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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Investigation into the structural composition of hydroalcoholic solutions as basis for the development of multiple suppression pulse sequences for NMR measurement of alcoholic beverages.
Magn Reson Chem
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2014
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An eight-fold suppression pulse sequence was recently developed to improve sensitivity in (1) H NMR measurements of alcoholic beverages [Magn. Res. Chem. 2011 (49): 734-739]. To ensure that only one combined hydroxyl peak from water and ethanol appears in the spectrum, adjustment to a certain range of ethanol concentrations was required. To explain this observation, the structure of water-ethanol solutions was studied. Hydroalcoholic solutions showed extreme behavior at 25% vol, 46% vol, and 83% vol ethanol according to (1) H NMR experiments. Near-infrared spectroscopy confirmed the occurrence of four significant compounds ('individual' ethanol and water structures as well as two water-ethanol complexes of defined composition - 1?:?1 and 1?:?3). The successful multiple suppression can be achieved for every kind of alcoholic beverage with different alcoholic strengths, when the final ethanol concentration is adjusted to a range between 25% vol and 46% vol (e.g. using dilution or pure ethanol addition). In this optimum region, an individual ethanol peak was not detected, because the 'individual' water structure and the 1?:?1 ethanol-water complex predominate. The nature of molecular association in ethanol-water solutions is essential to elucidate NMR method development for measurement of alcoholic beverages. The presented approach can be used to optimize other NMR suppression protocols for binary water-organic solvent mixtures, where hydrogen bonding plays a dominant role. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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Determination of the purity of pharmaceutical reference materials by 1H NMR using the standardless PULCON methodology.
J Pharm Biomed Anal
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2014
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A fast and reliable nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic method for quantitative determination (qNMR) of targeted molecules in reference materials has been established using the ERETIC2 methodology (electronic reference to access in vivo concentrations) based on the PULCON principle (pulse length based concentration determination). The developed approach was validated for the analysis of pharmaceutical samples in the context of official medicines control, including ibandronic acid, amantadine, ambroxol and lercanidipine. The PULCON recoveries were above 94.3% and coefficients of variation (CVs) obtained by quantification of different targeted resonances ranged between 0.7% and 2.8%, demonstrating that the qNMR method is a precise tool for rapid quantification (approximately 15min) of reference materials and medicinal products. Generally, the values were within specification (certified values) provided by the manufactures. The results were in agreement with NMR quantification using an internal standard and validated reference HPLC analysis. The PULCON method was found to be a practical alternative with competitive precision and accuracy to the classical internal reference method and it proved to be applicable to different solvent conditions. The method can be recommended for routine use in medicines control laboratories, especially when the availability and costs of reference compounds are problematic.
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Rapid assessment of the illegal presence of 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA) in sports nutrition and dietary supplements using 1H NMR spectroscopy.
Drug Test Anal
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2014
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1,3-Dimethylamylamine (DMAA) is a stimulant that can be found in pre-workout sports nutrition and dietary supplements. This practice is illegal because DMAA is not a safe food ingredient but rather an unapproved medicinal compound due to its pharmacological action. In order to determine the DMAA content in such products, a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic method was developed and validated (DMAA was quantified as DMAA-HCl). For quantification, the collective integral from two of the methyl groups of the molecule in the range ? 0.92-0.84 ppm was used. The method was linear over the examined range of 1-21 g/kg (R(2)?= 0.9937). The recoveries from spiked concentrations (0.1-6 g/kg) ranged between 85% and 105% (96% on average), with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1% for an authentic sample. The detection limit was 0.03 g/kg and the quantification limit was 0.08 g/kg (calculated for 75 mg sample weight). The actual DMAA-HCl content in the sample was quantified using calibration curves (external standardization) or 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid as single-point internal standard. The developed NMR methodology was applied for the analysis of 16 products, from which 9 samples were found positive (the DMAA-HCl concentration varied between 3.1 g/kg and 415 g/kg). The method can be recommended for routine use in food testing, customs or doping control laboratories.
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NMR investigation of acrolein stability in hydroalcoholic solution as a foundation for the valid HS-SPME/GC-MS quantification of the unsaturated aldehyde in beverages.
