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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Cytoskeletal regulation of CD44 membrane organization and interactions with E-selectin.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2014
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Interactions of CD44 on neutrophils with E-selectin on activated endothelial cells mediate rolling under flow, a prerequisite for neutrophil arrest and migration into perivascular tissues. How CD44 functions as a rolling ligand despite its weak affinity for E-selectin is unknown. We examined the nanometer-scale organization of CD44 on intact cells. CD44 on leukocytes and transfected K562 cells was crosslinked within a 1.14-nm spacer. Depolymerizing actin with latrunculin B reduced crosslinking. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) revealed tight co-clustering between CD44 fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and CD44 fused to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) on K562 cells. Latrunculin B reduced FRET-reported co-clustering. Number and brightness (N&B) analysis confirmed actin-dependent CD44-YFP clusters on living cells. CD44 lacking binding sites for ankyrin and for ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins on its cytoplasmic domain (?ANK?ERM) did not cluster. Unexpectedly, CD44 lacking only the ankyrin-binding site (?ANK) formed larger but looser clusters. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) demonstrated increased CD44 mobility by latrunculin B treatment or by deleting the cytoplasmic domain. ?ANK?ERM mobility increased only modestly, suggesting that the cytoplasmic domain engages the cytoskeleton by an additional mechanism. Ex vivo-differentiated CD44-deficient neutrophils expressing exogenous CD44 rolled on E-selectin and activated Src kinases after binding anti-CD44 antibody. In contrast, differentiated neutrophils expressing ?ANK had impaired rolling and kinase activation. These data demonstrate that spectrin and actin networks regulate CD44 clustering and suggest that ankyrin enhances CD44-mediated neutrophil rolling and signaling.
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Podoplanin requires sialylated O-glycans for stable expression on lymphatic endothelial cells and for interaction with platelets.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 10-23-2014
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O-glycosylation of podoplanin (PDPN) on lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) is critical for the separation of blood and lymphatic systems by interacting with platelet C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) during development. However, how O-glycosylation controls endothelial PDPN function and expression remains unclear. Here we report that core 1 O-glycan-deficient or desialylated PDPN was highly susceptible to proteolytic degradation by various proteases including metalloproteinases MMP-2/9. We found that the lymph contained activated MMP-2/9 and incubation of the lymph reduced surface levels of PDPN on core 1 O-glycan-deficient endothelial cells (ECs), but not on WT ECs. The lymph from mice with sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), which contained bacteria-derived sialidase, reduced PDPN levels on WT ECs. These reductions were rescued by metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. Additionally, GM6001 treatment rescued the reduction of PDPN level on LECs in mice lacking endothelial core 1 O-glycan or CLP-treated mice. Furthermore, core 1 O-glycan-deficient or desialylated PDPN impaired platelet interaction under physiological flow. These data indicate that sialylated O-glycans of PDPN are essential for platelet adhesion and prevent PDPN from proteolytic degradation primarily mediated by metalloproteinases in the lymph.
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Temporal and spatial regulation of epsin abundance and VEGFR3 signaling are required for lymphatic valve formation and function.
Sci Signal
PUBLISHED: 10-16-2014
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Lymphatic valves prevent the backflow of the lymph fluid and ensure proper lymphatic drainage throughout the body. Local accumulation of lymphatic fluid in tissues, a condition called lymphedema, is common in individuals with malformed lymphatic valves. The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR3) is required for the development of lymphatic vascular system. The abundance of VEGFR3 in collecting lymphatic trunks is high before valve formation and, except at valve regions, decreases after valve formation. We found that in mesenteric lymphatics, the abundance of epsin 1 and 2, which are ubiquitin-binding adaptor proteins involved in endocytosis, was low at early stages of development. After lymphatic valve formation, the initiation of steady shear flow was associated with an increase in the abundance of epsin 1 and 2 in collecting lymphatic trunks, but not in valve regions. Epsin 1 and 2 bound to VEGFR3 and mediated the internalization and degradation of VEGFR3, resulting in termination of VEGFR3 signaling. Mice with lymphatic endothelial cell-specific deficiency of epsin 1 and 2 had dilated lymphatic capillaries, abnormally high VEGFR3 abundance in collecting lymphatics, immature lymphatic valves, and defective lymph drainage. Deletion of a single Vegfr3 allele or pharmacological suppression of VEGFR3 signaling restored normal lymphatic valve development and lymph drainage in epsin-deficient mice. Our findings establish a critical role for epsins in the temporal and spatial regulation of VEGFR3 abundance and signaling in collecting lymphatic trunks during lymphatic valve formation.
