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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Monocytic cell differentiation from band-stage neutrophils under inflammatory conditions via MKK6 activation.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 09-11-2014
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During inflammation, neutrophils are rapidly mobilized from the bone marrow storage pool into peripheral blood (PB) to enter lesional sites, where most rapidly undergo apoptosis. Monocytes constitute a second wave of inflammatory immigrates, giving rise to long-lived macrophages and dendritic cell subsets. According to descriptive immunophenotypic and cell culture studies, neutrophils may directly "transdifferentiate" into monocytes/macrophages. We provide mechanistic data in human and murine models supporting the existence of this cellular pathway. First, the inflammatory signal-induced MKK6-p38MAPK cascade activates a monocyte differentiation program in human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-dependent neutrophils. Second, adoptively transferred neutrophils isolated from G-CSF-pretreated mice rapidly acquired monocyte characteristics in response to inflammatory signals in vivo. Consistently, inflammatory signals led to the recruitment of osteoclast progenitor cell potential from ex vivo-isolated G-CSF-mobilized human blood neutrophils. Monocytic cell differentiation potential was retained in left-shifted band-stage neutrophils but lost in neutrophils from steady-state PB. MKK6-p38MAPK signaling in HL60 model cells led to diminishment of the transcription factor C/EBP?, which enabled the induction of a monocytic cell differentiation program. Gene profiling confirmed lineage conversion from band-stage neutrophils to monocytic cells. Therefore, inflammatory signals relayed by the MKK6-p38MAPK cascade induce monocytic cell differentiation from band-stage neutrophils.
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The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 inhibits complement component 1q effector mechanisms and exerts detrimental effects during pneumococcal pneumonia.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2014
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Phagocytosis and inflammation within the lungs is crucial for host defense during bacterial pneumonia. Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-2 was proposed to negatively regulate TLR-mediated responses and enhance phagocytosis by macrophages, but the role of TREM-2 in respiratory tract infections is unknown. Here, we established the presence of TREM-2 on alveolar macrophages (AM) and explored the function of TREM-2 in the innate immune response to pneumococcal infection in vivo. Unexpectedly, we found Trem-2-/- AM to display augmented bacterial phagocytosis in vitro and in vivo compared to WT AM. Mechanistically, we detected that in the absence of TREM-2, pulmonary macrophages selectively produced elevated complement component 1q (C1q) levels. We found that these increased C1q levels depended on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR-?) activity and were responsible for the enhanced phagocytosis of bacteria. Upon infection with S. pneumoniae, Trem-2-/- mice exhibited an augmented bacterial clearance from lungs, decreased bacteremia and improved survival compared to their WT counterparts. This work is the first to disclose a role for TREM-2 in clinically relevant respiratory tract infections and demonstrates a previously unknown link between TREM-2 and opsonin production within the lungs.
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Heme oxygenase-1 drives metaflammation and insulin resistance in mouse and man.
Cell
PUBLISHED: 03-03-2014
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Obesity and diabetes affect more than half a billion individuals worldwide. Interestingly, the two conditions do not always coincide and the molecular determinants of "healthy" versus "unhealthy" obesity remain ill-defined. Chronic metabolic inflammation (metaflammation) is believed to be pivotal. Here, we tested a hypothesized anti-inflammatory role for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the development of metabolic disease. Surprisingly, in matched biopsies from "healthy" versus insulin-resistant obese subjects we find HO-1 to be among the strongest positive predictors of metabolic disease in humans. We find that hepatocyte and macrophage conditional HO-1 deletion in mice evokes resistance to diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammation, dramatically reducing secondary disease such as steatosis and liver toxicity. Intriguingly, cellular assays show that HO-1 defines prestimulation thresholds for inflammatory skewing and NF-?B amplification in macrophages and for insulin signaling in hepatocytes. These findings identify HO-1 inhibition as a potential therapeutic strategy for metabolic disease.