Anal. Chim. Acta
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2014
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Acrolein (propenal) is found in many foods and beverages and may pose a health hazard due to its cytotoxicity. Considerable knowledge gaps regarding human exposure to acrolein exist, and there is a lack of reliable analytical methods. Hydroalcoholic dilutions prepared for calibration purposes from pure acrolein show considerable degradation of the compound and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy showed that 1,3,3-propanetriol and 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde are formed. The degradation can be prevented by addition of hydroquinone as stabilizer to the calibration solutions, which then show linear concentration-response behaviour required for quantitative analysis. The stabilized calibration solutions were used for quantitative headspace solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME/GC-MS) determination of acrolein in alcoholic beverages with a detection limit of 14 ?g L(-1). Of 117 tested alcoholic beverages, 64 were tested positive with the highest incidence in grape marc spirits and whiskey (100%, mean 252 ?g L(-1)), followed by fruit spirits (86%, mean 591 ?g/L(-1)), tequila (86%, mean 404 ?g L(-1)), Asian spirits (43%, mean 54 ?g L(-1)) and wine (9%, mean 0.7 ?g L(-1)). Acrolein could not be detected in beer, vodka, absinthe and bottled water. Six of the fruit and grape marc spirits had acrolein levels above the World Health Organization (WHO) provisional tolerable concentration of 1.5 mg L(-1).
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Independent component analysis (ICA) algorithms for improved spectral deconvolution of overlapped signals in 1H NMR analysis: application to foods and related products.
Magn Reson Chem
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2014
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The major challenge facing NMR spectroscopic mixture analysis is the overlapping of signals and the arising impossibility to easily recover the structures for identification of the individual components and to integrate separated signals for quantification. In this paper, various independent component analysis (ICA) algorithms [mutual information least dependent component analysis (MILCA); stochastic non-negative ICA (SNICA); joint approximate diagonalization of eigenmatrices (JADE); and robust, accurate, direct ICA algorithm (RADICAL)] as well as deconvolution methods [simple-to-use-interactive self-modeling mixture analysis (SIMPLISMA) and multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS)] are applied for simultaneous (1)H NMR spectroscopic determination of organic substances in complex mixtures. Among others, we studied constituents of the following matrices: honey, soft drinks, and liquids used in electronic cigarettes. Good quality spectral resolution of up to eight-component mixtures was achieved (correlation coefficients between resolved and experimental spectra were not less than 0.90). In general, the relative errors in the recovered concentrations were below 12%. SIMPLISMA and MILCA algorithms were found to be preferable for NMR spectra deconvolution and showed similar performance. The proposed method was used for analysis of authentic samples. The resolved ICA concentrations match well with the results of reference gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as well as the MCR-ALS algorithm used for comparison. ICA deconvolution considerably improves the application range of direct NMR spectroscopy for analysis of complex mixtures.
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Synergistic effect of the simultaneous chemometric analysis of ¹H NMR spectroscopic and stable isotope (SNIF-NMR, ¹?O, ¹³C) data: application to wine analysis.
Anal. Chim. Acta
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2014
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It is known that (1)H NMR spectroscopy represents a good tool for predicting the grape variety, the geographical origin, and the year of vintage of wine. In the present study we have shown that classification models can be improved when (1)H NMR profiles are fused with stable isotope (SNIF-NMR, (18)O, (13)C) data. Variable selection based on clustering of latent variables was performed on (1)H NMR data. Afterwards, the combined data of 718 wine samples from Germany were analyzed using linear discriminant analysis (LDA), partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), factorial discriminant analysis (FDA) and independent components analysis (ICA). Moreover, several specialized multiblock methods (common components and specific weights analysis (ComDim), consensus PCA and consensus PLS-DA) were applied to the data. The best improvement in comparison with (1)H NMR data was obtained for prediction of the geographical origin (up to 100% for the fused data, whereas stable isotope data resulted only in 60-70% correct prediction and (1)H NMR data alone in 82-89% respectively). Certain enhancement was obtained also for the year of vintage (from 88 to 97% for (1)H NMR to 99% for the fused data), whereas in case of grape varieties improved models were not obtained. The combination of (1)H NMR data with stable isotope data improves efficiency of classification models for geographical origin and vintage of wine and can be potentially used for other food products as well.