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Transcriptional regulation of podoplanin expression by Prox1 in lymphatic endothelial cells.
Microvasc. Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2014
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Transcription factor prospero homeobox 1 (Prox-1) and podoplanin (PDPN), mucin-type transmembane protein, are both constantly expressed in lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and appear to function in an LEC-autonomous manner. Mice globally lacking PDPN (Pdpn(-/-)) develop abnormal and blood-filled lymphatic vessels that highly resemble those in inducible mice lacking Prox-1 (Prox1(-/-)). Prox1 has also been reported to induce PDPN expression in cultured ECs. Thus, we hypothesize that PDPN functions downstream of Prox1 and that its expression is regulated by Prox1 in LECs at the transcriptional level. We first identified four putative binding elements for Prox1 in the 5' upstream regulatory region of Pdpn gene and found that Prox1 directly binds to the 5' regulatory sequence of Pdpn gene in LECs by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. DNA pull down assay confirmed that Prox1 binds to the putative binding element. In addition, luciferase reporter assay indicated that Prox1 binding to the 5' regulatory sequence of Pdpn regulates Pdpn gene expression. We are therefore the first to experimentally demonstrate that Prox1 regulates PDPN expression at the transcriptional level in the lymphatic vascular system.
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Elevated CXCL1 expression in gp130-deficient endothelial cells impairs neutrophil migration in mice.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2013
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Neutrophils emigrate from venules to sites of infection or injury in response to chemotactic gradients. How these gradients form is not well understood. Some IL-6 family cytokines stimulate endothelial cells to express adhesion molecules and chemokines that recruit leukocytes. Receptors for these cytokines share the signaling subunit gp130. We studied knockout mice lacking gp130 in endothelial cells. Unexpectedly, gp130-deficient endothelial cells constitutively expressed more CXCL1 in vivo and in vitro, and even more upon stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-?. Mobilization of this increased CXCL1 from intracellular stores to the venular surface triggered ?2 integrin-dependent arrest of neutrophils rolling on selectins but impaired intraluminal crawling and transendothelial migration. Superfusing CXCL1 over venules promoted neutrophil migration only after intravenously injecting mAb to CXCL1 to diminish its intravascular function or heparinase to release CXCL1 from endothelial proteoglycans. Remarkably, mice lacking gp130 in endothelial cells had impaired histamine-induced venular permeability, which was restored by injecting anti-P-selectin mAb to prevent neutrophil rolling and arrest. Thus, excessive CXCL1 expression in gp130-deficient endothelial cells augments neutrophil adhesion but hinders migration, most likely by disrupting chemotactic gradients. Our data define a role for endothelial cell gp130 in regulating integrin-dependent adhesion and de-adhesion of neutrophils during inflammation.
