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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Cinanthrenol A, an estrogenic steroid containing phenanthrene nucleus, from a marine sponge Cinachyrella sp.
Org. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2014
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Cinanthrenol A (1), a new steroid composed of a phenanthrene and a spiro[2,4]heptane system, was isolated from the marine sponge Cinachyrella sp. It is the first phenathrene-containing steroid with estrogen activity.
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Reversible brain atrophy and cognitive impairment in an adolescent Japanese patient with primary adrenal Cushing's syndrome.
Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is an endocrine disease resulting from chronic exposure to excessive glucocorticoids produced in the adrenal cortex. Although the ultimate outcome remains uncertain, functional and morphological brain changes are not uncommon in patients with this syndrome, and generally persist even after resolution of hypercortisolemia. We present an adolescent patient with Cushing's syndrome who exhibited cognitive impairment with brain atrophy. A 19-year-old Japanese male visited a local hospital following 5 days of behavioral abnormalities, such as money wasting or nighttime wandering. He had hypertension and a 1-year history of a rounded face. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed apparently diffuse brain atrophy. Because of high random plasma cortisol levels (28.7 ?g/dL) at 10 AM, he was referred to our hospital in August 2011. Endocrinological testing showed adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent hypercortisolemia, and abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a 2.7 cm tumor in the left adrenal gland. The patient underwent left adrenalectomy in September 2011, and the diagnosis of cortisol-secreting adenoma was confirmed histologically. His hypertension and Cushingoid features regressed. Behavioral abnormalities were no longer observed, and he was classified as cured of his cognitive disturbance caused by Cushing's syndrome in February 2012. MRI performed 8 months after surgery revealed reversal of brain atrophy, and his subsequent course has been uneventful. In summary, the young age at onset and the short duration of Cushing's syndrome probably contributed to the rapid recovery of both cognitive dysfunction and brain atrophy in our patient. Cushing's syndrome should be considered as a possible etiological factor in patients with cognitive impairment and brain atrophy that is atypical for their age.
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Definite differences between in vitro actin-myosin sliding and muscle contraction as revealed using antibodies to myosin head.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Muscle contraction results from attachment-detachment cycles between myosin heads extending from myosin filaments and actin filaments. It is generally believed that a myosin head first attaches to actin, undergoes conformational changes to produce force and motion in muscle, and then detaches from actin. Despite extensive studies, the molecular mechanism of myosin head conformational changes still remains to be a matter for debate and speculation. The myosin head consists of catalytic (CAD), converter (CVD) and lever arm (LD) domains. To give information about the role of these domains in the myosin head performance, we have examined the effect of three site-directed antibodies to the myosin head on in vitro ATP-dependent actin-myosin sliding and Ca2+-activated contraction of muscle fibers. Antibody 1, attaching to junctional peptide between 50K and 20K heavy chain segments in the CAD, exhibited appreciable effects neither on in vitro actin-myosin sliding nor muscle fiber contraction. Since antibody 1 covers actin-binding sites of the CAD, one interpretation of this result is that rigor actin-myosin linkage is absent or at most a transient intermediate in physiological actin-myosin cycling. Antibody 2, attaching to reactive lysine residue in the CVD, showed a marked inhibitory effect on in vitro actin-myosin sliding without changing actin-activated myosin head (S1) ATPase activity, while it showed no appreciable effect on muscle contraction. Antibody 3, attaching to two peptides of regulatory light chains in the LD, had no significant effect on in vitro actin-myosin sliding, while it reduced force development in muscle fibers without changing MgATPase activity. The above definite differences in the effect of antibodies 2 and 3 between in vitro actin-myosin sliding and muscle contraction can be explained by difference in experimental conditions; in the former, myosin heads are randomly oriented on a glass surface, while in the latter myosin heads are regularly arranged within filament-lattice structures.
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Direct STM elucidation of the effects of atomic-level structure on Pt(111) electrodes for dissolved CO oxidation.
J. Am. Chem. Soc.
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2013
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We sought to establish a new standard for direct comparison of electrocatalytic activity with surface structure using in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) by examining the electrooxidation of CO in a CO-saturated solution on Pt(111) electrodes with steps, with combined electrochemical measurements, in situ STM, and density functional theory (DFT). On pristine Pt(111) surfaces with initially disordered (111) steps, CO oxidation commences at least 0.5 V lower than that for the main oxidation peak at ca. 0.8-1.0 V vs the reversible hydrogen electrode in aqueous perchloric acid solution. As the potential was cycled between 0.07 and 0.95 V, the CO oxidation activity gradually decreased until only the main oxidation peak remained. In situ STM showed that the steps became perfectly straight. A plausible reason for the preference for (111) steps in the presence of CO is suggested by DFT calculations. In contrast, on a pristine Pt(111) surface with rather straight (100) steps, the low-potential CO oxidation activity was less than that for the pristine, uncycled (111) steps. As the potential was cycled, the activity also decreased greatly. Interestingly, after cycling, in situ STM showed that (111) microsteps were introduced at the (100) steps. Thus, potential cycling in the presence of dissolved CO highly favors formation of (111) steps. The CO oxidation activity in the low-potential region decreased in the following order: disordered (111) steps > straight (100) steps > (100) steps with local (111) microsteps ? straight (111) steps.