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Composition of distilled Perique tobacco liqueur: a connoisseur's spirit or a health risk due to nicotine?
Food Chem
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2014
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The use of tobacco leaves as a food ingredient has been controversially discussed, and alcoholic beverages containing distillates from fermented tobacco leaves can be found as niche products. Currently there is an absence of knowledge regarding the composition and toxicity of these products. One liqueur sample based on distilled Louisiana Perique tobacco was analysed using quantitative FTIR, GC-FID, LC/MS/MS and GC/MS/MS methodologies, and qualitatively using non-targeted NMR and GC/MS techniques. Quantitative NMR was used for nicotine analysis. Nicotine was not detectable (LOD=0.2 mg/l). Other compounds associated with toxicity of tobacco or alcoholic beverages were either not detectable, or were found below the toxicity thresholds. A model experiment using fractionised distillation of a nicotine solution has confirmed that the compound was predominantly found in the tailing fractions of the distillate, which are discarded. In conclusion, there was no additional health risk associated with beverages diligently distilled from tobacco leaves, beside the effects of ethanol. This judgment clearly does not apply to beverages where tobacco leaves have only been macerated (and not distilled) or foods where the whole tobacco leaves are incorporated.
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Rapid determination of coenzyme Q10 in food supplements using 1H NMR spectroscopy.
Int J Vitam Nutr Res
PUBLISHED: 11-14-2013
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A methodology utilizing 1H NMR spectroscopy has been developed to measure the concentration of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in dietary supplements. For sample preparation, a very simple dilution with deuterated chloroform and addition of internal standard is sufficient. CoQ10 produces a distinct peak of the CH groups in the isoprene side chain of the molecule in the ? 5.15 - 5.05 ppm range, where it can be distinguished from other matrix compounds. The method was shown to be of adequate sensitivity with a limit of detection (LOD) of 7.8 mg/L, to control the CoQ10 content in the majority of the products. The precision expressed as relative standard deviation was around 5 %; linearity was observed from 14 to 2000 mg/L (R = 0.99). The developed methodology was applied for the analysis of 21 food supplements (capsules, tablets, and liquid products). On the basis of the labeled amounts, only two products contained substantially lower concentrations of CoQ10 (57 % and 51 %). All other concentrations varied between 83 % and 190 % with respect to labeling. The developed NMR method may be used by quality assurance laboratories for routine control of CoQ10 products.
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Determination of free fatty acids in pharmaceutical lipids by (1)H NMR and comparison with the classical acid value.
J Pharm Biomed Anal
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2013
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Indices like acid value, peroxide value, and saponification value play an important role in quality control and identification of lipids. Requirements on these parameters are given by the monographs of the European pharmacopeia. (1)H NMR spectroscopy provides a fast and simple alternative to these classical approaches. In the present work a new (1)H NMR approach to determine the acid value is described. The method was validated using a statistical approach based on a variance components model. The performance under repeatability and in-house reproducibility conditions was assessed. We applied this (1)H NMR assay to a wide range of different fatty oils. A total of 305 oil and fat samples were examined by both the classical and the NMR method. Except for hard fat, the data obtained by the two methods were in good agreement. The (1)H NMR method was adapted to analyse waxes and oleyloleat. Furthermore, the effect of solvent and in the case of castor oil the effect of the oil matrix on line broadening and chemical shift of the carboxyl group signal are discussed.
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Formaldehyde in hair straightening products: rapid ¹H NMR determination and risk assessment.