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WAVE1 mediates suppression of phagocytosis by phospholipid-derived DAMPs.
J. Clin. Invest.
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2013
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Clearance of invading pathogens is essential to preventing overwhelming inflammation and sepsis that are symptomatic of bacterial peritonitis. Macrophages participate in this innate immune response by engulfing and digesting pathogens, a process called phagocytosis. Oxidized phospholipids (OxPL) are danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) generated in response to infection that can prevent the phagocytic clearance of bacteria. We investigated the mechanism underlying OxPL action in macrophages. Exposure to OxPL induced alterations in actin polymerization, resulting in spreading of peritoneal macrophages and diminished uptake of E. coli. Pharmacological and cell-based studies showed that an anchored pool of PKA mediates the effects of OxPL. Gene silencing approaches identified the A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) WAVE1 as an effector of OxPL action in vitro. Chimeric Wave1(-/-) mice survived significantly longer after infection with E. coli and OxPL treatment in vivo. Moreover, we found that endogenously generated OxPL in human peritoneal dialysis fluid from end-stage renal failure patients inhibited phagocytosis via WAVE1. Collectively, these data uncover an unanticipated role for WAVE1 as a critical modulator of the innate immune response to severe bacterial infections.
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Lipocalin 2 deactivates macrophages and worsens pneumococcal pneumonia outcomes.
J. Clin. Invest.
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2013
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Macrophages play a key role in responding to pathogens and initiate an inflammatory response to combat microbe multiplication. Deactivation of macrophages facilitates resolution of the inflammatory response. Deactivated macrophages are characterized by an immunosuppressive phenotype, but the lack of unique markers that can reliably identify these cells explains the poorly defined biological role of this macrophage subset. We identified lipocalin 2 (LCN2) as both a marker of deactivated macrophages and a macrophage deactivator. We show that LCN2 attenuated the early inflammatory response and impaired bacterial clearance, leading to impaired survival of mice suffering from pneumococcal pneumonia. LCN2 induced IL-10 formation by macrophages, skewing macrophage polarization in a STAT3-dependent manner. Pulmonary LCN2 levels were tremendously elevated during bacterial pneumonia in humans, and high LCN2 levels were indicative of a detrimental outcome from pneumonia with Gram-positive bacteria. Our data emphasize the importance of macrophage deactivation for the outcome of pneumococcal infections and highlight the role of LCN2 and IL-10 as determinants of macrophage performance in the respiratory tract.
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The scavenger receptor CD36 downmodulates the early inflammatory response while enhancing bacterial phagocytosis during pneumococcal pneumonia.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 04-22-2013
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CD36 is a scavenger receptor that exhibits pleiotropic functions, including adhesion to thrombospondin, inhibition of angiogenesis, transport of long-chain fatty acids, and clearance of apoptotic cells. In addition, it has been implicated in the host immune response because it acts as a coreceptor for TLR2 and plays a role in Staphylococcus aureus infection. However, its role in other Gram-positive bacterial infections is unclear. In this study, using mice deficient in CD36, we sought to examine the role of CD36 in pneumococcal pneumonia, a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. We show that CD36 is expressed on both alveolar macrophages and respiratory epithelial cells. Early in infection, CD36(-/-) mice have an exaggerated inflammatory response compared with wild-type littermate controls. In vitro studies using CD36(-/-) primary cells confirm the enhanced early inflammation in response to S. pneumoniae and its lipoteichoic acid, demonstrate that S. pneumoniae binds to cells via its phosphocholine residues, and suggest a role for CD36 in reducing inflammation induced by the phosphocholine residues of pneumococcal lipoteichoic acid. Later in infection, although CD36(-/-) mice exhibit impaired bacterial clearance, owing to a decreased capacity of CD36(-/-) macrophages to phagocytose S. pneumoniae, minor effects on mortality occur, in comparison with those in wild-type littermate control mice. These data show that CD36 contributes to the pulmonary host response during S. pneumoniae infection by virtue of its ability to act as a phagocytic receptor and as a modulator of the early innate immune response.
