtKB proteins. Currently supplying over 100 million annotations to 11 million proteins in more than 360,000 taxa, this resource has increased 2-fold over the last 2 years and has benefited from a wealth of checks to improve annotation correctness and consistency as well as now supplying a greater information content enabled by GO Consortium annotation format developments. Detailed, manual GO annotations obtained from the curation of peer-reviewed papers are directly contributed by all UniProt curators and supplemented with manual and electronic annotations from 36 model organism and domain-focused scientific resources. The inclusion of high-quality, automatic annotation predictions ensures the UniProt GO annotation dataset supplies functional information to a wide range of proteins, including those from poorly characterized, non-model organism species. UniProt GO annotations are freely available in a range of formats accessible by both file downloads and web-based views. In addition, the introduction of a new, normalized file format in 2010 has made for easier handling of the complete UniProt-GOA data set.
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UniProtKB amid the turmoil of plant proteomics research.
Front Plant Sci
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The UniProt KnowledgeBase (UniProtKB) provides a single, centralized, authoritative resource for protein sequences and functional information. The majority of its records is based on automatic translation of coding sequences (CDS) provided by submitters at the time of initial deposition to the nucleotide sequence databases (INSDC). This article will give a general overview of the current situation, with some specific illustrations extracted from our annotation of Arabidopsis and rice proteomes. More and more frequently, only the raw sequence of a complete genome is deposited to the nucleotide sequence databases and the gene model predictions and annotations are kept in separate, specialized model organism databases (MODs). In order to be able to provide the complete proteome of model organisms, UniProtKB had to implement pipelines for import of protein sequences from Ensembl and EnsemblGenomes. A single genome can be the target of several unrelated sequencing projects and the final assembly and gene model predictions may diverge quite significantly. In addition, several cultivars of the same species are often sequenced - 1001 Arabidopsis cultivars are currently under way - and the resulting proteomes are far from being identical. Therefore, one challenge for UniProtKB is to store and organize these data in a convenient way and to clearly defined reference proteomes that should be made available to users. Manual annotation is one of the landmarks of the Swiss-Prot section of UniProtKB. Besides adding functional annotation, curators are checking, and often correcting, gene model predictions. For plants, this task is limited to Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa subsp. japonica. Proteomics data providing experimental evidences confirming the existence of proteins or identifying sequence features such as post-translational modifications are also imported into UniProtKB records and the knowledgebase is cross-referenced to numerous proteomics resource.
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HAMAP in 2013, new developments in the protein family classification and annotation system.
Nucleic Acids Res.
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HAMAP (High-quality Automated and Manual Annotation of Proteins-available at http://hamap.expasy.org/) is a system for the classification and annotation of protein sequences. It consists of a collection of manually curated family profiles for protein classification, and associated annotation rules that specify annotations that apply to family members. HAMAP was originally developed to support the manual curation of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot records describing microbial proteins. Here we describe new developments in HAMAP, including the extension of HAMAP to eukaryotic proteins, the use of HAMAP in the automated annotation of UniProtKB/TrEMBL, providing high-quality annotation for millions of protein sequences, and the future integration of HAMAP into a unified system for UniProtKB annotation, UniRule. HAMAP is continuously updated by expert curators with new family profiles and annotation rules as new protein families are characterized. The collection of HAMAP family classification profiles and annotation rules can be browsed and viewed on the HAMAP website, which also provides an interface to scan user sequences against HAMAP profiles.
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The UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot Tox-Prot program: A central hub of integrated venom protein data.
Toxicon
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Animal toxins are of interest to a wide range of scientists, due to their numerous applications in pharmacology, neurology, hematology, medicine, and drug research. This, and to a lesser extent the development of new performing tools in transcriptomics and proteomics, has led to an increase in toxin discovery. In this context, providing publicly available data on animal toxins has become essential. The UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot Tox-Prot program (http://www.uniprot.org/program/Toxins) plays a crucial role by providing such an access to venom protein sequences and functions from all venomous species. This program has up to now curated more than 5000 venom proteins to the high-quality standards of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot (release 2012_02). Proteins targeted by these toxins are also available in the knowledgebase. This paper describes in details the type of information provided by UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot for toxins, as well as the structured format of the knowledgebase.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.