Int J Cosmet Sci
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2013
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Despite official regulations, the illegal use of formaldehyde-containing or releasing hair straightening products has become a popular practice in Europe and high contents of formaldehyde in such products have been reported. In this study, a methodology utilizing (1)H NMR spectroscopy has been developed to measure the concentration of formaldehyde in hair straightening products. For sample preparation, a dilution and alkaline hydrolysis is required. The total formaldehyde content can then be quantified by a distinct peak of the CH2 group of the methanediol molecule in the ?4.84-4.82 ppm range. The developed methodology was applied for the analysis of 10 hair straightening products. Seven of these products contained detectable amounts of formaldehyde that were higher than the maximum allowed concentration of 0.2%. The formaldehyde content of these products was found to be in the range 0.42-5.83% with an average concentration of 1.46%. The accuracy and reliability of the NMR results were confirmed by the EU reference photometric method. The air formaldehyde concentrations after application of hair straightening products were estimated in ranges 20-423 ppm and 1-18 ppm (for 1 and 24 m(3) salon volume). A probabilistic exposure estimation using Monte Carlo simulation found the average formaldehyde concentration to be 6 ppm (standard deviation 15 ppm). All exposure scenarios considerably exceeded the safe level of 0.1 ppm. Our findings confirmed that the risk of cosmetic formulations with formaldehyde above 0.2% is not negligible, as these products may facilitate considerable exposure of formaldehyde for consumers especially for salon workers.
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Unrecorded alcohol consumption in Russia: toxic denaturants and disinfectants pose additional risks.
Interdiscip Toxicol
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2011
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In 2005, 30% of all alcohol consumption in Russia was unrecorded. This paper describes the chemical composition of unrecorded and low cost alcohol, including a toxicological evaluation. Alcohol products (n=22) from both recorded and unrecorded sources were obtained from three Russian cities (Saratov, Lipetsk and Irkutsk) and were chemically analyzed. Unrecorded alcohols included homemade samogons, medicinal alcohols and surrogate alcohols. Analysis included alcoholic strength, levels of volatile compounds (methanol, acetaldehyde, higher alcohols), ethyl carbamate, diethyl phthalate (DEP) and polyhexamethyleneguanidine hydrochloride (PHMG). Single samples showed contamination with DEP (275-1269 mg/l) and PHMG (515 mg/l) above levels of toxicological concern. Our detailed chemical analysis of Russian alcohols showed that the composition of vodka, samogon and medicinal alcohols generally did not raise major public health concerns other than for ethanol. It was shown, however, that concentration levels of DEP and PHMG in some surrogate alcohols make these samples unfit for human consumption as even moderate drinking would exceed acceptable daily intakes.
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Quality of illegally and informally produced alcohol in Europe: Results from the AMPHORA project.
Adicciones
PUBLISHED: 06-08-2011
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In the WHO region Europe, the average unrecorded adult per capita alcohol consumption was 2.67 L pure ethanol in 2005, which is 22% of the total consumption of 12.20 L. Despite concerns about potential health harms from the chemical composition of unrecorded alcohol, there are surprisingly few data on the problem in the European Region. This study reports the results from the Alcohol Measures for Public Health Research Alliance (AMPHORA) project, which assessed the quality of unrecorded alcohol in a Europe-wide study.
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Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and chemometrics to identify pine nuts that cause taste disturbance.
J. Agric. Food Chem.
PUBLISHED: 06-08-2011
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Nontargeted 400 MHz (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used in the context of food surveillance to reveal Pinus species whose nuts cause taste disturbance following their consumption, the so-called pine nut syndrome (PNS). Using principal component analysis, three groups of pine nuts were distinguished. PNS-causing products were found in only one of the groups, which however also included some normal products. Sensory analysis was still required to confirm PNS, but NMR allowed the sorting of 53% of 57 samples, which belong to the two groups not containing PNS species. Furthermore, soft independent modeling of class analogy was able to classify the samples between the three groups. NMR spectroscopy was judged as suitable for the screening of pine nuts for PNS. This process may be advantageous as a means of importation control that will allow the identification of samples suitable for direct clearance and those that require further sensory analysis.
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Application of automated eightfold suppression of water and ethanol signals in 1H NMR to provide sensitivity for analyzing alcoholic beverages.