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Enhancement of force generated by individual myosin heads in skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers at low ionic strength.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Although evidence has been presented that, at low ionic strength, myosin heads in relaxed skeletal muscle fibers form linkages with actin filaments, the effect of low ionic strength on contraction characteristics of Ca(2+)-activated muscle fibers has not yet been studied in detail. To give information about the mechanism of muscle contraction, we have examined the effect of low ionic strength on the mechanical properties and the contraction characteristics of skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers in both relaxed and maximally Ca(2+)-activated states. By progressively decreasing KCl concentration from 125 mM to 0 mM (corresponding to a decrease in ionic strength ? from 170 mM to 50 mM), relaxed fibers showed changes in mechanical response to sinusoidal length changes and ramp stretches, which are consistent with the idea of actin-myosin linkage formation at low ionic strength. In maximally Ca(2+)-activated fibers, on the other hand, the maximum isometric force increased about twofold by reducing KCl concentration from 125 to 0 mM. Unexpectedly, determination of the force-velocity curves indicated that, the maximum unloaded shortening velocity Vmax, remained unchanged at low ionic strength. This finding indicates that the actin-myosin linkages, which has been detected in relaxed fibers at low ionic strength, are broken quickly on Ca(2+) activation, so that the linkages in relaxed fibers no longer provide any internal resistance against fiber shortening. The force-velocity curves, obtained at various levels of steady Ca(2+)-activated isometric force, were found to be identical if they are normalized with respect to the maximum isometric force. The MgATPase activity of muscle fibers during isometric force generation was found not to change appreciably at low ionic strength despite the two-fold increase in Ca(2+)-activated isometric force. These results can be explained in terms of enhancement of force generated by individual myosin heads, but not by any changes in kinetic properties of cyclic actin-myosin interaction.
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Immunohistochemical analysis of oral dysplasia: diagnostic assessment by fascin and podoplanin expression.
Acta Histochem Cytochem
PUBLISHED: 07-07-2011
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The aim of this study was to investigate fascin and podoplanin expression in oral dysplasia and carcinoma in situ (CIS) immunohistochemically, and to evaluate their relationship to histopathological diagnosis based on architectural and cytological features. Fascin and podoplanin expression patterns were analyzed immunohistologically in 26 specimens of oral lesions, including benign disease (hyperplasia, papilloma, and others), intraepithelial neoplasia/borderline disease (dysplasia), and malignant disease (CIS, invasive squamous cell carcinoma). Fascin expression was scored into four original categories, and podoplanin expression was scored into five previously established categories. The relationship between the immunohistochemically determined scores of fascin and podoplanin expression and the architectural and cytological features in the hematoxylin-eosin-stained slides was analyzed statistically. The immunostaining scores for fascin and podoplanin were significantly higher in dysplasia and CIS than in benign disease (p=0.0011, p=0.00036), and they were significantly higher in dysplasia than in benign disease (p=0.0087, p=0.0032). In all cases of invasive SCC, fascin was expressed mainly in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells and fascin expression extended from the destruction of the basal layer of the epithelium to the upper layer of the epithelium and podoplanin was expressed in the cytoplasm and membrane of the tumor cells. This was the first report of up-regulation of fascin in oral dysplasia. Our results suggest that it would be helpful for improving the diagnostic accuracy of oral dysplasia and CIS to assess the expression of fascin and podoplanin immunohistochemically.
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Pain may predict poor prognosis in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2011
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We have previously reported that the histologic mode of invasion of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a significant risk factor for pain. Here we sought to determine whether pain is a risk factor for poor prognosis in patients with OSCC.
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Desensitization therapy for allergic reactions to antituberculous drugs.
Intern. Med.
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2010
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We retrospectively evaluated the clinical usefulness of desensitization therapy for many patients showing allergic reactions to anti-mycobacterial drugs (INH and RFP) according to the proposition reported by the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis (JST).
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Functional role of acetylcholine and the expression of cholinergic receptors and components in osteoblasts.
FEBS Lett.
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2010
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Recent studies have indicated that acetylcholine (ACh) plays a vital role in various tissues, while the role of ACh in bone metabolism remains unclear. Here we demonstrated that ACh induced cell proliferation and reduced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity via nicotinic (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in osteoblasts. We detected mRNA expression of several nAChRs and mAChRs. Furthermore, we showed that cholinergic components were up-regulated and subunits/subtypes of acetylcholine receptors altered during osteoblast differentiation. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that osteoblasts express specific acetylcholine receptors and cholinergic components and that ACh plays a possible role in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts.