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Podoplanin maintains high endothelial venule integrity by interacting with platelet CLEC-2.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 07-23-2013
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Circulating lymphocytes continuously enter lymph nodes for immune surveillance through specialized blood vessels named high endothelial venules, a process that increases markedly during immune responses. How high endothelial venules (HEVs) permit lymphocyte transmigration while maintaining vascular integrity is unknown. Here we report a role for the transmembrane O-glycoprotein podoplanin (PDPN, also known as gp38 and T1?) in maintaining HEV barrier function. Mice with postnatal deletion of Pdpn lost HEV integrity and exhibited spontaneous bleeding in mucosal lymph nodes, and bleeding in the draining peripheral lymph nodes after immunization. Blocking lymphocyte homing rescued bleeding, indicating that PDPN is required to protect the barrier function of HEVs during lymphocyte trafficking. Further analyses demonstrated that PDPN expressed on fibroblastic reticular cells, which surround HEVs, functions as an activating ligand for platelet C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2, also known as CLEC1B). Mice lacking fibroblastic reticular cell PDPN or platelet CLEC-2 exhibited significantly reduced levels of VE-cadherin (also known as CDH5), which is essential for overall vascular integrity, on HEVs. Infusion of wild-type platelets restored HEV integrity in Clec-2-deficient mice. Activation of CLEC-2 induced release of sphingosine-1-phosphate from platelets, which promoted expression of VE-cadherin on HEVs ex vivo. Furthermore, draining peripheral lymph nodes of immunized mice lacking sphingosine-1-phosphate had impaired HEV integrity similar to Pdpn- and Clec-2-deficient mice. These data demonstrate that local sphingosine-1-phosphate release after PDPN-CLEC-2-mediated platelet activation is critical for HEV integrity during immune responses.
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Platelets lacking PIP5KI? have normal integrin activation but impaired cytoskeletal-membrane integrity and adhesion.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2013
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Three isoforms of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIP5KI?, PIP5KI?, and PIP5KI?) can each catalyze the final step in the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), which in turn can be either converted to second messengers or bind directly to and thereby regulate proteins such as talin. A widely quoted model speculates that only p90, a longer splice form of platelet-specific PIP5KI?, but not the shorter p87 PIP5KI?, regulates the ligand-binding activity of integrins via talin. However, when we used mice genetically engineered to lack only p90 PIP5KI?, we found that p90 PIP5KI? is not critical for integrin activation or platelet adhesion on collagen. However, p90 PIP5KI?-null platelets do have impaired anchoring of their integrins to the underlying cytoskeleton. Platelets lacking both the p90 and p87 PIP5KI? isoforms had normal integrin activation and actin dynamics, but impaired anchoring of their integrins to the cytoskeleton. Most importantly, they formed weak shear-resistant adhesions ex vivo and unstable vascular occlusions in vivo. Together, our studies demonstrate that, although PIP5KI? is essential for normal platelet function, individual isoforms of PIP5KI? fulfill unique roles for the integrin-dependent integrity of the membrane cytoskeleton and for the stabilization of platelet adhesion.
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Regulation of catch bonds by rate of force application.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 07-20-2011
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The current paradigm for receptor-ligand dissociation kinetics assumes off-rates as functions of instantaneous force without impact from its prior history. This a priori assumption is the foundation for predicting dissociation from a given initial state using kinetic equations. Here we have invalidated this assumption by demonstrating the impact of force history with single-bond kinetic experiments involving selectins and their ligands that mediate leukocyte tethering and rolling on vascular surfaces during inflammation. Dissociation of bonds between L-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) loaded at a constant ramp rate to a constant hold force behaved as catch-slip bonds at low ramp rates that transformed to slip-only bonds at high ramp rates. Strikingly, bonds between L-selectin and 6-sulfo-sialyl Lewis X were impervious to ramp rate changes. This ligand-specific force history effect resembled the effect of a point mutation at the L-selectin surface (L-selectinA108H) predicted to contact the former but not the latter ligand, suggesting that the high ramp rate induced similar structural changes as the mutation. Although the A108H substitution in L-selectin eliminated the ramp rate responsiveness of its dissociation from PSGL-1, the inverse mutation H108A in P-selectin acquired the ramp rate responsiveness. Our data are well explained by the sliding-rebinding model for catch-slip bonds extended to incorporate the additional force history dependence, with Ala-108 playing a pivotal role in this structural mechanism. These results call for a paradigm shift in modeling the mechanical regulation of receptor-ligand bond dissociation, which includes conformational coupling between binding pocket and remote regions of the interacting molecules.