Magn Reson Chem
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2011
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The 400 MHz (1)H NMR analysis of alcoholic beverages using standard pulse programs lacks the necessary sensitivity to detect minor constituents such as methanol, acetaldehyde or ethyl acetate. This study investigates the application of a shaped pulse sequence during the relaxation delay to suppress the eight (1)H NMR frequencies of water and ethanol (the OH singlet of both water and ethanol, as well as the CH(2) quartet and CH(3) triplet of ethanol). The sequence of reference measurement for frequency determination followed by the suppression experiment is controlled by a macro in the acquisition software so that a measurement under full automation is possible (12 min per sample total time). Additionally, sample preparation was optimized to avoid precipitation, which is facilitated by 1:1 dilution with ethanol and pH 7.4 buffer. Compared with the standard water presaturation pulse program, the eightfold suppression allowed a significantly higher setting of receiver gain without receiver overflow, which significantly increased the signal-to-noise ratio by an average factor of 10. The signal intensities increased by a factor of 20. The resulting limits of detection (below 1 g/hl of pure alcohol) now allow the control of legal requirements for minor compounds in alcoholic beverages.
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Determination of the biologically active flavour substances thujone and camphor in foods and medicines containing sage (Salvia officinalis L.).
Chem Cent J
PUBLISHED: 05-11-2011
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The sage plant Salvia officinalis L. is used as ingredient in foods and beverages as well as in herbal medicinal products. A major use is in the form of aqueous infusions as sage tea, which is legal to be sold as either food or medicine. Sage may contain two health relevant substances, thujone and camphor. The aim of this study was to develop and validate an analytical methodology to determine these active principles of sage and give a first overview of their concentrations in a wide variety of sage foods and medicines.
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Is contaminated unrecorded alcohol a health problem in the European Union? A review of existing and methodological outline for future studies.
Addiction
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2011
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Some European countries with high levels of unrecorded alcohol consumption have anomalously high rates of death attributable to liver cirrhosis. Hepatotoxic compounds in illegally produced spirits may be partly responsible. Based on a review of the evidence on the chemical composition and potential harm from unrecorded alcohol, the Alcohol Measures for Public Health Research Alliance (AMPHORA) projects methodology for identifying, analysing and toxicologically evaluating such alcohols is provided.
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Determination of diethyl phthalate and polyhexamethylene guanidine in surrogate alcohol from Russia.
Int J Anal Chem
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2011
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Analytical methods based on spectroscopic techniques were developed and validated for the determination of diethyl phthalate (DEP) and polyhexamethylene guanidine (PHMG), which may occur in unrecorded alcohol. Analysis for PHMG was based on UV-VIS spectrophotometry after derivatization with Eosin Y and (1)H NMR spectroscopy of the DMSO extract. Analysis of DEP was performed with direct UV-VIS and (1)H NMR methods. Multivariate curve resolution and spectra computation methods were used to confirm the presence of PHMG and DEP in the investigated beverages. Of 22 analysed alcohol samples, two contained DEP or PHMG. (1)H NMR analysis also revealed the presence of signals of hawthorn extract in three medicinal alcohols used as surrogate alcohol. The simple and cheap UV-VIS methods can be used for rapid screening of surrogate alcohol samples for impurities, while (1)H NMR is recommended for specific confirmatory analysis if required.
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Detailed exposure assessment of dietary furan for infants consuming commercially jarred complementary food based on data from the DONALD study.
Matern Child Nutr
PUBLISHED: 12-22-2010
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Furan is a possible human carcinogen regularly occurring in commercially jarred complementary foods. This paper will provide a detailed exposure assessment for babies consuming these foods considering different intake scenarios. The occurrence data on furan in complementary foods were based on our own headspace-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (HS-GC/MS) analytical results (n = 286). The average furan content in meals and menus was between 20 and 30 µg kg(-1), which is in excellent agreement with results from other European countries. Using measured food consumption data from the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed (DONALD) study, the average exposures for consumers of commercially jarred foods ranged between 182 and 688 ng kg(-1) bw day(-1), with a worst case scenario for P95 consumers ranging between 351 and 1066 ng kg(-1) bw day(-1). The exposure data were then used to characterize risk using the margin of exposure method based on a benchmark dose lower confidence limit for a 10% response (BMDL10) of 1.28 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for hepatocellular tumours in rats. The margin of exposures (MOEs) were below the threshold of 10 000, which is often used to define public health risks, in all scenarios, ranging between 7022 and 1861 for average consumers and between 3642 and 1200 for the P95 consumers. Mitigative measures to avoid furan in complementary foods should be of high priority for risk management.