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A reversible gene trap collection empowers haploid genetics in human cells.
Nat. Methods
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2013
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Knockout collections are invaluable tools for studying model organisms such as yeast. However, there are no large-scale knockout collections of human cells. Using gene-trap mutagenesis in near-haploid human cells, we established a platform to generate and isolate individual gene-trapped cells and used it to prepare a collection of human cell lines carrying single gene-trap insertions. In most cases, the insertion can be reversed. This growing library covers 3,396 genes, one-third of the expressed genome, is DNA-barcoded and allows systematic screens for a wide variety of cellular phenotypes. We examined cellular responses to TNF-?, TGF-?, IFN-? and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), to illustrate the value of this unique collection of isogenic human cell lines.
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Type I interferon production induced by Streptococcus pyogenes-derived nucleic acids is required for host protection.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 04-18-2011
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Streptococcus pyogenes is a Gram-positive human pathogen that is recognized by yet unknown pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Engagement of these receptor molecules during infection with S. pyogenes, a largely extracellular bacterium with limited capacity for intracellular survival, causes innate immune cells to produce inflammatory mediators such as TNF, but also type I interferon (IFN). Here we show that signaling elicited by type I IFNs is required for successful defense of mice against lethal subcutaneous cellulitis caused by S. pyogenes. Type I IFN signaling was accompanied with reduced neutrophil recruitment to the site of infection. Mechanistic analysis revealed that macrophages and conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) employ different signaling pathways leading to IFN-beta production. Macrophages required IRF3, STING, TBK1 and partially MyD88, whereas in cDCs the IFN-beta production was fully dependent on IRF5 and MyD88. Furthermore, IFN-beta production by macrophages was dependent on the endosomal delivery of streptococcal DNA, while in cDCs streptococcal RNA was identified as the IFN-beta inducer. Despite a role of MyD88 in both cell types, the known IFN-inducing TLRs were individually not required for generation of the IFN-beta response. These results demonstrate that the innate immune system employs several strategies to efficiently recognize S. pyogenes, a pathogenic bacterium that succeeded in avoiding recognition by the standard arsenal of TLRs.
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TLR 2 and CD14 mediate innate immunity and lung inflammation to staphylococcal Panton-Valentine leukocidin in vivo.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 12-22-2010
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The pore-forming toxin Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is carried by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and associated with necrotizing pneumonia together with poor prognosis of infected patients. Although the cell-death-inducing properties of PVL have previously been examined, the pulmonary immune response to PVL is largely unknown. Using an unbiased transcriptional profiling approach, we show that PVL induces only 29 genes in mouse alveolar macrophages, which are associated with TLR signaling. Further studies indicate that PVL directly binds to TLR2 and induces immune responses via NF-?B in a TLR2, CD14, MyD88, IL-1R-associated kinase 1, and TNFR-associated factor 6-dependent manner. PVL-mediated inflammation is independent of pore formation but strongly depends on the LukS subunit and is suppressed in CD14/TLR2(-/-) cells. In vivo PVL or LukS induced a robust inflammatory response in lungs, which was diminished in CD14/TLR2(-/-) mice. These results highlight the proinflammatory properties of PVL and identify CD14/TLR2 as an essential receptor complex for PVL-induced lung inflammation.
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CD14 is a coreceptor of Toll-like receptors 7 and 9.