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Cytoplasmic domain of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 facilitates dimerization and export from the endoplasmic reticulum.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2011
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P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) is a homodimeric transmembrane mucin on leukocytes. During inflammation, reversible interactions of PSGL-1 with selectins mediate leukocyte rolling on vascular surfaces. The transmembrane domain of PSGL-1 is required for dimerization, and the cytoplasmic domain propagates signals that activate ?(2) integrins to slow rolling on integrin ligands. Leukocytes from knock-in "?CD" mice express a truncated PSGL-1 that lacks the cytoplasmic domain. Unexpectedly, they have 10-fold less PSGL-1 on their surfaces than WT leukocytes. Using glycosidases, proteases, Western blotting, confocal microscopy, cell-surface cross-linking, FRET, and pulse-chase metabolic labeling, we demonstrate that deleting the cytoplasmic domain impaired dimerization and delayed export of PSGL-1 from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), markedly increasing a monomeric precursor in the ER and decreasing mature PSGL-1 on the cell surface. A monomeric full-length PSGL-1 made by substituting the transmembrane domain with that of CD43 exited the ER normally, revealing that dimerization was not required for ER export. Thus, the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains cooperate to promote dimerization of PSGL-1. Furthermore, the cytoplasmic domain provides a key signal to export precursors of PSGL-1 from the ER to the Golgi apparatus en route to the cell surface.
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Differential regulation of human and murine P-selectin expression and function in vivo.
J. Exp. Med.
PUBLISHED: 12-13-2010
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Leukocytes roll on P-selectin after its mobilization from secretory granules to the surfaces of platelets and endothelial cells. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), IL-1?, and lipopolysaccharide increase synthesis of P-selectin in murine but not in human endothelial cells. To explore the physiological significance of this difference in gene regulation, we made transgenic mice bearing the human Selp gene and crossed them with mice lacking murine P-selectin (Selp(-/-)). The transgenic mice constitutively expressed human P-selectin in platelets, endothelial cells, and macrophages. P-selectin mediated comparable neutrophil migration into the inflamed peritoneum of transgenic and wild-type (WT) mice. Leukocytes rolled similarly on human or murine P-selectin on activated murine platelets and in venules of the cremaster muscle subjected to trauma. However, TNF increased murine P-selectin in venules, slowing rolling and increasing adhesion, whereas it decreased human P-selectin, accelerating rolling and decreasing adhesion. Both P- and E-selectin mediated basal rolling in the skin of WT mice, but E-selectin dominated rolling in transgenic mice. During contact hypersensitivity, murine P-selectin messenger (m) RNA was up-regulated and P-selectin was essential for leukocyte recruitment. However, human P-selectin mRNA was down-regulated and P-selectin contributed much less to leukocyte recruitment. These findings reveal functionally significant differences in basal and inducible expression of human and murine P-selectin in vivo.
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Core 1-derived O-glycans are essential E-selectin ligands on neutrophils.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2010
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Neutrophils roll on E-selectin in inflamed venules through interactions with cell-surface glycoconjugates. The identification of physiologic E-selectin ligands on neutrophils has been elusive. Current evidence suggests that P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), E-selectin ligand-1 (ESL-1), and CD44 encompass all glycoprotein ligands for E-selectin; that ESL-1 and CD44 use N-glycans to bind to E-selectin; and that neutrophils lacking core 2 O-glycans have partially defective interactions with E-selectin. These data imply that N-glycans on ESL-1 and CD44 and O-glycans on PSGL-1 constitute all E-selectin ligands, with neither glycan subset having a dominant role. The enzyme T-synthase transfers Gal to GalNAcalpha1-Ser/Thr to form the core 1 structure Galbeta1-3GalNAcalpha1-Ser/Thr, a precursor for core 2 and extended core 1 O-glycans that might serve as selectin ligands. Here, using mice lacking T-synthase in endothelial and hematopoietic cells, we found that E-selectin bound to CD44 and ESL-1 in lysates of T-synthase-deficient neutrophils. However, the cells exhibited markedly impaired rolling on E-selectin in vitro and in vivo, failed to activate beta2 integrins while rolling, and did not emigrate into inflamed tissues. These defects were more severe than those of neutrophils lacking PSGL-1, CD44, and the mucin CD43. Our results demonstrate that core 1-derived O-glycans are essential E-selectin ligands; that some of these O-glycans are on protein(s) other than PSGL-1, CD44, and CD43; and that PSGL-1, CD44, and ESL-1 do not constitute all glycoprotein ligands for E-selectin.