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The composition of unrecorded alcohol from eastern Ukraine: is there a toxicological concern beyond ethanol alone?
Food Chem. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 03-09-2010
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In 2005, approximately half of all alcohol consumption in Ukraine was unrecorded. This paper investigates the chemical composition of unrecorded and low-cost alcohol, including a toxicological evaluation. A sample of alcohol products (n=78) from both recorded and unrecorded sources was obtained mainly from eastern Ukraine, and chemically analyzed. Analysis entailed alcoholic strength, levels of volatile compounds (methanol, acetaldehyde, higher alcohols), ethyl carbamate, anions, and inorganic elements. The majority of unrecorded alcohol was homemade samohon with alcoholic strength averaging close to 40% vol. A limited number of samples, advertised for medicinal purposes, were identified with high alcoholic strengths (above 60% vol.). Single samples showed contamination with acetaldehyde and ethyl carbamate above the levels of toxicological concern. Metal contamination was frequent, with copper levels above 2mg/l in 33 samples, and zinc above 5mg/l in 10 samples. Overall, however, the composition of unrecorded samples did not raise major public health concerns other those for ethanol. The priority of alcohol policy in Ukraine should be the general reduction of alcohol consumption with a specific focus on that from small-scale home production. Further research is needed on potential mitigative measures and the origin of the metal contamination in particular alcoholic beverages.
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Chemical analysis and risk assessment of diethyl phthalate in alcoholic beverages with special regard to unrecorded alcohol.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2009
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Phthalates are synthetic compounds with a widespread field of applications. For example, they are used as plasticizers in PVC plastics and food packaging, or are added to personal care products. Diethyl phthalate (DEP) may be used to denature alcohol, e.g., for cosmetic purposes. Public health concerns of phthalates include carcinogenic, teratogenic, hepatotoxic and endocrine effects. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a method for determining phthalates in alcohol samples and to provide a risk assessment for consumers of such products.
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Risk assessment of furan in commercially jarred baby foods, including insights into its occurrence and formation in freshly home-cooked foods for infants and young children.
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2009
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Furan is a possible human carcinogen (IARC group 2B) with widespread occurrence in many types of foods. In this study, a survey of furan contamination in 230 commercially jarred ready-to-eat infant food products was conducted using headspace sampling in combination with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (HS-GC/MS) with a detection limit of 0.2 microg kg(-1). The incidence of furan contamination in jarred infant beverages, cereals and fruits was relatively low, with average concentrations below 10 microg kg(-1). Significantly higher concentrations were found in pasta (34.8 +/- 14.5 microg kg(-1)), meals containing meat (28.2 +/- 15.0 microg kg(-1)), and meals containing vegetables (31.2 +/- 17.3 microg kg(-1)). The average exposure of 6-month-old infants to furan was estimated to be 0.2 microg per kg bodyweight per day. The margin of exposure calculated using the T25 dose descriptor would be 2692, which points to a possible public health risk. In contrast to commercially jarred food products, none of 20 freshly home-prepared baby foods contained furan above the limit of detection. Only after re-heating in closed vessels was furan found to have formed. Furan was especially prevalent in reheated foods containing potatoes, with values ranging between 2.3 and 29.2 microg kg(-1). The formation of furan in potato-containing baby foods was increased by addition of ascorbic acid, by longer heating times above 1 h and by temperatures above 50 degrees C. Research regarding reduction of furan in commercial baby foods should be conducted, with a priority aimed at reducing this heat-induced contaminant without concomitantly increasing the microbiological risk.
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Benzene in infant carrot juice: further insight into formation mechanism and risk assessment including consumption data from the DONALD study.
Food Chem. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2009
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Benzene was previously detected as a heat-induced contaminant in infant carrot juices. This study shows that carrot juice contains substances such as beta-carotene, phenylalanine or terpenes that may act as precursors for benzene formation during food processing. As benzene exposure has been associated with childhood leukaemia and other cancers, this study aimed to provide a quantitative risk assessment. To accomplish this, we used measured food consumption data from the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed (DONALD) study, along with survey data on benzene in different juice categories. The calculated exposures for infants between 3 and 12 months were low, with averages between 1 and 10 ng/kg bw/day, resulting in a margin of exposure above 100,000. The exposures were judged as unlikely to pose a health risk for infants. Nevertheless, carcinogenic contaminants should be reduced to levels as low as reasonably achievable. The focus should be set on improving the sterilization conditions.