J. Exp. Med.
PUBLISHED: 11-15-2010
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Recognition of pathogens by the innate immune system requires proteins that detect conserved molecular patterns. Nucleic acids are recognized by cytoplasmic sensors as well as by endosomal Toll-like receptors (TLRs). It has become evident that TLRs require additional proteins to be activated by their respective ligands. In this study, we show that CD14 (cluster of differentiation 14) constitutively interacts with the MyD88-dependent TLR7 and TLR9. CD14 was necessary for TLR7- and TLR9-dependent induction of proinflammatory cytokines in vitro and for TLR9-dependent innate immune responses in mice. CD14 associated with TLR9 stimulatory DNA in precipitation experiments and confocal imaging. The absence of CD14 led to reduced nucleic acid uptake in macrophages. Additionally, CD14 played a role in the stimulation of TLRs by viruses. Using various types of vesicular stomatitis virus, we showed that CD14 is dispensable for viral uptake but is required for the triggering of TLR-dependent cytokine responses. These data show that CD14 has a dual role in nucleic acid-mediated TLR activation: it promotes the selective uptake of nucleic acids, and it acts as a coreceptor for endosomal TLR activation.
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Anti-inflammatory properties of the PI3K pathway are mediated by IL-10/DUSP regulation.
J. Leukoc. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2010
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Resolution of inflammation is an important hallmark in the course of infectious diseases. Dysregulated inflammatory responses may have detrimental consequences for the affected organism. Therefore, tight regulation of inflammation is indispensable. Among numerous modulatory signaling pathways, the PI3K/PTEN signaling pathway has been proposed recently to be involved in the regulation of innate immune reactions. Here, we attempted to elucidate molecular mechanisms that contribute to the modulatory properties of the PI3K signaling pathway in inflammation. PTEN-deficient macrophages, which harbor constitutively active PI3Ks, were analyzed in response to gram-negative bacteria and PAMPs such as LPS. PTEN-deficient cells showed reduced inflammatory cytokine production, which was accompanied by reduced MAPK signaling activation in early- as well as late-phase activation. Simultaneously, we found increased levels of the MKP DUSP1, as well as the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Our data suggest that differential DUSP1 regulation coupled with enhanced IL-10 production contributes to the anti-inflammatory properties of the PI3K pathway.
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The protein tyrosine kinase Tec regulates a CD44highCD62L- Th17 subset.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 09-24-2010
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The generation of Th17 cells has to be tightly controlled during an immune response. In this study, we report an increase in a CD44(high)CD62L(-) Th17 subset in mice deficient for the protein tyrosine kinase Tec. CD44(high)CD62L(-) Tec(-/-) CD4(+) T cells produced enhanced IL-17 upon activation, showed increased expression levels of IL-23R and ROR?t, and IL-23-mediated expansion of Tec(-/-) CD4(+) T cells led to an increased production of IL-17. Tec(-/-) mice immunized with heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae displayed increased IL-17 expression levels in the lung postinfection with S. pneumoniae, and this correlated with enhanced pneumococcal clearance and reduced lung inflammation compared with Tec(+/+) mice. Moreover, naive Tec(-/-) OT-II CD4(+) T cells produced higher levels of IL-17 when cultured with OVA peptide-loaded bone marrow-derived dendritic cells that have been previously activated with heat-killed S. pneumoniae. Taken together, our data indicated a critical role for Tec in T cell-intrinsic signaling pathways that regulate the in vivo generation of CD44(high)CD62L(-) effector/memory Th17 populations.
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Internalization and coreceptor expression are critical for TLR2-mediated recognition of lipoteichoic acid in human peripheral blood.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 08-16-2010
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Lipoteichoic acid (LTA), a ubiquitous cell wall component of Gram-positive bacteria, represents a potent immunostimulatory molecule. Because LTA of a mutant Staphylococcus aureus strain lacking lipoproteins (Deltalgt-LTA) has been described to be immunobiologically inactive despite a lack of ascertained structural differences to wild-type LTA (wt-LTA), we investigated the functional requirements for the recognition of Deltalgt-LTA by human peripheral blood cells. In this study, we demonstrate that Deltalgt-LTA-induced immune activation critically depends on the immobilization of LTA and the presence of human serum components, which, to a lesser degree, was also observed for wt-LTA. Under experimental conditions allowing LTA-mediated stimulation, we found no differences between the immunostimulatory capacity of Deltalgt-LTA and wt-LTA in human blood cells, arguing for a limited contribution of possible lipoprotein contaminants to wt-LTA-mediated immune activation. In contrast to human blood cells, TLR2-transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells could be activated only by wt-LTA, whereas activation of these cells by Deltalgt-LTA required the additional expression of TLR6 and CD14, suggesting that activation of human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing solely TLR2 is probably mediated by residual lipoproteins in wt-LTA. Notably, in human peripheral blood, LTA-specific IgG Abs are essential for Deltalgt-LTA-mediated immune activation and appear to induce the phagocytic uptake of Deltalgt-LTA via engagement of FcgammaRII. In this study, we have elucidated a novel mechanism of LTA-induced cytokine induction in human peripheral blood cells that involves uptake of LTA and subsequent intracellular recognition driven by TLR2, TLR6, and CD14.