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Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing sialadenitis: report of two cases and review of the literature.
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2009
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A new concept of IgG4-related disease characterized by a high serum IgG4 level and tissue infiltration of IgG4-positive plasmacytes that can involve salivary glands has been proposed. In this article, 2 patients with IgG4-related sclerosing sialadenitis involving the submandibular glands are reported. One patient presented with bilateral and painless swelling of the submandibular glands. He had already been treated with systemic prednisolone owing to the occurrence of retrobulbar neuritis. Laboratory examinations showed high serum IgG4 concentrations, and a biopsy of the submandibular gland revealed the infiltration of IgG4-positive plasmacytes. Abdominal computerized tomography demonstrated tumefaction in the tail of the pancreas, thus suggesting localized autoimmune pancreatitis. The other patient also showed bilateral and painless swelling of the submandibular glands, but there was no involvement of any other organs. These patients were effectively treated with corticosteroids, which resulted in a reduction of the swelling of the submandibular gland and increased saliva. When a patient is suspected of having sclerosing sialadenitis, it is important to consider that the patient may have a systemic IgG4-related plasmacytic disease.
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Identification of mutation sites on Delta12 desaturase genes from Mortierella alpina 1S-4 mutants.
J. Biosci. Bioeng.
PUBLISHED: 02-17-2009
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The mutation sites on the Delta12 desaturase gene in Mortierella alpina Delta12 desaturase-defective mutants SR88, TM912, and Mut48 accumulating Mead acid were identified. Each mutation resulted in an amino acid replacement (H116Y and P166L) in the Delta12 desaturase gene from SR88 and Mut48, respectively.
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Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma arising in calcifying odontogenic cyst.
Ann Diagn Pathol
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2009
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A case of exceptionally rare odontogenic malignant tumor, called ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma, is described. The tumor was considered to be derived from calcifying odontogenic cyst, which had been resected 5 years before. In the present resected specimen, cellular atypia, mitotic activity, Ki-67 labeling index, and p53 positivity were all increased in comparison with the initially resected specimen. This is a valuable case in which malignant transformation from calcifying odontogenic cyst to ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma was proven by the histopathologic and immunohistochemical findings. Pathologists should be aware of this rare entity.
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Identification of mutation sites on omega3 desaturase genes from Mortierella alpina 1S-4 mutants.
J. Biosci. Bioeng.
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2009
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The mutation sites on omega3 desaturase genes in two omega3 desaturase-defective mutants derived from arachidonic acid-producing Mortierella alpina 1S-4 were identified. The mutations each resulted in an amino acid replacement (W232Stop or W386Stop) which caused a lack of omega3 desaturase activity in these mutants.
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Usefulness of electromagnetic induction type of force transducer and actuator for myofibril mechanics.
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc
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A high performance device for measuring force and length change during myofibril contraction is fabricated. The principle of a device depends on the law of electromagnetic induction. Homogenized myofibrils were attached between two wires exposed in the uniform magnetic field by silicon adhesive under an inverted microscope. The purpose of this study is to examine performance whether the electromagnetic induction type of device actually works. Sensitivity and time resolution of force transducer was 50nN and 1ms respectively. Working displacement and time resolution of actuator as length transducer was 1-20 ┬Ám and 1.2 ms. We confirmed the performance of the device by showing appropriate force response to changes in length during myofibrils contraction, and possibility of application of the device to myofibril mechanics is discussed.
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Correlation between salivary interleukin-6 levels and early locoregional recurrence in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma: preliminary study.
Head Neck
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We have demonstrated that salivary interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentrations change during the treatment in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We sought to elucidate the correlations between salivary IL-6 concentration and early locoregional recurrence in OSCC.
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Construction of a metagenomic library for the marine sponge Halichondria okadai.
Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem.
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Symbionts of the marine sponge Halichondria okadai are promising as a source of natural products. Metagenomic technology is a powerful tool for accessing the genetic and biochemical potential of bacteria. Hence, we established a method of recovering bacterial-enriched metagenomic DNA by stepwise centrifugation. The metagenomic DNA was analyzed by ultrafast 454-pyrosequencing technology, and the results suggested that more than three types of bacterial DNA, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Cyanobacteria, had been recovered, and that eukaryotic genes comprised only 0.02% of the metagenomic DNA. These results indicate that stepwise centrifugation and real-time quantitative PCR were effective for separating sponge cells and symbiotic bacteria, and that we constructed a bacteria-enriched metagenomic library from a marine sponge, H. okadai, selectively for the first time.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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