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E-selectin engages PSGL-1 and CD44 through a common signaling pathway to induce integrin alphaLbeta2-mediated slow leukocyte rolling.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2010
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In inflamed venules, neutrophils rolling on E-selectin induce integrin alpha(L)beta(2)-dependent slow rolling on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 by activating Src family kinases (SFKs), DAP12 and Fc receptor-gamma (FcRgamma), spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), and p38. E-selectin signaling cooperates with chemokine signaling to recruit neutrophils into tissues. Previous studies identified P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) as the essential E-selectin ligand and Fgr as the only SFK that initiate signaling to slow rolling. In contrast, we found that E-selectin engagement of PSGL-1 or CD44 triggered slow rolling through a common, lipid raft-dependent pathway that used the SFKs Hck and Lyn as well as Fgr. We identified the Tec kinase Bruton tyrosine kinase as a key signaling intermediate between Syk and p38. E-selectin engagement of PSGL-1 was dependent on its cytoplasmic domain to activate SFKs and slow rolling. Although recruiting phosphoinositide-3-kinase to the PSGL-1 cytoplasmic domain was reported to activate integrins, E-selectin-mediated slow rolling did not require phosphoinositide-3-kinase. Studies in mice confirmed the physiologic significance of these events for neutrophil slow rolling and recruitment during inflammation. Thus, E-selectin triggers common signals through distinct neutrophil glycoproteins to induce alpha(L)beta(2)-dependent slow rolling.
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Signal-dependent slow leukocyte rolling does not require cytoskeletal anchorage of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) or integrin ?L?2.
J. Biol. Chem.
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In inflamed venules, neutrophils roll on P- or E-selectin, engage P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), and signal extension of integrin ?(L)?(2) in a low affinity state to slow rolling on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Cytoskeleton-dependent receptor clustering often triggers signaling, and it has been hypothesized that the cytoplasmic domain links PSGL-1 to the cytoskeleton. Chemokines cause rolling neutrophils to fully activate ?(L)?(2), leading to arrest on ICAM-1. Cytoskeletal anchorage of ?(L)?(2) has been linked to chemokine-triggered extension and force-regulated conversion to the high affinity state. We asked whether PSGL-1 must interact with the cytoskeleton to initiate signaling and whether ?(L)?(2) must interact with the cytoskeleton to extend. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of transfected cells documented cytoskeletal restraint of PSGL-1. The lateral mobility of PSGL-1 similarly increased by depolymerizing actin filaments with latrunculin B or by mutating the cytoplasmic tail to impair binding to the cytoskeleton. Converting dimeric PSGL-1 to a monomer by replacing its transmembrane domain did not alter its mobility. By transducing retroviruses expressing WT or mutant PSGL-1 into bone marrow-derived macrophages from PSGL-1-deficient mice, we show that PSGL-1 required neither dimerization nor cytoskeletal anchorage to signal ?(2) integrin-dependent slow rolling on P-selectin and ICAM-1. Depolymerizing actin filaments or decreasing actomyosin tension in neutrophils did not impair PSGL-1- or chemokine-mediated integrin extension. Unlike chemokines, PSGL-1 did not signal cytoskeleton-dependent swing out of the ?(2)-hybrid domain associated with the high affinity state. The cytoskeletal independence of PSGL-1-initiated, ?(L)?(2)-mediated slow rolling differs markedly from the cytoskeletal dependence of chemokine-initiated, ?(L)?(2)-mediated arrest.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.