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Tyrosine kinase 2 controls IL-1ß production at the translational level.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 08-16-2010
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IL-1beta is an important proinflammatory cytokine with a major role in several inflammatory diseases. Expression of IL-1beta is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, mRNA stability, and proteolytic processing. In this study, we report that IL-1beta expression in response to LPS is also regulated at the translational level. LPS-induced IL-1beta protein levels in macrophages derived from murine bone marrow are markedly increased in the absence of tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2). Increased IL-1beta is found intra- and extracellularly, irrespective of the efficiency of IL-1beta processing. We show that the absence of Tyk2 results both in higher translational rates and in enhanced association of IL-1beta mRNA with polysomes. Induction and stability of IL-1beta mRNA are not affected by the lack of Tyk2. We show further that the Tyk2-dependent translational inhibition is mediated by autocrine/paracrine type I IFN signaling and requires signal transducer and activator of transcription 1. Enhanced IL-1beta production in Tyk2- and IFN receptor 1-deficient macrophages is also observed following Listeria monocytogenes infection. Taken together, the data describe a novel mechanism for the control of IL-1beta synthesis.
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Myeloid PTEN promotes inflammation but impairs bactericidal activities during murine pneumococcal pneumonia.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2010
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Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase has been described as an essential signaling component involved in the chemotactic cell influx that is required to eliminate pathogens. At the same time, PI3K was reported to modulate the immune response, thus limiting the magnitude of acute inflammation. The precise role of the PI3K pathway and its endogenous antagonist phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) during clinically relevant bacterial infections is still poorly understood. Utilizing mice lacking myeloid cell-specific PTEN, we studied the impact of PTEN on the immune response to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Survival analysis disclosed that PTEN-deficient mice displayed less severe signs of disease and prolonged survival. The inflammatory response to S. pneumoniae was greatly reduced in macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Unexpectedly, neutrophil influx to the lungs was significantly impaired in animals lacking myeloid-cell PTEN, whereas the additional observation of improved phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages lacking PTEN ultimately resulted in unaltered lung CFUs following bacterial infection. Together, the absence of myeloid cell-associated PTEN and consecutively enhanced PI3K activity dampened pulmonary inflammation, reduced neutrophil influx, and augmented phagocytic properties of macrophages, which ultimately resulted in decreased tissue injury and improved survival during murine pneumococcal pneumonia.
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Update on the role of Toll-like receptors during bacterial infections and sepsis.
Wien Med Wochenschr
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2010
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Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are recognition molecules that importantly contribute to the innate immune response to bacterial and viral infections. Once TLRs sense the presence of invading pathogens a signal transduction cascade is initiated that eventually leads to the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and attraction of neutrophils to the site of infection. While the ultimate goal of this defense pathway is the successful elimination of invading microbes, prolonged or exaggerated stimulation of TLR-associated events can lead to systemic inflammation and clinical symptoms of sepsis. This brief review summarizes the impact of selected TLRs in the host response to clinically important bacteria and provides insights into TLR-associated therapeutic approaches during sepsis and inflammation.
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Bbeta(15-42) protects against acid-induced acute lung injury and secondary pseudomonas pneumonia in vivo.
Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med.
PUBLISHED: 09-17-2009
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Acute lung injury (ALI) is a serious condition in critically ill patients that predisposes to secondary bacterial pneumonia. Vascular leak is a hallmark in the pathogenesis of ALI. The fibrin-derived peptide Bbeta(15-42) was shown to preserve endothelial barriers, thereby reducing vascular leak. The potential therapeutic role of Bbeta(15-42) in ALI has not been addressed so far.
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TREM-1 activation alters the dynamics of pulmonary IRAK-M expression in vivo and improves host defense during pneumococcal pneumonia.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 07-13-2009
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Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) is an amplifier of TLR-mediated inflammation during bacterial infections. Thus far, TREM-1 is primarily associated with unwanted signs of overwhelming inflammation, rendering it an attractive target for conditions such as sepsis. Respiratory tract infections are the leading cause of sepsis, but the biological role of TREM-1 therein is poorly understood. To determine the function of TREM-1 in pneumococcal pneumonia, we first established TREM-1 up-regulation in infected lungs and human plasma together with augmented alveolar macrophage responsiveness toward Streptococcus pneumoniae. Mice treated with an agonistic TREM-1 Ab and infected with S. pneumoniae exhibited an enhanced early induction of the inflammatory response that was indirectly associated with lower levels of negative regulators of TLR signaling in lung tissue in vivo. Later in infection, TREM-1 engagement altered S. pneumoniae-induced IRAK-M (IL-1R-associated kinase-M) kinetics so as to promote the resolution of pneumonia and remarkably led to an accelerated elimination of bacteria and consequently improved survival. These data show that TREM-1 exerts a protective role in the innate immune response to a common bacterial infection and suggest that caution should be exerted in modulating TREM-1 activity during certain clinically relevant bacterial infections.
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Successful treatment of familial Mediterranean fever with Anakinra and outcome after renal transplantation.
Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2009
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Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation. The most severe complication of FMF is the development of AA amyloidosis, which can be life threatening. The only current effective treatment for FMF is colchicine. Regular prophylactic treatment with colchicine at a dose of 1-2 mg daily prevents or substantially reduces the clinical manifestations of FMF in at least 90% of cases. However, approximately 10% of patients are reported to be resistant or non-responsive to colchicine and in these cases there is no consensus as to which second line agents should be used. We describe the first case, to our knowledge, of a patient with FMF and end-stage renal failure due to AA amyloidosis, successfully treated with IL-1 receptor blockade. Our data suggest that the IL-1 receptor antagonist Anakinra (Kineret; r-metHuIL-1 ra) may represent a safe and effective therapy for the treatment of colchicine-resistant FMF, in patients requiring renal replacement therapy, with dialysis or transplantation.
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Multi-hit inhibition of circulating and cell-associated components of the toll-like receptor 4 pathway by oxidized phospholipids.
Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2009
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Oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs) that are abundant in atherosclerotic lesions are increasingly recognized as context-dependent lipid mediators demonstrating both pro- and antiinflammatory activities. Molecular mechanisms of their effects are largely unknown. Here we present novel information on the mechanisms whereby OxPLs modulate activation of TLR4 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS).
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Peptide Bbeta(15-42) preserves endothelial barrier function in shock.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2009
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Loss of vascular barrier function causes leak of fluid and proteins into tissues, extensive leak leads to shock and death. Barriers are largely formed by endothelial cell-cell contacts built up by VE-cadherin and are under the control of RhoGTPases. Here we show that a natural plasmin digest product of fibrin, peptide Bbeta15-42 (also called FX06), significantly reduces vascular leak and mortality in animal models for Dengue shock syndrome. The ability of Bbeta15-42 to preserve endothelial barriers is confirmed in rats i.v.-injected with LPS. In endothelial cells, Bbeta15-42 prevents thrombin-induced stress fiber formation, myosin light chain phosphorylation and RhoA activation. The molecular key for the protective effect of Bbeta15-42 is the src kinase Fyn, which associates with VE-cadherin-containing junctions. Following exposure to Bbeta15-42 Fyn dissociates from VE-cadherin and associates with p190RhoGAP, a known antagonists of RhoA activation. The role of Fyn in transducing effects of Bbeta15-42 is confirmed in Fyn(-/-) mice, where the peptide is unable to reduce LPS-induced lung edema, whereas in wild type littermates the peptide significantly reduces leak. Our results demonstrate a novel function for Bbeta15-42. Formerly mainly considered as a degradation product occurring after fibrin inactivation, it has now to be considered as a signaling molecule. It stabilizes endothelial barriers and thus could be an attractive adjuvant in the treatment of shock.