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Long-term stability of thujone, fenchone, and pinocamphone in vintage preban absinthe.
J. Agric. Food Chem.
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2009
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Research was conducted to ascertain whether analyses of vintage absinthe samples represent their original composition in the early 1900s. Absinthe stored in traditional green glass bottles and irradiated with ultraviolet light for up to 200 h exhibited unchanged composition. Samples stored in clear glass exhibited an 18% reduction in beta-thujone content and a concurrent decoloration. These experiments indicate the stability of thujone in vintage absinthes, as these were stored in green glass bottles. The preserved color of the preban absinthes subjected to analysis indicates that no significant light exposure occurred throughout the duration of storage, and therefore provides indirect proof that no loss of terpenes occurred. The stability of absinthe was further demonstrated through the reanalysis of samples from 2001-2005, which exhibited no changes in thujone content as of 2008. A previous evaluation of preban absinthe was therefore valid and not confounded by significant thujone deterioration over time.
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Ethyl carbamate in alcoholic beverages from Mexico (tequila, mezcal, bacanora, sotol) and Guatemala (cuxa): market survey and risk assessment.
Int J Environ Res Public Health
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2009
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Ethyl carbamate (EC) is a recognized genotoxic carcinogen, with widespread occurrence in fermented foods and beverages. No data on its occurrence in alcoholic beverages from Mexico or Central America is available. Samples of agave spirits including tequila, mezcal, bacanora and sotol (n=110), and of the sugarcane spirit cuxa (n=16) were purchased in Mexico and Guatemala, respectively, and analyzed for EC. The incidence of EC contamination was higher in Mexico than in Guatemala, however, concentrations were below international guideline levels (<0.15 mg/L). Risk assessment found the Margin of Exposure (MOE) in line with that of European spirits. It is therefore unlikely that EC plays a role in high rates of liver cirrhosis reported in Mexico.
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What happens if people start drinking mouthwash as surrogate alcohol? A quantitative risk assessment.
Food Chem. Toxicol.
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Mouthwash ingestion has been observed in settings of restricted availability to alcoholic beverages such as in hospitals, prisons or military establishments. The literature offers limited evidence that ingredients of mouthwash may have health effects above the effects of ethanol. This study provides a quantitative risk assessment based on analysis of 30 mouthwash samples. All investigated brands contained alcohol, most of them menthol (93%), eucalyptol (90%), benzoic acid (87%), methyl salicylate (67%), and thymol (30%). For low risk drinking scenarios with average levels, only ethanol will exceed acceptable daily intakes (ADI). In worst case scenarios for alcohol dependent consumers ingesting 100g ethanol per day in the form of mouthwash, methyl salicylate will also exceeded the ADI by a factor of 17. The margin of exposure (MOE) for methyl salicylate, benzoates and thymol was below 100 for average scenarios, and below 10 for worst case scenarios, but ethanol is still the most toxic ingredient with MOE below 1. The occasional or even chronic ingestion of mouthwash may not cause health effects except the effects of ethanol alone. Only in extreme exposures, ingredients such as thymol or methyl salicylate could exacerbate the effects of ethanol, especially by contributing to metabolic acidosis.
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Standardless 1H NMR determination of pharmacologically active substances in dietary supplements and medicines that have been illegally traded over the internet.
