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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Neuronal transport defects of the MAP6 KO mouse - a model of schizophrenia - and alleviation by Epothilone D treatment, as observed using MEMRI.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2014
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The MAP6 (microtubule-associated protein 6) KO mouse is a microtubule-deficient model of schizophrenia that exhibits severe behavioral disorders that are associated with synaptic plasticity anomalies. These defects are alleviated not only by neuroleptics, which are the gold standard molecules for the treatment of schizophrenia, but also by Epothilone D (Epo D), which is a microtubule-stabilizing molecule. To compare the neuronal transport between MAP6 KO and wild-type mice and to measure the effect of Epo D treatment on neuronal transport in KO mice, MnCl2 was injected in the primary somatosensory cortex. Then, using manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), we followed the propagation of Mn(2+) through axonal tracts and brain regions that are connected to the somatosensory cortex. In MAP6 KO mice, the measure of the MRI relative signal intensity over 24h revealed that the Mn(2+) transport rate was affected with a stronger effect on long-range and polysynaptic connections than in short-range and monosynaptic tracts. The chronic treatment of MAP6 KO mice with Epo D strongly increased Mn(2+) propagation within both mono- and polysynaptic connections. Our results clearly indicate an in vivo deficit in neuronal Mn(2+) transport in KO MAP6 mice, which might be due to both axonal transport defects and synaptic transmission impairments. Epo D treatment alleviated the axonal transport defects, and this improvement most likely contributes to the positive effect of Epo D on behavioral defects in KO MAP6 mice.
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Reduced expression of STOP/MAP6 in mice leads to cognitive deficits.
Schizophr Bull
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STOP/MAP6 null (KO) mice recapitulate behavioral abnormalities related to positive and negative symptoms and cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. Here, we investigated whether decreased expression of STOP/MAP6 proteins in heterozygous mice (only one allele expressed) would result in abnormal behavior related to those displayed by STOP null mice.
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Cacnb4 directly couples electrical activity to gene expression, a process defective in juvenile epilepsy.
EMBO J.
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Calcium current through voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) controls gene expression. Here, we describe a novel signalling pathway in which the VGCC Cacnb4 subunit directly couples neuronal excitability to transcription. Electrical activity induces Cacnb4 association to Ppp2r5d, a regulatory subunit of PP2A phosphatase, followed by (i) nuclear translocation of Cacnb4/Ppp2r5d/PP2A, (ii) association with the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene promoter through the nuclear transcription factor thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TR?), and (iii) histone binding through association of Cacnb4 with HP1? concomitantly with Ser(10) histone H3 dephosphorylation by PP2A. This signalling cascade leads to TH gene repression by Cacnb4 and is controlled by the state of interaction between the SH3 and guanylate kinase (GK) modules of Cacnb4. The human R482X CACNB4 mutation, responsible for a form of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, prevents association with Ppp2r5 and nuclear targeting of the complex by altering Cacnb4 conformation. These findings demonstrate that an intact VGCC subunit acts as a repressor recruiting platform to control neuronal gene expression.
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How morphological constraints affect axonal polarity in mouse neurons.
PLoS ONE
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Neuronal differentiation is under the tight control of both biochemical and physical information arising from neighboring cells and micro-environment. Here we wished to assay how external geometrical constraints applied to the cell body and/or the neurites of hippocampal neurons may modulate axonal polarization in vitro. Through the use of a panel of non-specific poly-L-lysine micropatterns, we manipulated the neuronal shape. By applying geometrical constraints on the cell body we provided evidence that centrosome location was not predictive of axonal polarization but rather follows axonal fate. When the geometrical constraints were applied to the neurites trajectories we demonstrated that axonal specification was inhibited by curved lines. Altogether these results indicated that intrinsic mechanical tensions occur during neuritic growth and that maximal tension was developed by the axon and expressed on straight trajectories. The strong inhibitory effect of curved lines on axon specification was further demonstrated by their ability to prevent formation of multiple axons normally induced by cytochalasin or taxol treatments. Finally we provided evidence that microtubules were involved in the tension-mediated axonal polarization, acting as curvature sensors during neuronal differentiation. Thus, biomechanics coupled to physical constraints might be the first level of regulation during neuronal development, primary to biochemical and guidance regulations.
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Neuronal architectures with axo-dendritic polarity above silicon nanowires.
Small
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An approach is developped to gain control over the polarity of neuronal networks at the cellular level by physically constraining cell development by the use of micropatterns. It is demonstrated that the position and path of individual axons, the cell extension that propagates the neuron output signal, can be chosen with a success rate higher than 85%. This allows the design of small living computational blocks above silicon nanowires.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.