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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor and reverse dipping pattern of nocturnal blood pressure in patients with cardiovascular risk factors.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2014
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Basic studies have shown that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has critical roles in the survival, growth, maintenance, and death of central and peripheral neurons, while it is also involved in regulation of the autonomic nervous system. Furthermore, recent clinical studies have suggested potential role of plasma BDNF in the circulatory system.
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Comparison of effects of pioglitazone and glimepiride on plasma soluble RAGE and RAGE expression in peripheral mononuclear cells in type 2 diabetes: randomized controlled trial (PioRAGE).
Atherosclerosis
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2014
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The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is involved in vascular complications in diabetic patients. Pioglitazone, in contrast to glimepiride, has been shown to be protective against atherosclerotic disorders. In this study, we directly compared the effects of those drugs on RAGE system.
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Comparison of the effect of cilostazol with aspirin on circulating endothelial progenitor cells and small-dense LDL cholesterol in diabetic patients with cerebral ischemia: a randomized controlled pilot trial.
J. Atheroscler. Thromb.
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2011
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A recent clinical trial showed the preventive effect of cilostazol on cerebrovascular diseases. We compared the effects of cilostazol with aspirin on circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), a surrogate marker for cardiovascular disease, and lipid metabolism in a randomized controlled trial (UMIN000000537).
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Biochemistry of uridine in plasma.
Clin. Chim. Acta
PUBLISHED: 02-03-2011
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Uridine is a pyrimidine nucleoside that plays a crucial role in synthesis of RNA, glycogen, and biomembrane. In humans, uridine is present in plasma in considerably higher quantities than other purine and pyrimidine nucleosides, thus it may be utilized for endogenous pyrimidine synthesis. Uridine has a number of biological effects on a variety of organs with or without disease, such as the reproductive organs, central and peripheral nervous systems, and liver. In addition, it is used in clinical situations as a rescue agent to protect against the adverse effects of 5-fluorouracil. Since the biological actions of uridine may be related to its plasma concentration, it is important to examine factors that have effects on that concentration. Factors associated with an increase in plasma concentration of uridine include enhanced ATP consumption, enhanced uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose consumption via glycogenesis, inhibited uridine uptake by cells via the nucleoside transport pathway, increased intestinal absorption, and increased 5-phosphribosyl-1-pyrophosphate and urea synthesis. In contrast, factors that decrease the plasma concentration of uridine are associated with accelerated uridine uptake by cells via the nucleoside transport pathway and decreased pyrimidine synthesis.
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Receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) regulation of adiposity and adiponectin is associated with atherogenesis in apoE-deficient mouse.
Atherosclerosis
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2010
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Receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) has been shown to be involved in cardiovascular diseases. We examined the involvement of RAGE in atherosclerosis under non-diabetic status, and its relation to the effect on adiposity.
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Advanced glycation end products, carotid atherosclerosis, and circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with end-stage renal disease.
Metab. Clin. Exp.
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2010
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Numbers of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been shown to be decreased in subjects with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the mechanism of which remained poorly understood. In this study, mutual association among circulating EPC levels, carotid atherosclerosis, serum pentosidine, and skin autofluorescence, a recently established noninvasive measure of advanced glycation end products accumulation, was examined in 212 ESRD subjects undergoing hemodialysis. Numbers of circulating EPCs were measured as CD34+ CD133+ CD45(low) VEGFR2+ cells and progenitor cells as CD34+ CD133+ CD45(low) fraction by flow cytometry. Skin autofluorescence was assessed by the autofluorescence reader; and serum pentosidine, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Carotid atherosclerosis was determined as intimal-medial thickness (IMT) measured by ultrasound. Circulating EPCs were significantly and inversely correlated with skin autofluorescence in ESRD subjects (R = -0.216, P = .002), but not with serum pentosidine (R = -0.079, P = .25). Circulating EPCs tended to be inversely associated with IMT (R = -0.125, P = .069). Intimal-medial thickness was also tended to be correlated positively with skin autofluorescence (R = 0.133, P = .054) and significantly with serum pentosidine (R = 0.159, P = .019). Stepwise multiple regression analyses reveal that skin autofluorescence, but not serum pentosidine and IMT, was independently associated with low circulating EPCs. Of note, skin autofluorescence was also inversely and independently associated with circulating progenitor cells. Thus, tissue accumulated, but not circulating, advanced glycation end products may be a determinant of a decrease in circulating EPCs in ESRD subjects.
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Dialysis modality is independently associated with circulating endothelial progenitor cells in end-stage renal disease patients.
Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 07-23-2009
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Numbers of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) have been shown to be decreased in subjects with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It is not clear, however, whether dialysis modality affects circulating EPCs in ESRD subjects.
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Receptor for advanced glycation end products regulates adipocyte hypertrophy and insulin sensitivity in mice: involvement of Toll-like receptor 2.
Diabetes
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Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has been shown to be involved in adiposity as well as atherosclerosis even in nondiabetic conditions. In this study, we examined mechanisms underlying how RAGE regulates adiposity and insulin sensitivity. RAGE overexpression in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes using adenoviral gene transfer accelerated adipocyte hypertrophy, whereas inhibitions of RAGE by small interfering RNA significantly decrease adipocyte hypertrophy. Furthermore, double knockdown of high mobility group box-1 and S100b, both of which are RAGE ligands endogenously expressed in 3T3-L1 cells, also canceled RAGE-medicated adipocyte hypertrophy, implicating a fundamental role of ligands-RAGE ligation. Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by RAGE overexpression is associated with suppression of glucose transporter type 4 and adiponectin mRNA expression, attenuated insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, and insulin-stimulated signaling. Toll-like receptor (Tlr)2 mRNA, but not Tlr4 mRNA, is rapidly upregulated by RAGE overexpression, and inhibition of Tlr2 almost completely abrogates RAGE-mediated adipocyte hypertrophy. Finally, RAGE(-/-) mice exhibited significantly less body weight, epididymal fat weight, epididymal adipocyte size, higher serum adiponectin levels, and higher insulin sensitivity than wild-type mice. RAGE deficiency is associated with early suppression of Tlr2 mRNA expression in adipose tissues. Thus, RAGE appears to be involved in mouse adipocyte hypertrophy and insulin sensitivity, whereas Tlr2 regulation may partly play a role.
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Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing kinase 2 deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells leads to increased cholesterol efflux and decreased atherosclerosis.
Circulation
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Macrophages play a central role in the development of atherosclerosis. However, the signaling pathways that regulate their function are not well understood. The Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing kinases (ROCK1 and ROCK2) are serine-threonine protein kinases that are involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Recent studies suggest that ROCK1 in macrophages and bone marrow-derived cells mediates atherogenesis. However, a similar role for ROCK2 in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis has not been determined.
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Relationship between serum allantoin and urate in healthy subjects and effects of benzbromarone in gout patients.
Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther
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Although hyperuricemia is suggested to increase allantoin production in both pro- and antioxidant manners, it remains undetermined whether it increases the serum concentration of allantoin. In addition, since uric acid has both pro- and antioxidant actions, a decrease in the serum concentration of uric acid may have an effect on the pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.