Drug Test Anal
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Dietary supplements and medicines are widely marketed over the Internet. Such products may be counterfeited and lack some or all of the labelled ingredients, or, in the case of lifestyle supplements, illegally contain pharmacologically active substances, such as anorectic or androgenic compounds. The market control - especially in the case of customs seizures - is complex, as reference substances necessary for identification and calibration in traditional high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis are often unavailable, or extremely expensive. In this study, we introduce a 400 MHz (1) H NMR methodology, which allows identification and quantitative estimation even without such pure compound standards. The identification can be based on literature spectra, or if these data are unavailable, by applying computational NMR spectra prediction. For standardless NMR determination, simple peak-area comparison of the target compound with the TSP reference was used. The applicability was demonstrated for a wide range of compounds, such as mesterolone, oxymetholone, sibutramine, monacolin K, vinpocetine, evodiamine, caffeine, kavain, and dehydroepiandrosterone. The average relative standard deviations were 5.0% for peak area comparison, and 3.3% for external calibration with standard substance. The method uncertainty is therefore higher in standardless determination, but acceptable for the purpose of proving the presence or absence of pharmacologically active substances. The limit of detection of 0.5-2 mg/kg is sufficient for the purpose. NMR is ideally suited to controlling dietary supplements or illegal medicines as it provides qualitative and at least semi-quantitative information more rapidly (measurement time 20 min) than with any other currently available spectroscopic or chromatographic method.
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Holistic Control of Herbal Teas and Tinctures Based on Sage (Salvia officinalis L.) for Compounds with Beneficial and Adverse Effects using NMR Spectroscopy.
Anal Chem Insights
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A methodology that utilizes (1)H-NMR spectroscopy has been developed to simultaneously analyze toxic terpenes (thujone and camphor), major polyphenolic compounds, the total antioxidant capacity (ORAC) and the Folin-Ciocalteu (FC) index in foods and medicines containing sage. The quantitative determination of rosmarinic acid (limit of detection (LOD) = 10 mg/L) and total thujone (LOD = 0.35 mg/L) was possible using direct integration of the signals. For other parameters (derivatives of rosmarinic acid, carnosol and flavone glycosides, ORAC and FC index), chemometric regression models obtained separately for alcohol-based tinctures (R(2) = 0.94-0.98) and aqueous tea infusions (R(2) = 0.79-0.99) were suitable for screening analysis. The relative standard deviations for authentic samples were below 10%. The developed methodology was applied for the analysis of a wide variety of sage products (n = 108). The total thujone content in aqueous tea infusions was found to be in the range of not detectable (nd) to 37.5 mg/L (average 9.2 mg/L), while tinctures contained higher levels (range nd-409 mg/L, average 107 mg/L). The camphor content varied from 2.1 to 43.7 mg/L in aqueous infusions and from not detectable to 748 mg/L in tinctures (averages were 14.1 and 206 mg/L, respectively). Phenolic compounds were also detected in the majority of the investigated products. (1)H-NMR spectroscopy was proven to have the ability to holistically control all important adverse and beneficial compounds in sage products in a single experiment, considerably saving time, resources and costs as NMR replaces four separate methodologies that were previously needed to analyze the same parameters.
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NMR evaluation of total statin content and HMG-CoA reductase inhibition in red yeast rice (Monascus spp.) food supplements.
Chin Med
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Red yeast rice (i.e., rice fermented with Monascus spp.), as a food supplement, is claimed to be blood cholesterol-lowering. The red yeast rice constituent monacolin K, also known as lovastatin, is an inhibitor of the hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase. This article aims to develop a sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method to determine the total statin content of red yeast rice products.
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Qualitative and quantitative control of carbonated cola beverages using ¹H NMR spectroscopy.
J. Agric. Food Chem.
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¹H Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy (400 MHz) was used in the context of food surveillance to develop a reliable analytical tool to differentiate brands of cola beverages and to quantify selected constituents of the soft drinks. The preparation of the samples required only degassing and addition of 0.1% of TSP in D?O for locking and referencing followed by adjustment of pH to 4.5. The NMR spectra obtained can be considered as "fingerprints" and were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). Clusters from colas of the same brand were observed, and significant differences between premium and discount brands were found. The quantification of caffeine, acesulfame-K, aspartame, cyclamate, benzoate, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), sulfite ammonia caramel (E 150D), and vanillin was simultaneously possible using external calibration curves and applying TSP as internal standard. Limits of detection for caffeine, aspartame, acesulfame-K, and benzoate were 1.7, 3.5, 0.8, and 1.0 mg/L, respectively. Hence, NMR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics is an efficient tool for simultaneous identification of soft drinks and quantification of selected constituents.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.