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Diabetes and infection: is there a link?--A mini-review.
Gerontology
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Diabetes mellitus is one of the most prevalent conditions in the elderly and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, mainly from cardiovascular and renal complications. Furthermore, common perception associates diabetes with a generally increased susceptibility to infectious diseases, although epidemiologic data that would prove this are surprisingly scarce. However, it seems to be confirmed that diabetes predisposes to certain types of infection and death thereof, but it is less well understood if metabolic disturbances in diabetes itself, associated hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia or diabetes-associated comorbidities provide the link between diabetes and susceptibility to infections. In this review, I will summarize published reports on the incidence and risk for infectious diseases in diabetic people and give a comprehensive overview of the molecular mechanisms that have been suggested to explain the potentially altered immune response to pathogens in patients with diabetes.
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PDGFR blockade is a rational and effective therapy for NPM-ALK-driven lymphomas.
Nat. Med.
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Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkins lymphoma found in children and young adults. ALCLs frequently carry a chromosomal translocation that results in expression of the oncoprotein nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK). The key molecular downstream events required for NPM-ALK-triggered lymphoma growth have been only partly unveiled. Here we show that the activator protein 1 family members JUN and JUNB promote lymphoma development and tumor dissemination through transcriptional regulation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-? (PDGFRB) in a mouse model of NPM-ALK-triggered lymphomagenesis. Therapeutic inhibition of PDGFRB markedly prolonged survival of NPM-ALK transgenic mice and increased the efficacy of an ALK-specific inhibitor in transplanted NPM-ALK tumors. Notably, inhibition of PDGFRA and PDGFRB in a patient with refractory late-stage NPM-ALK(+) ALCL resulted in rapid, complete and sustained remission. Together, our data identify PDGFRB as a previously unknown JUN and JUNB target that could be a highly effective therapy for ALCL.
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Apolipoprotein B100 is a suppressor of Staphylococcus aureus-induced innate immune responses in humans and mice.
Eur. J. Immunol.
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Plasma lipoproteins such as LDL (low-density lipoprotein) are important therapeutic targets as they play a crucial role in macrophage biology and metabolic disorders. The impact of lipoprotein profiles on host defense pathways against Gram-positive bacteria is poorly understood. In this report, we discovered that human serum lipoproteins bind to lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Staphylococcus aureus and thereby alter the immune response to these bacteria. Size-exclusion chromatography and solid-phase-binding analysis of serum revealed the direct interaction of LTA with apolipoproteins (Apo) B100, ApoA1, and ApoA2. Only ApoB100 and the corresponding LDL exerted biological effects as this binding significantly inhibited LTA-induced cytokine releases from human and murine immune cells. Serum from hypercholesterolemic mice or humans significantly diminished cytokine induction in response to S. aureus or its LTA. Sera taken from the patients with familial hypercholesterolemia before and after ApoB100-directed immuno-apheresis confirmed that ApoB100 inhibited LTA-induced inflammation in humans. In addition, mice in which LDL secretion was pharmacologically inhibited, displayed significantly increased serum cytokine levels upon infection with S. aureus in vivo. The present study identifies ApoB100 as an important suppressor of innate immune activation in response to S. aureus and its LTA.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.